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Welcome to CollegeHoopedia.com! This tell-it-like-it-is treasure trove of facts, statistical analysis and edgy opinion is unique because it catalogs the matchless performances of uncommon participants. Much of this dig-deep information you can't find anywhere else couldn't have been assembled without securing input from a variety of old-school basketball resources and passionate fans. We offer a hearty thank-you for visiting this salient site and seeking to enhance your contemporary and historical perspectives of college hoops plus possibly know more about us as a genuinely independent voice you can trust. We devoutly study the sport and will be chafed to the point of snarky whenever our ideals are threatened. Unflinchingly, there will be no mercy on anyone we believe is violating the game's integrity. Click here if you want to follow our incisive information and unvarnished truth on Twitter where we reject the simplistic church of group-think embracing sacred cows like so many of the embellishing follow-the-pack national media predictably trivializing verifiable truth and contrary creativity. Unabashedly, we aspire to be a three-dimensional "player" - respecting life lessons from the past, portraying the present with pithy posturing and keeping a keen eye on the future!

Hands Up, Don't Loot: Get Grades/Get Job/Get Tired/Get Good Night's Sleep

Based on his checkered selective-outrage track record, our nation of cowards can't rest easy because Attorney General Eric Holder is dispatched by a community-organizing sociopath to be more involved in the Michael Brown shooting death in Ferguson, Mo., including ordering an additional autopsy probably because the first one didn't measure up to their audience's preconceived shot-in-the-back narrative. Holder, receiving support from the golfer-in-chief and fellow leftists comparable to humiliated Huma (Shrillary Rotten II) standing by perverted Carlos Danger after the weiner's he-man online dialogue with a progressive activist from the Midwest, is showing as much legal expertise on a wide variety of issues as he did as a Columbia hoopster (missing all four field-goal attempts for 1969-70 freshman squad).

Led by completely inept Gov. Jay Nixon (Dem.), a lynch mob-like Saturday afternoon press conference in a church chock full of apostates exhibited decorum akin to an inmate shouting match/battle of wits featuring energized ebonics in a federal penitentiary. We saw a comparable tired act last summer in the Trayvon Martin shooting and now we get a similar fairytale from journalistic lemons such as Don Lemon of CNN (Contemptible News Network) playing judge and jury by portraying Brown on his way to Grandma's house in the hood as if he was Gentle Ben Walking Hood trying to avoid the wolf in sheep's clothes (police) by lumbering through middle of the street.

Last year, Dwyane Wade and his hypersensitive Miami Heat teammates discerned how to don hoodies in their self-appointed roles as victimization humanitarians but he couldn't explain the Martin verdict declaring George Zimmerman not guilty. "What do I tell my kids?" Wade tweeted, opening a lane for a mocking layup. Wade, rather than brushing up on facts concerning the Zimmerman case, exploited his sons as hoodie-donning props on an Ebony magazine cover. In conjunction with ambulance-chasing attorney Benjamin Crump's college-bound crumbs to enhance budding settlement value, similar celebrities are predictably already doing likewise in the Brown case.

"Leaders" could have emphasized cooperation with, not condemnation of, the cops in an effort to possibly start upgrading community standards. Instead, everyone with a double-digit IQ is convinced it's the fault of the untrustworthy police, yadda, yadda, yadda, via another myth-making template about a prowling renegade bigoted white cop with no disciplinary history seeking to execute Gentle Ben in cold blood. His Earness, ESPN's NCAA playoff prognosticator, certainly implied as much "justice" with pandering pap to the otherwise daytime audience for the sports cable network while most of America is working (and paying for their free goodies and "50" FBI-agent overdose politically "racing" to probe a single death).

Whether or not they are purchased or stolen, it won't be long before denials will surface about Swisher Sweets being sliced open and swapping all or a portion of tobacco with marijuana for a gentle high or bullish rush. Turning the "national-conversation" heat high while unsure of the quality of classes Wade took under coach Tom Crean at Marquette, following are dos and don'ts (a/k/a "affirmative action") do-gooder Dwyane and other minority fathers (if they're around) should tell their sons so they wade in wise, not wayward, waters by adhering to a series of elusive community-healing guidelines:

  • Don't show any confidence in a biased mass media reporting the news fully, accurately and fairly if an incident doesn't fit their liberal narrative (see sexy domestic terrorist Rolling Stones cover as classic example). Also, maybe we missed the politically-correct police memo, but is it now OK to deploy the word "boy" with such regularity or is it reserved solely for excuse-filled leftists similar to other intemperate terms?

  • Do the right thing like the courageous IT director even if you get fired by a fluffy Florida state attorney for sharing all of the trial evidence. Tell the whole truth unlike the putrid press and dishonorable state attorney who filed a misleading affidavit. Simply support a proper cause more than petulant POTUS does the Middle East Christian carnage although his administration seems fond of a Charlie Chaplin convention while Syrians are gassed.

  • Don't impair your education by conducting yourself in such a manner you get kicked out of your home and/or school. Remember: Only about half of black males graduate from high school. In your academic pursuits, don't fall for POTUS pap such as the hoopster-in-chief claiming that raising the debt ceiling does not increase the nation's debt or ObamaCare is a first-rate online venture. And here's a novel thought while mulling over the fact a disproportionate number of lawbreakers are young black males: Resembling some repulsive rapper from the wrong side of the hood might make you look like a real or wannabee "knockout" criminal. On the other hand, former New Jersey Nets minority owner Jay Z said dealing drugs helped shape his business skills long before inspiring our nation by becoming comrade cozy in Communist Cuba with wife Beyoncé for their anniversary vacation.

  • Do become an authentic "national action" leader such as Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, Thomas Sowell and Dr. Ben Carson while rejecting the predictable pandering poison from retread race-baiting hustlers, aspiring to be relevant through their all-dark rainbow prism, directed at the low-information sheep mob prior to passing their donations cap. Don't affiliate with half-baked reverends wallowing in the grievance industry of shakedown selective civil rights such as their sainthood of Anita Hill. Rather than doing more harm to blacks than David Duke and George Wallace by always playing the "battered race syndrome" card from the bottom of a decadent deck, it might be a mite more prudent to focus on paying your taxes and explaining to your son how to handle campaign money and a mistress.

  • Don't be a parasite smoking weed and getting involved with drugs unless it helps prevent you from becoming a nanny-state social engineer fantasizing in the "could've-been-me" world of dismissive and derisive phony scandals. Let me be clear! Phony is telling glaring untruths from the "bullying" pulpit about retaining your existing healthcare or standing in front of caskets and hiding behind a hyped video while meandering to get to the bottom of patriotic, not languishing, Americans being murdered and belittling folks who deserve straight answers. You're also a chip-on-your-shoulder phony who will always be left behind if you can't exercise deductive reasoning and comprehend straight-answer facts staring you in the face.

  • Do steer clear of street thuggery attacks and the Gangsta culture in every way. Spend more time like blustery Big O keeping an inventory of how items such as jewelry, not Skittles or cigarillos, came in your possession. Then you might be able to concentrate on "a spiritual union" with a partner (Mr. Oprah) or keep a keen watch on the "racist" Swiss. The devastation of fatherless boys caused by liberal welfare policies is a factor in the Centers for Disease Control reporting that young black men are 14 times more likely to commit murder than young white men.

  • Don't use the creepy term "Cracka" (offensive to Wheat Thins) when describing a Hispanic; let alone a wily White-Spanic or full-fledged caustic Caucasian. Although you might have a female friend claiming you "wanted to be a basketball player," that dialogue won't get you a passing grade in Trash Talking 101. Let your standards resonate a mite higher than rolling the dice like an AAU team from Atlanta donning "I AM TRAYVON" shirts before and after games in a Las Vegas tournament or the grandstanding Alabama State marching band spelling out his name for some sort of symbolic gesture at halftime of a football game. Please! You can do better than this drivel! Let's see if Alabama State's bereaved band can spell the name of any "Cracka" victim stemming from the Navy Yard rampage in the District of Columbia.

  • Do be sufficiently discriminating not to be a peer-pressure slave to liberal racism resulting in 90% of tunnel-vision blacks voting one way. Compare the percentage of blacks who voted for McCain/Romney in the last two presidential elections to percentage of whites who voted for Obama and then be honest with yourself asking who immerses themselves in tarnished practice of bigoted racial profiling to deal with never-forgotten white privilege. An I-have-a-dream struggle does continue trying to overcome prejudiced one-way voting expression. Enhance your credibility by making sure you develop enough remedial initiative to secure simplistic voter ID to exhibit such dynamic diversity. If the biased balloting ceased, the emancipation could be profiled online at www.blackpeoplefeat.com rather than wasting energy stalking Paula Deen. With respect to stark percentages, check out the Department of Justice's annual Victimization Report showing blacks committing more than half of the violent crimes against whites while whites commit only a few percent of the violent crimes against blacks.

  • Don't become "a terrible husband" like many promiscuous NBA players or infatuated with 72 virgins via Islamic martyrdom no matter how many condoms you can freely secure from a public school to mingle with a two-bit twerker. After all, "A Father First" divorce settlement in the "War on Women" can cost you in excess of $5 million. Records are made to be broken but don't get on the dead-beat "BabyDaddies" list of multiple illegitimate children with irresponsible Sperminators Kenny Anderson, Willie Anderson, Jason Caffey, Dwight Howard, Larry Johnson, Shawn Kemp, Calvin Murphy, Clifford Rozier, Scott Skiles, Latrell Sprewell, Royce White, etc. Moreover, don't be as shamelessly reality-show shallow as Lamar Odom, a Heat teammate in 2003-04 when Wade was a rookie, and marry, however briefly, a no-talent Left Coast celebrity only a month after meeting her Kardashian can and/or clan. There is also something to be said for not duplicating the entitlement rudeness of hip-hop "artist" Kanye West when interrupting singer Taylor Swift's awards acceptance speech or exhibiting a mite more class than Seattle Seahawks defensive back Roger Sherman following a Super Bowl-bound victory.

  • Do show respect for the opposite sex and sanctity of life by not contributing to more than 70% unwed mothers in the black community. Examine why FBI crime statistics show blacks raping several thousand white women annually while white-on-black rapes number between "0.0" and "sample based on 10 or fewer" (see Chapter 11 of "Mugged"). And if you say you're pro-little guy (such as highly-motivated work force seeking to double wages in their "career" at McDonalds); then "choose" to support the ultimate little guy (baby in a womb). If not black-on-black crime, where are the marches to curtail the barbaric Planned Murderhood genocide of nearly 1,900 black baby abortions per day? A precise definition of blind-eye targeting is when 13% of the nation's population look like the serial-killer nurse from Houston undergoing 35% of all abhorrent abortions. How low can we sink as a society if the remainder of the country ever becomes like New York City where more black babies are killed by abortion than are born there? Incredibly, the New York Slimes was hailed by lib-nut bloodthirsty bloggers when Wade's teammate, Udonis Haslem, and his wife were depicted as courageous for challenging the "persistent abortion stigma that's deeply ingrained in our society."

  • Don't besmirch Kobe Bryant for failing to toe the solidarity line and don't associate extensively with "We Be New School People" who can't read cursive or speak English properly (eloquent to MSLSD's not-so-sharp ton of tampon-earring misfits and "clever" editing). Unless, of course, you've undergone sensitivity training and helping someone with a genuine learning disability (whether or not they're a homophobic perjurer).

  • Do stand your moral ground following these ethical principles so your personal responsibility will significantly decrease the odds you'll end up with a suspect legacy like slain Martin and Brown or the chronic whiners exploiting tragedy on dopey ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and MSLSD.

Wade is good at playing on both ends of the court. Thus he could play both sides of the lecture fence comparable to lunatic liberal activists condemning demented Demorat sexual escapades after the same enablers staunchly defended Sick Willie, the self-styled first black POTUS, for similar political-theatre bozo behavior. At the very least, any perceived problem could be blamed by genuine racial rodeo clowns on George Dubya, global warming, the Australian catcher for East Central (Okla.) murdered by human debris when shot in the back by hate-crime valueless scum while jogging or the white student "justifiably" assaulted on a Florida bus by three black teens for alleged drug ratting. Hopefully, Wade won't also take up the mantle of the "stop snitchin'" movement like Syracuse All-American Carmelo Anthony, who appeared in an underground DVD circulated in his hometown of Baltimore in 2004 encouraging those individuals questioned by the police to refuse to "snitch" on drug dealers and other criminals.

Encumbered by loathsome leftist leaders, we see low-life decay from sea (fatally shooting baby in a stroller in coastal GA, 14-year-old murdering his MA math teacher with a box cutter and slaughtering civilians at a Navy complex in nation's capitol) to dying sea (beating WWII veteran to death with flashlight in Washington state after he survived Okinawa). The so-called leaders with a deficit in character content 50 years removed from MLK mooch off vet Shorty's sacrifice but probably never would mention him unless it was for gun-control purposes if he had tried to defend his "welfare" with a weapon.

Where are the arrogant activists when it comes to black-on-black crime? Are the black thrill killers in Oklahoma also going to be portrayed as possible bored sons of POTUS as he "takes us to darker places"? Would Aaron Alexis have been in a healthier state of mind if he simply drank more water, ate more organic food and participated regularly in "Let's Move" exercises? Will wise Wade or any of the race-card charlatans show solidarity with a Melbourne mom by having him and his sons don a catcher's mask for a magazine cover shot or math flash cards supporting the young MA math teacher or Naval gear honoring the D.C. deceased? Integrity questions to ponder after shedding authentic "Be Like Mike" mementos and trying to learn how to put on a "Hands Up, Don't Loot" hoodie (not made from white sheets contrary to rumors stemming from legal vultures descending upon Brown household).

Also, here's a novel thought: How about not protesting about any curfew by simply getting a good night's sleep to either function better the next day as a student or parent or employee? Unless, of course, none of those venues mean as much to you as a contrived definition of assassinating character after a surveillance video clearly defines an individual ruining his own character.

Charter Schools: Maryland Joins Big Ten After Settling ACC Exit-Fee Suit

"Each generation wants new symbols, new people, new names. They want to divorce themselves from their predecessors." - Jim Morrison

Nothing lasts forever. No university ever has discarded such a longstanding affiliation with a conference as Maryland did when the Terrapins chose to divorce the ACC for wealthier Big Ten. The Terps jettisoned 61 years of history when they aligned with the Big Ten, which is the only alliance other than the Ivy League never to have a member leave to join another major conference.

Maryland can formally make the switch after settling an exit-fee money mess with the ACC for $31.362 million. The ACC seemed hypocritical in suing the Terps) after allegedly targeting at least two unidentified Big Ten schools to leave after learning about Maryland's intent to seek "greener" pastures. But the chances of a "bullying" power league school resisting a race chasing the almighty dollar is about the same as one of the clueless clowns in riot-ridden Ferguson, Mo., looting a library to stimulate brainpower or strive to raise standard of living before, while or after Rev. Sharpnado munches on honky following descending upon St. Louis with his frequently rehearsed "Resist We Much" race-hustling message. If it isn't black-on-black crime, then the agenda-driven DOJ seeks to suppress video surveillance of vandalism and chants led by NotsoSharpton or Jesse Jerkson probably should be: "No (Free) Cigars. No Peace!"

Hopefully, the ACC will invest its hefty settlement in addressing academics amid North Carolina's shoddy scholastic standing emphasizing Afro-American Studies and similar such shenanigans. If a university with Carolina's stature has lost its higher education "way" suspending research of reading specialist/academic adviser allegedly facing death threats, then what the fraud is happening regarding unsupervised lower standards at other ACC institutions and power leagues across the nation? For instance, N.C. State hired Sidney Lowe as coach before he even earned his diploma more than 20 years after leaving the school and subsequently showing apparent evasion taking any modestly-taxing classes such as ethics or tax preparation while in college playing under Jim Valvano.

Fordham, fleeing the Metro Atlantic and Patriot League the first half of the 1990s, is the only institution to twice be in this charter-school departure category. Following is a list from longest to shortest tenures of the first schools to leave an intact league for another conference after being a founding member:

Founding Member (Years) Original League Tenure Next League 1st Season
Maryland (61) Atlantic Coast 1954-2014 Big Ten 2015
Boston College (26) Big East 1980-2005 Atlantic Coast 2006
St. Joseph's and Temple (24) East Coast 1959-82 Atlantic 10 1983
Arkansas State (19) Southland 1969-87 American South 1988
San Jose State (17) West Coast Athletic 1953-69 PCAA 1970
Arizona and Arizona State (16) Western Athletic 1963-78 Pacific-10 1979
Gonzaga (16) Big Sky 1964-79 West Coast Athletic 1980
Missouri and Texas A&M (16) Big 12 1997-2012 Southeastern 2013
Brigham Young and Utah (12) Mountain West 2000-11 West Coast and Pac-12 2012
San Diego State (9) Big West 1970-78 Western Athletic 1979
Army and Fordham (9) Metro Atlantic 1982-90 Patriot League 1991
Navy (9) ECAC South/Colonial Athletic 1983-91 Patriot League 1992
Campbell (9) Big South 1986-94 Trans America Athletic 1995
SW Missouri State (8) Mid-Continent 1983-90 Missouri Valley 1991
Pittsburgh (6) Eastern 8 1977-82 Big East 1983
Fordham (5) Patriot League 1991-95 Atlantic 10 1996
Marshall (4) Ohio Valley 1949-52 Mid-American 1954
Georgia Tech (3) Metro 1976-78 Atlantic Coast 1980
Northeast Louisiana (3) Trans America Athletic 1980-82 Southland 1983
Rhode Island (1) ECAC North 1980 Eastern 8 1981
Towson State (1) Northeast 1982 East Coast 1983
Louisville and Rutgers (1) American Athletic 2014 ACC and Big Ten 2015

NOTES: Cincinnati (member of Mid-American from 1947-53), Georgia Tech (SEC from 1933-64), New Orleans (Sun Belt from 1977-80), Oral Roberts (Midwestern City from 1980-87), Penn State (ECBL/Eastern 8 from 1977-79), Rutgers (Middle Atlantic from 1959-62) and South Carolina (ACC from 1954-71) joined the independent ranks the next season. . . . Seven C-USA charter members joined other leagues following their 10th year in the league in 2004-05. . . . Campbell rejoined Big South in 2011-12.

From Peon to Pedestal: Small-College Stars Still Shine at Big-Time Level

Niagara coach Chris Casey hopes guard Emile Blackman continues to make the progress he displayed at the end of the 2012-13 campaign before tagging along with his coach from LIU Post. In his last six small-college games, Blackman averaged 16.8 ppg and 4.8 rpg while shooting 52% from the floor and nearly 58% on three-pointers. Niagara struck small-school lightning at the turn of the 21st Century when Mercyhurst (Pa.) transfer Demond Stewart became Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference MVP in 2000-01.

Despite what you might read elsewhere, a striking number of major-college standouts started their careers playing for a four-year small college before transferring. Of course, the most prominent player in this category is all-time great Elgin Baylor. After leaving College of Idaho, Baylor became an NCAA unanimous first-team All-American with Seattle in 1957-58.

More than 30 different players became NCAA Division I conference all-league selections in the 1980s and 1990s after beginning their careers with a small four-year college. In 2013-14, Weber State swingman Davion Berry (transfer from Cal State Monterey Bay) became the fourth player thus far in the 21st Century to earn MVP honors in a DI league after transferring from a small college.

Michigan recently added forward Duncan Robinson from Williams (Mass.) but the odds are against him making a huge impact in a power conference similar to what Gerald Glass did in the SEC for Ole Miss after departing Delta State. Who will be next player to join the following chronological list of first-team all-conference selections since the NCAA playoffs expanded to at least 64 teams in 1985 after starting their college careers playing for non-Division I four-year schools?

Season First-Team Selection Pos. Division I School Conference Four-Year Small College
1984-85 Curtis High G Nevada-Reno Big Sky Tennessee-Martin
1984-85 Jim McCaffrey G Holy Cross Metro Atlantic St. Michael's (Vt.)
1984-85 Bob McCann C Morehead State Ohio Valley Upsala (N.J.)
1985-86 Oscar Jones G Delaware East Coast Winston-Salem State (N.C.)
1985-86 Jim McCaffrey G Holy Cross Metro Atlantic St. Michael's (Vt.)
1985-86 Bob McCann C Morehead State Ohio Valley Upsala (N.J.)
1985-86 Jerry Stroman F Utah Western Athletic Benedict (S.C.)
1986-87 Marchell Henry F East Carolina Colonial Athletic St. Andrews (N.C.)
1986-87 Avery Johnson G Southern (La.) SWAC Cameron (Okla.)
1986-87 Bob McCann* C Morehead State Ohio Valley Upsala (N.J.)
1986-87 Ron Simpson F Rider East Coast Adelphi (N.Y.)
1987-88 Avery Johnson* G Southern (La.) SWAC Cameron (Okla.)
1987-88 Larry Jones* F Boston University ECAC North Atlantic C.W. Post (N.Y.)
1988-89 Gerald Glass F Mississippi SEC Delta State (Miss.)
1989-90 Gerald Glass F Mississippi SEC Delta State (Miss.)
1990-91 Marcus Kennedy* F-C Eastern Michigan Mid-American Ferris State (Mich.)
1990-91 Tony Walker F Saint Peter's Metro Atlantic Kean College (N.J.)
1992-93 Leon McGee G Western Michigan Mid-American Michigan Tech
1993-94 Tucker Neale* G Colgate Patriot League Ashland (Ohio)
1994-95 Tucker Neale G Colgate Patriot League Ashland (Ohio)
1995-96 Johnny Taylor F UT-Chattanooga Southern Knoxville (Tenn.)
1996-97 Johnny Taylor* F UT-Chattanooga Southern Knoxville (Tenn.)
1996-97 Raymond Tutt G UC Santa Barbara Big West Azusa Pacific (Calif.)
1997-98 Andrew Betts C Long Beach State Big West C.W. Post (N.Y.)
1997-98 Chad Townsend G Murray State Ohio Valley St. Edward's (Tex.)
1999-00 Matt Gladieux G Coastal Carolina Big South Bellarmine (Ky.)
2000-01 Demond Stewart* G Niagara Metro Atlantic Mercyhurst (Pa.)
2001-02 Justin Rowe C Maine America East Clearwater Christian (Fla.)
2003-04 Miah Davis* G Pacific Big West Cal State Stanislaus
2004-05 Yemi Nicholson* C Denver Sun Belt Fort Lewis (Colo.)
2012-13 Davion Berry G-F Weber State Big Sky Cal State Monterey Bay
2013-14 Davion Berry* G-F Weber State Big Sky Cal State Monterey Bay

*Ten of these players were named conference MVP.
NOTE: Tennessee-Martin subsequently moved up to the DI level.

Classic Rivalries: Hoyas/Orange, Zags/Huskies and Demons/Wildcats Join List

"Holy shadows of the dead, I am not to blame for your cruel and bitter fate, but the accursed rivalry which brought sister nations and brother people to fight one another. I do not feel happy for this victory of mine. On the contrary, I would be glad, brothers, if I had all of you standing here next to me, since we are united by the same language, the same blood and the same visions." - Alexander the Great

After 105 years steeped in history amid off-the-chart contempt, the rivalry between Kansas and Missouri expired for the foreseeable future when Mizzou departed the Big 12 Conference for the SEC. KU has a commanding edge in nearly every category (winning percentage, victories away from home and close games decided by single digits), but the Tigers have been enough of a tormentor to make the series as energetic and entertaining as you can find anywhere. Their border war stacked right up there with the more nationally-acclaimed "Clash of the Titans" between Duke and North Carolina.

Making about as much sense as Dennis Rodman becoming the de facto U.S. ambassador to North Korea, it was shortsighted of KU and Mizzou to let their rivalry end. They simply join top six conference members DePaul/Illinois, Maryland/Georgetown and Cincinnati/Ohio State as potentially great natural non-league match-ups that their fans can't enjoy. At least Georgetown/Syracuse, Gonzaga/Washington and DePaul/Northwestern have seen the light and will resume their must-see games in the not-too-distant future.

If bruised egos heal in the near future, perhaps sounder minds will prevail with Mizzou annually opposing KU in Kansas City much like it does in St. Louis against Illinois. But Mizzou can't complain if the Jayhawks continue to act like a jilted lover because the self-centered Tigers fail to oppose competent in-state foes such as Missouri State and Saint Louis.

By almost any measure including Alexander the Great's input, KU has a superior program to Mizzou. But Jayhawks coach Bill Self should rein in his rhetoric as the divorce dialogue intensified or at least take a crash course in college basketball history. When comparing the significance of the Kentucky/Louisville rivalry to the termination of KU's home-and-home conference conflicts with the Tigers, Self said: "Well, they've always played every year (out of league). That's all they know."

Well, Self needs to "always know" that UK and Louisville went 61 years from 1923 through 1983 without a regular-season matchup before they came to their senses and saw the light. Speaking of light, KU and Mizzou simply have to shed one lightweight apiece to keep a good thing going for the sport in general and for their fans specifically like the entertaining Philly Big 5. KU shouldn't also deny hoop fans a Top 20 matchup with Wichita State.

By toning down picking on patsies, there is plenty of room on their respective non-league schedules to keep playing each other. Ditto for Indiana and Kentucky plus Memphis and Tennessee resuming their rivalries, which would definitely be among the top 10 such confronations in the country. If the century-old KU/Mizzou spectacle returns, it could immediately surpass Kentucky/Louisville and go atop the following list of the nation's top 25 non-conference rivalries if only because of longevity:

  1. Kentucky/Louisville
  2. Illinois/Missouri
  3. Cincinnati/Xavier
  4. Georgetown/Syracuse
  5. Indiana/Notre Dame
  6. Brigham Young/Utah
  7. Iowa/Iowa State
  8. St. Joseph's/Villanova
  9. Georgia/Georgia Tech
  10. Florida/Florida State
  11. Clemson/South Carolina
  12. Marquette/Wisconsin
  13. New Mexico/New Mexico State
  14. Utah/Utah State
  15. Temple/Villanova
  16. La Salle/Villanova
  17. Florida/Miami (FL)
  18. Iowa/Northern Iowa
  19. Colorado/Colorado State
  20. Drake/Iowa
  21. Penn/Villanova
  22. Providence/Rhode Island
  23. Creighton/Nebraska
  24. Gonzaga/Washington
  25. DePaul/Northwestern

Tackling College Basketball's Hard-Hitting Connection to NFL Hall of Fame

College basketball boasts a significant presence during the Pro Football Hall of Fame enshrinement weekend in Canton, Ohio. The following alphabetical list of former college hoopsters comprise more than 10% of the HOF members:

DOUG ATKINS, Tennessee
Member of College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. Eight-time Pro Bowl participant played 17 NFL seasons (1953 through 1969) as a defensive end with the Cleveland Browns, Chicago Bears and New Orleans Saints. He was a first-round NFL draft selection (11th pick overall) after competing in two Cotton Bowls and one Sugar Bowl. . . . Atkins originally enrolled on a basketball scholarship at Tennessee, where he played one season of varsity basketball before concentrating on football. The 6-5, 210-pound center averaged 9.9 points per game for the 1950-51 Volunteers, ranking third on the team in scoring. He was selected by the Minneapolis Lakers in the 1953 NBA draft.

MORRIS "RED" BADGRO, Southern California
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame was an offensive and defensive end with the New York Yankees (1927 and 1928), New York Giants (1930 through 1935) and Brooklyn Dodgers (1936) in a nine-year NFL career that was interrupted by a stint in major league baseball. Hit .257 in two seasons (1929 and 1930) as an outfielder with the St. Louis Browns after becoming a three-time All-Pro with the Giants. . . . Earned varsity basketball letters for the Trojans in 1924-25 and 1926-27. Named to the first five on the All-Pacific Coast Conference team as a forward in 1926-27 when he was USC's MVP.

CLIFF BATTLES, West Virginia Wesleyan College
Halfback became member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Led the NFL in rushing as a rookie with Boston in 1932 and in his final season with Washington in 1937. First NFL player to rush for 200 yards in a game (215 yards in 16 carries for the Boston Redskins against the New York Giants in 1933). . . . The 6-1, 195-pounder played four seasons of varsity basketball in college.

SAMMY BAUGH, Texas Christian
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame is considered by many as the finest quarterback in history. Consensus All-American in 1936. Passed for 21,886 yards and 186 touchdowns in 16 years (1937 through 1952) with the Washington Redskins. First-round pick led the NFL in passing five times, in punting five times and in pass interceptions once. Five-time All-Pro participant held almost all of the NFL's passing records when he retired. His 44-yard gallop was the longest run from scrimmage in a 3-2 victory over LSU in the 1936 Sugar Bowl before helping the Horned Frogs defeat Marquette, 16-6, in the 1937 Cotton Bowl. . . . Three-year letterman in basketball at TCU was an honorable mention selection on the All-Southwest Conference team as a senior in 1936-37.

BOBBY BELL, Minnesota
Member of the College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was a consensus All-American choice as a tackle and winner of the Outland Award as the nation's outstanding interior lineman in 1962. Selected in the seventh round of the 1963 AFL draft by the Dallas Texans. As a linebacker, the nine-time All-Pro selection intercepted 25 passes in his 12-year career with the Kansas City Chiefs. Bell played in two Super Bowls (I and IV). . . . He became the first African-American basketball player for Minnesota when he appeared in three games in the 1960-61 season, collecting four points and four rebounds.

JIM BROWN, Syracuse
Movie actor is member of College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. Earned All-American honors in football and lacrosse. Averaged 6.2 yards per carry as a senior in 1956 and scored 43 points in a game against Colgate. Co-MVP in 1957 Cotton Bowl. The first-round draft choice established NFL career records for yards rushing (12,312), rushing attempts (2,359), rushing average (5.2 per carry), touchdowns (126) and years leading league in rushing (eight) in his nine seasons (1957 through 1965) with the Cleveland Browns. Nine-time Pro Bowl selection. . . . Averaged 14 ppg for the Orangemen basketball team as a sophomore and 11.3 as a junior. He is reluctant to specifically say why he quit the team before his senior season when Syracuse participated in the NCAA Tournament for the first time, but indicated it was because of a racial quota. "Well, they basically didn't want to start more than two blacks (Vinnie Cohen and Manny Breland) although nobody could outrun, outjump or outshoot me," said Brown, who was selected in the ninth round of the 1957 NBA draft by the Syracuse Nationals. "It really was a tragedy the way athletics were handled there at the time," said Cohen, who went on to become a Washington, D.C., lawyer for 40 years. Excerpt from school guide: "Brownie is a powerfully built youth, who helps under the boards, and is an excellent shot as well." His son Jimmy, a two-time All-MEAC first-team selection, played for three NCAA Tournament teams with North Carolina A&T from 1983 through 1985 after transferring from Southern Cal and was the Aggies' leading scorer as a senior with 18.2 ppg.

JUNIOUS "BUCK" BUCHANAN, Grambling
Pro Football Hall of Famer was the first pick overall in the 1962 AFL draft by the Dallas Texans. The 6-7, 285-pound defensive tackle missed only one game because of injury in his 13-year pro career, which included a streak of eight consecutive seasons being named to either the AFL All-Star Team or NFL Pro Bowl. Instrumental in the Kansas City Chiefs' victory over the heavily-favored Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl IV. . . . Concentrated solely on football after earning a basketball letter as a freshman in 1958-59. Buchanan and teammate Ernie Ladd both intended on only playing basketball for Grambling before legendary coach Eddie Robinson kept both from transferring by allegedly giving them a key to the cafeteria's kitchen so they could go there and eat whenever they were hungry if the pair would come out for the football squad.

EARL "DUTCH" CLARK, Colorado College
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Halfback and quarterback was named to All-NFL team in six of his seven seasons with Portsmouth (1931 and 1932) and Detroit (1934 through 1938). Led the NFL in scoring in 1932, 1935 and 1936. Player-coach of Detroit in 1937 and 1938) and head coach of Cleveland Rams from 1939 through 1942. First-team QB on the 1928 AP All-American team. Scored at least one touchdown in 21 consecutive college football games. . . . The 6-0, 180-pounder was an All-Rocky Mountain Conference choice in basketball all four seasons (first team as a freshman and senior, second team as a junior and third team as a sophomore). Sketch in Spalding Official Guide: "There isn't a man who could match Clark as a floor guard. The best dribbler ever to bounce a ball in the conference."

GEORGE CONNOR, Holy Cross/Notre Dame
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame was Outland Trophy winner (outstanding interior lineman) as a tackle on Notre Dame's 1946 national championship team. Consensus All-American football choice in 1946 and 1947. Earned All-America honors as a tackle at Holy Cross in 1943 before transferring to Notre Dame. First-round draft choice by the New York Giants in 1946 (5th pick overall). Played offensive/defensive tackle and linebacker with the Chicago Bears for eight years from 1948 through 1955, earning All-NFL first-team honors from 1949 through 1953. . . . Averaged 2.5 points per game as a 6-3, 225-pound center on the Irish's 1946-47 basketball team. Basketball letterman with Holy Cross in 1943 and 1944.

LEN DAWSON, Purdue
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame completed 2,136 passes for 28,731 yards and 239 touchdowns in 19 seasons (1957 through 1975) with the Cleveland Browns, Dallas Texans and Kansas City Chiefs. First-round draft choice of the Pittsburgh Steelers went on to become a seven-time All-Pro. Quarterbacked the Chiefs to victory over Minnesota in Super Bowl following 1969 season. . . . Played in two games as a 6-0, 180-pound guard for Purdue's basketball team in the 1956-57 campaign.

MIKE DITKA, Pittsburgh
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. The tight end caught 427 passes for 5,812 yards and 43 touchdowns in 12 NFL seasons (1961 through 1972) with the Chicago Bears, Philadelphia Eagles and Dallas Cowboys. The first-round draft choice participated in two Super Bowls with Dallas (V and VI) after playing five Pro Bowls with the Bears (1962 through 1966). Coached Super Bowl winner in 1985 season when the Bears compiled an 18-1 overall record. Registered a 112-68 mark in 11 years (1982-92) as coach of the Bears. Coached the New Orleans Saints in the late 1990s between stints as a network analyst. . . . The 6-2, 205-pound forward averaged 2.8 points and 2.6 rebounds per game in two seasons with the Panthers (1958-59 and 1959-60) after playing in high school under Press Maravich, the father of Pete Maravich, the NCAA's all-time leading scorer. Sketch in school basketball guide: "A natural athlete who never quits. If Pitt wins a few games, there is a good chance he will be in the thick of things."

WILBUR "WEEB" EWBANK, Miami (Ohio)
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame is the only head coach to win championships in both the NFL (Baltimore Colts in 1958 and 1959) and AFL (New York Jets in 1968). . . . Two-year basketball letterman for Miami (1926-27 and 1927-28) compiled a 5-13 record as head basketball coach at his alma mater in 1938-39 and an 8-12 mark as Brown's head basketball coach in 1946-47.

OTTO GRAHAM, Northwestern
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Quarterback earned All-American honors and finished third in Heisman Trophy voting as a senior in 1943. First-round draft choice of the Detroit Lions in 1944 (4th pick overall). Played 10 seasons (1946 through 1955) with the Cleveland Browns and quarterbacked team to championship game each year (All-America Football Conference from 1946 through 1949 and NFL from 1950 through 1955). Compiled a 105-17-4 playing record in regular-season pro competition, completing 1,464 of 2,626 passes for 23,584 yards and 174 touchdowns. Five-time Pro Bowl selection (1951 through 1955). Compiled a 17-22-3 record as coach of the Washington Redskins in three years from 1966 through 1968. . . . Played three seasons of varsity basketball, finishing second in the Big Ten Conference in scoring as a sophomore (13.1 ppg) and as a junior (15.8). The 6-0 forward earned second-team All-Big Ten honors in 1941-42 and first five honors in 1942-43. Also played for Colgate as a senior. NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1944 and second-team All-American in 1943. Left Northwestern with the highest scoring total in school history with more than 600 points. Played one season with the Rochester Royals in the National Basketball League, averaging 5.2 points per game for the 1945-46 squad that won the NBL title.

HARRY "BUD" GRANT, Minnesota
Former NFL and CFL end and coach. First-round choice by the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1950 NFL draft. Played with Philadelphia in 1951 and 1952 and Winnipeg of the CFL from 1953 through 1956. Caught 272 passes for 4,197 yards and 20 touchdowns in six pro seasons, leading the CFL in pass receptions in 1953 (with 68), 1954 (49) and 1956 (63). Coached Winnipeg in the CFL (1957-66) and Minnesota in the NFL (1967-85). Coach of four CFL champions and four NFL Super Bowl teams. . . . Third-leading scorer for the Gophers' basketball squad in 1948-49 (8.5 ppg) after being named team MVP the previous season over first-team All-American Jim McIntyre. Finished 13th in the Big Ten Conference in scoring in 1946-47 with a 9.3 average. Played two seasons in the NBA, including a rookie year when he was a member of the Lakers' 1950 championship team.

GEORGE HALAS, Illinois
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame compiled a 324-151-31 record as an NFL coach, guiding the Chicago Bears to seven NFL titles. His 40-year NFL coaching career also included stints with the Decatur/Chicago Staleys. MVP of the 1919 Rose Bowl as an end for Great Lakes. . . . The 6-0, 175-pound Halas, known for his gritty defense, was a starting guard for the Illini team that won the Big Ten Conference basketball title in 1916-17 with a 10-2 record. He was captain of the squad the next season before entering the armed forces in mid-January. He was also an outfielder in 12 games for the New York Yankees in 1919.

MEL HEIN, Washington State
Hall of Fame charter member played with the New York Giants for 15 years from 1931 through 1945. In 1994, Hein was named to the NFL's all-time 75-year anniversary team. Eight-time All-NFL center scored a touchdown in 1938 when he was named the league's MVP. In college, he intercepted eight passes in a game against Idaho. . . . The 6-2, 220-pounder was a basketball letterman in 1930 after leading WSU to a Rose Bowl bid. He was supervisor of officials for the American Football Conference of the NFL until his retirement.

ELROY "CRAZY LEGS" HIRSCH, Wisconsin/Michigan
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. First-round draft choice by Cleveland in 1945 (5th pick overall). Played halfback, defensive back and offensive end as a pro with the Chicago Rockets of the All-America Football Conference from 1946 through 1948 and Los Angeles Rams of the NFL from 1949 through 1957. Caught 387 passes and scored 66 touchdowns as a pro. Played in four NFL championship games. Held the Rams' team record for most touchdown receptions for almost 40 years until it was broken by Isaac Bruce in 2001. . . . Starting center for the Wolverines' basketball team in 1944 while undergoing military training there. Sketch in Michigan guide: "Naval transfer from Wisconsin was a big aid, chiefly through his flaming competitive spirit."

PAUL HORNUNG, Notre Dame
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame earned All-American honors as a quarterback in 1955 and 1956. Only Heisman Trophy winner to play for a losing team (2-8 as a senior). First pick overall in the NFL draft as a bonus selection. Played nine seasons as a halfback/placekicker with the Green Bay Packers, leading the NFL in scoring in 1959, 1960 and 1961. He rushed for 3,711 yards and 50 touchdowns and caught 130 passes for 1,480 yards and 12 touchdowns. Played in five NFL championship games and two Pro Bowls (1960 and 1961). . . . Played varsity basketball for the Irish as a sophomore, averaging 6.1 points per game in 10 contests. Wrote Hornung in his autobiography Golden Boy: "(Coach Johnny) Jordan liked to tip a few, and sometimes, on the road, he'd take me out drinking with him. He could do that because I wasn't on basketball scholarship."

MARV LEVY, Coe (Iowa)
Hall of Famer (elected in 2001) compiled a 143-112 record as coach of the Kansas City Chiefs (1978-82) and Buffalo Bills (1986-97). He had a 17-5 mark against Don Shula, the winningest coach in NFL history. Posted an 11-8 postseason mark with the Bills en route to becoming the only NFL coach to win four consecutive league or conference championships. But he lost four straight Super Bowls. He was special teams coach of the Washington Redskins' 1972 Super Bowl entrant. Also served as head coach for three colleges--New Mexico (14-6 record in two years in 1958 and 1959), California (8-29-3 record in four years from 1960 through 1963) and William & Mary (23-25-2 in five years from 1964 through 1968). . . . Coached basketball one season for his alma mater in 1955-56. The team compiled a 20-5 record, won the Midwest Collegiate Conference with a 14-2 mark and lost to Stephen F. Austin, 74-62, in the first round of the NAIA Tournament. Levy earned a basketball letter with the 1949-50 Coe squad that posted a 3-14 mark.

RONNIE LOTT, Southern California
Unanimous All-American defensive back played 15 seasons in the NFL with the San Francisco 49ers, Los Angeles Raiders, New York Jets and Kansas City Chiefs (1981 through 1995). Intercepted 14 passes for the Trojans (two for touchdowns) before intercepting 63 passes in regular-season NFL competition and nine in the postseason. First-round draft choice played in 10 Pro Bowl games and four Super Bowls. . . . Collected nine assists, four points and three rebounds in six games for the Trojans' basketball squad as a junior in 1979-80.

JOHN MACKEY, Syracuse
Three-time All-Pro tight end became an NFL Hall of Famer after being a second-round draft choice by the Baltimore Colts in 1963. The 6-2, 220-pounder caught 331 passes for 5,236 yards and 38 touchdowns in 10 seasons. Six of his nine TD catches in 1966 came on plays of more than 50 yards. He grabbed a deflected pass from Johnny Unitas for a 75-yard TD in Super Bowl V after having three pass receptions in Super Bowl III. . . . Mackey collected 28 points and 28 rebounds in six basketball games with the Orangemen in 1960-61.

GEORGE MUSSO, Millikin (Ill.)
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame played for seven divisional winners and four NFL title teams. The 6-2, 270-pound guard and tackle played for 12 seasons (1933 through 1944) with the Chicago Bears. As a collegian, he played against future President Ronald Reagan, who attended Eureka. As a member of the Bears in 1935, Musso played against future President Gerald Ford in the Bears-College All-Star Game in Chicago. . . . Three-year basketball letterman in college.

EARLE "GREASY" NEALE, West Virginia Wesleyan College
Pro Football Hall of Famer compiled a 63-43 record as coach of the Philadelphia Eagles for 10 years from 1941 through 1950, winning back-to-back NFL titles by shutting out their opponents in championship games in 1948 and 1949. Guided Washington and Jefferson (Pa.) to the 1922 Rose Bowl before coaching Virginia and West Virginia. He starred as an end on Jim Thorpe's pre-World War I Canton Bulldogs. Also played as a major league outfielder with the Cincinnati Reds for eight years from 1916 to 1924, hitting .357 in the infamous "Black Sox" 1919 World Series. . . . Class of 1915 at WVWC.

ERNIE NEVERS, Stanford
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. He was a consensus All-American selection as a senior fullback in 1925 before rushing for 37 touchdowns in five NFL seasons with the Duluth Eskimos (1926 and 1927) and Chicago Cardinals (1929 through 1931). Set NFL record with a 40-point game against the Chicago Bears in 1929. Co-MVP of the 1925 Rose Bowl. . . . Compiled a 6-12 pitching record in three seasons (1926 through 1928) with the St. Louis Browns. He yielded two of Babe Ruth's record-tying 60 home runs in 1927. . . . Lettered in basketball for Stanford as a sophomore and junior. Named to the All-Pacific Coast Conference second five as a junior in 1924-25. Historians say he was a fine shooter, an excellent dribbler, tough on defense, and generally a terrifying figure for the opposition. The Spalding Basketball Guide said: "He is almost as good a basketball player as he is a football star. With his speed, weight and general all-around ability, he was a stellar performer."

CLARENCE "ACE" PARKER, Duke
College Hall of Famer led the Blue Devils to a three-year record of 24-5 in the mid-1930s, serving as team captain in his final season in 1936 when they went 9-1. After playing a variety of positions (quarterback, tailback, defensive back and punter), was a second-round choice in the 1937 NFL draft (13th overall). Passed for 3,935 yards and 22 touchdowns, rushed for 1,108 yards and 10 TDs and punted for a 39.5-yard average with the Brooklyn Dodgers/Boston Yanks in six years from 1937 through 1941 and 1945. Three-time consensus All-Pro led the NFL in passing yards in 1938 with 865. He paced the league with six interceptions in 1940 when he was named NFL Most Valuable Player. . . . Basketball letterman for the Blue Devils in 1935-36. Also played major league baseball with the Philadelphia Athletics.

ART SHELL, Maryland-Eastern Shore
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame was head coach of the Los Angeles Raiders for six years from 1989 through 1994. Offensive tackle for the Raiders from 1968 through 1982 played in eight Pro Bowls (1973 through 1979 and 1981) after being picked in the third round. Participated in Super Bowls XI and XV. . . . Two-year basketball letterman as a 6-5, 265-pound center at school that was then known as Maryland State College. Sketch from school guide: "Pure muscle. Amazing agility. Uncompromising under the boards, nobody pushes big Art without a battle."

ROGER STAUBACH, Navy
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame won Heisman Trophy in 1963. Passed for 3,571 yards and rushed for 682 in his career at Navy (1962 through 1964). Quarterback in four Super Bowls during his 11 seasons with the Dallas Cowboys. Six-time Pro Bowl selection passed for 22,700 yards and 153 touchdowns after being a 10th-round draft choice in 1964. . . . Averaged 9.3 ppg for the 1961-62 Navy plebe (freshman) basketball team. The 6-2, 190-pound forward scored five points in four games for Midshipmen varsity squad the next season.

JOE STYDAHAR, West Virginia
Member of College Football and Pro Football Halls of Fame. Earned All-American honors as a 6-4, 230-pound tackle in 1935. Played nine seasons (1936 through 1942, 1945, and 1946) with the Chicago Bears after being their first-round pick in the first NFL draft. Named to All-NFL team four times from 1937 through 1940. Coached Los Angeles Rams (1950-51) and Chicago Cardinals (1953-54), leading Rams to 1951 NFL title. In 1934, he he set a school record with seven blocked punts, including three for touchdowns. Participated in both the East-West Shrine Game and College Football All-Star Game in Chicago. . . . Three-year basketball letterman was captain of the Mountaineers' 1934-35 team that compiled a 16-6 record. Selected as a center to the first five on West Virginia's Pre-World War II team that was named as part of the university's all-time basketball squad.

EMLEN TUNNELL, Toledo
Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame played in nine Pro Bowl games (1951 through 1958 and 1960). Defensive back established career records for interceptions (79), yards gained on interceptions (1,282) and yards gained on punt returns (2,209) in 14 seasons (1948 through 1961) with the New York Giants and Green Bay Packers. . . . The 6-1, 180-pound forward was a top reserve for the 1942-43 Toledo basketball team compiling a 22-4 record and finishing second in the NIT.

DOAK WALKER, Southern Methodist
Member of both the College Football and Pro Football Hall of Fame. SMU legend was a three-time All-American halfback and the school's only Heisman Trophy winner (as a junior in 1948). Finished third in Heisman voting in 1947 and 1949. Scored 38 touchdowns in his four-year SMU career, including two kickoff returns in 1947. Walker rushed for 1,928 yards in college, passed for 1,654, caught passes for 454 and returned eight interceptions for 176. He was also a punter and placekicker for the Mustangs. Co-MVP in back-to-back Cotton Bowls (1948 and 1949). First-round choice by the New York Bulldogs in the 1949 NFL draft (3rd pick overall). Walker rushed for 1,520 yards and 12 touchdowns in six years with the Detroit Lions (1950 through 1955), leading the NFL in scoring as a rookie (128 points) and in his final season (96). Member of NFL championship teams in 1952 and 1953 scored on a 62-yard run in the '52 title game. Five-time Pro Bowl selection (1951-52-54-55-56). . . . Walker was a basketball letterman in 1945-46 with SMU as a freshman.

LARRY RAYFIELD WRIGHT, Fort Valley State (Ga.)
Seventh-round draft choice played with the Dallas Cowboys for 13 years from 1967 through 1979. All-Pro offensive tackle six straight seasons from 1971 through 1976. Caught a touchdown pass as a tight end in 1968. Played in five Super Bowls (following 1970, 1971, 1975, 1977 and 1978 campaigns). . . . The 6-6, 245-pounder, an All-SIAC basketball player, averaged 17 ppg and 15 rpg as a junior and 21 ppg and 17.4 rpg as a senior.

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Headlines in August MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only four percent of active MLB players earned college diplomas.

Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an August calendar involving such versatile athletes:

AUGUST
1 - Chicago Cubs RF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) banged out four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1953. . . . Cleveland Indians 2B Bosey Berger (Maryland's first basketball All-American led Southern Conference in scoring in league competition in 1930-31) provided four hits, including three doubles, against the Chicago White Sox in 1935. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) incurred his only defeat (1-0 against the San Diego Padres) in 11 decisions from early June to mid-August en route to leading the N.L. in winning percentage in 1980. . . . Milwaukee Braves 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg in 1950-51 for Spring Hill AL) went 3-for-4 in both ends of a 1965 twinbill sweep of the San Francisco Giants. . . . Chicago Cubs INF Don Eaddy (averaged team-high 13.8 in Big Ten Conference competition as Michigan sophomore in 1952-53) fanned in his lone MLB plate appearance in 1959. . . . Philadelphia Athletics rookie 2B Gene Handley (Bradley letterman in 1932-33 and 1933-34) manufactured four hits against the Chicago White Sox in 1946. . . . In 1957, 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) hit his 13th career grand slam to set a new N.L. record. It was the final grand slam in the history of the Brooklyn franchise before the Dodgers moved to Los Angeles. . . . In 1913, New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) reached the 20-win plateau for the 11th consecutive season. . . . Hitless in his first six at-bats, RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) homered in the 16th inning to give the Detroit Tigers a 4-3 victory against the California Angels in 1971. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) posted his 200th triumph with a three-hit, 3-1 success at Chicago in 1958. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection led Oklahoma saved both ends of a 1965 doubleheader against the Chicago Cubs with three innings of scoreless relief in each contest. . . . Atlanta Braves P Cecil Upshaw (Centenary's leading scorer as junior in 1962-63) tossed nine innings of four-hit, scoreless relief to secure a 4-2 win against the New York Mets in 1968. . . . Boston Braves rookie RF Chuck Workman (two-time All-MIAA first-five selection was leading scorer when Central Missouri won inaugural NAIA Tournament in 1937) went 4-for-4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the opener of a 1943 twinbill.
2 - Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) hit for the cycle against the New York Yankees in 1933. . . . INF Tim Cullen (starting guard for Santa Clara in 1962-63 when he averaged 10 ppg) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Washington Senators for SS Ron Hansen in 1968. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) hammered three homers in an 11-0 victory against the Washington Senators in 1950. . . . Brooklyn Robins rookie 1B Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) went 4-for-4 against the Cincinnati Reds in the opener of a 1936 doubleheader. . . . P Cal Koonce (standout for Campbell in 1960 and 1961 when North Carolina-based school was a junior college) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the New York Mets in 1967. . . . P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) yielded 15 singles but the New York Giants still defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates, 8-4, in 1911. . . . Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) collected three hits and three stolen bases in a 3-2 win against the Chicago White Sox in 1974. . . . Milwaukee Braves 2B Mel Roach (averaged 9.3 ppg for Virginia in 1952-53) ripped homer in back-to-back games against the San Francisco Giants in 1958. . . . Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) fired as manager of the New York Yankees and succeeded by Billy Martin in 1975.
3 - Philadelphia Phillies P Gene Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as Washington State sophomore) hurled two innings of hitless relief for the N.L. in a 5-3 setback against the A.L. in the second 1959 All-Star Game. . . . SS Dick Culler (Little All-American in 1935 and 1936 with High Point, NC) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the New York Giants in 1948. . . . Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) fired as manager of the Oakland Athletics in 1967. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) garnered three hits for the third consecutive contest in 1930. . . . Boston Braves 1B Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) went 4-for-4 against the Cincinnati Reds in 1940. . . . Cleveland Indians SS Jack Kubiszyn (All-SEC first-team guard as senior averaged 18.3 ppg for Alabama from 1955-56 through 1957-58) connected for his lone MLB homer, accounting for the game's only run against the Kansas City Athletics in 1962. . . . P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) surrendered 15 hits in 10 innings but the New York Giants still defeated the Cincinnati Reds, 7-6, in 1909. . . . Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) dismissed as New York Yankees manager in 1982 after losing a doubleheader against the Chicago White Sox. . . . Montreal Expos OF Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman team in mid-1960s) secured the only hit off Bill Hands of the Chicago Cubs in the nightcap of a 1972 doubleheader. . . . In 1975, Kansas City Royals P Paul Splittorff (runner-up in scoring and rebounding in 1967-68 for Morningside IA) retired the last 26 Oakland Athletics batters while throwing one of his two career one-hitters.
4 - Cincinnati Reds CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) went 7-for-9 in a 1928 doubleheader against the New York Giants. . . . In 1961, Chicago Cubs OF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) became the first player ever to hit two homers in a single game off Los Angeles Dodgers Hall of Fame P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54). . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) banged out five hits against the Houston Astros in 1969. . . . California Angels LF Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70 averaged 7.4 ppg and 4 rpg) collected four hits and four runs in a 9-6 win against the Texas Rangers in 1976. . . . In 1971, St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) posted his 200th career victory. . . . San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81), securing at least five hits in a game for the fourth time in the 1993 season, stroked six safeties in an 11-10 triumph against the San Francisco Giants. . . . Brooklyn Robins 1B Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) had four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1937. . . . St. Louis Browns P Ernie Nevers (All-PCC second-five choice in 1924-25 for Stanford) hurled his first complete game, defeating the Philadelphia Athletics, 3-1, in 1926. . . . Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) stole three bases against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1979. . . . New York Mets 3B Ted Schreiber (played briefly for St. John's in 1957-58 under coach Joe Lapchick) supplied a career-high two hits when he singled in both at-bats against the Milwaukee Braves in 1963 before giving way to pinch-hitter Duke Snider. . . . Houston Colt .45s 2B Johnny Temple (played briefly in 1945 for Catawba, NC, before joining U.S. Navy) broke up Los Angeles Dodgers P Johnny Podres' bid for a no-hitter with a one-out, ninth-inning single in 1963. . . . While warming up prior to the fifth inning in a 1983 game at Toronto, New York Yankees OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) accidentally killed a seagull with a thrown ball. . . . New York Yankees P Tom Zachary (Guilford, NC, letterman in 1916) notched his seventh straight win with a shutout against the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a 1929 doubleheader.
5 - San Diego Padres P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) scored upon for the only time in a span of 19 relief appearances in 2008. . . . Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) collected two homers and five RBI for the third time in a 15-game span in 1962. . . . Baltimore Orioles OF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65) belted his second leadoff homer in two days in 1982. . . . OF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1960 NCAA playoff team) traded by the New York Mets to the Milwaukee Braves in 1965. . . . P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) purchased from the Oakland Athletics by the Chicago Cubs in 1977. . . . Posting one of his N.L.-leading five shutouts in 1950, New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) yielded a leadoff single before throttling the Pittsburgh Pirates the remainder of the way in a 5-0 whitewash. . . . New York Mets 1B Rick Herrscher (SMU's leading scorer in 1957-58 as All-SWC first-team selection) hammered his lone MLB homer (three-run blast against the Cincinnati Reds in the opener of a 1962 doubleheader). . . . Chicago White Sox 1B Gail Hopkins (averaged 2.5 ppg with Pepperdine in 1963-64) supplied four hits against the Washington Senators in 1969. . . . CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) scored the winning run in the 11th inning in 2001 when the Cleveland Indians erased a 14-2 deficit in the seventh to prevail, 15-14, against the Seattle Mariners. . . . Chicago Cubs RF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference Tournament MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) whacked two homers against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1980. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87 under coach Dale Brown) hurled a one-hit shutout against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1994. . . . OF Richie Scheinblum (averaged 6.1 ppg and 3.6 rpg in 1962-63 and 1963-64 with LIU-C.W. Post) purchased from the Kansas City Royals by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1974. . . . P Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) awarded on waivers from the New York Yankees to the Washington Nationals in 2014. . . . Philadelphia Phillies OF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10), who went on to lead the N.L. in homers in 1927, hit for the cycle in a 9-7 triumph against the Pittsburgh Pirates.
6 - In 1932, 1B Dale Alexander (starting center for Milligan, TN, in mid-1920s) provided a single for the Boston Red Sox' lone safety off Wes Ferrell of the Cleveland Indians. . . . Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) fired as Detroit Tigers manager in 1938. . . . Cincinnati Reds rookie CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) hit a grand slam in an 11-6 triumph against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1938. . . . San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 4-for-5 in a 12-10 win against the Montreal Expos in 1999, posting the 3,000th hit of his MLB career. . . . P Mark Hendrickson (two time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection paced Washington State in rebounding four straight seasons from 1992-93 through 1995-96) made his MLB debut with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2002. . . . INF Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Chicago Cubs in 1978. . . . San Francisco Giants 1B-OF Rick Leach (averaged 15.5 ppg for Michigan's junior varsity team in 1975-76) suspended for 60 days in 1990 following a positive drug test. . . . Cleveland Indians RF Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) raised his batting average to .372 with back-to-back three-hit games. . . . Washington Senators INF Buddy Myer (Mississippi State letterman in 1923-24) contributed four hits in a 13-11 victory against the New York Yankees in the opener of a 1929 doubleheader. . . . 1B Jack Phillips (leading scorer for 14-1 Clarkson, NY, in 1942-43) purchased from the New York Yankees by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1949.
7 - Detroit Tigers rookie 1B Dale Alexander (starting center in mid-1920s for Milligan TN) amassed three extra-base hits and six RBI in a 14-4 win against the Cleveland Indians in 1929. . . . Brooklyn Robins LF Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive contests in 1930 and 1931) went 4-for-4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the nightcap of a 1938 doubleheader. . . . Washington Senators rookie P Bucky Jacobs (member of undefeated team in 1935 was among Richmond's top two scorers each of next two seasons) earned his lone MLB victory (against the Detroit Tigers in the nightcap of a 1937 twinbill). . . . 2B Dutch Meyer (letterman for TCU in 1934-35 and 1935-36) traded by the New York Giants to the Detroit Tigers in 1940. . . . P Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty, WV, from 1963-64 through 1965-66) awarded off waivers from the Detroit Tigers to the Atlanta Braves in 1973. . . . OF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) shipped by the Detroit Tigers to the Montreal Expos as part of a conditional deal in 1974. . . . In 1987, Detroit Tigers P Jeff Robinson (two-time NAIA All-District 3 honoree in early 1980s left Azusa Pacific, CA, as its No. 9 all-time scorer) blanked the New York Yankees, 8-0, retiring the last 24 batters in a row. . . . Boston Red Sox rookie P Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection led Oklahoma won seventh straight start, improving his record to 13-2 in 1961. . . . Cleveland Indians 2B Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) went 4-for-4 against the New York Yankees in 1924. . . . In 1990, California Angels OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) collected his 2,500th career hit.
8 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) launched two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1956 twinbill. . . . Detroit Tigers rookie 1B Dale Alexander (starting center in mid-1920s for Milligan TN) went 5-for-5 in a 9-6 win against the Cleveland Indians in 1929. Two years later, Alexander contributed four hits in a 7-1 triumph against the Indians. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Joey Amalfitano (played for Loyola Marymount in 1952-53) contributed a career-high four hits in a 14-10 triumph against the New York Mets in 1965. . . . Chicago Cubs CF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) had career-high 16-game hitting streak snapped by his original team (the Cincinnati Reds) in the nightcap of a 1951 doubleheader. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) collected seven hits against the San Francisco Giants in a 1971 twinbill split. . . . Kansas City Royals P Rich Gale (led New Hampshire with 7.2 rpg in 1975-76) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Toronto Blue Jays in 1980. . . . Kansas City Royals 1B Gail Hopkins (averaged 2.5 ppg with Pepperdine in 1963-64) went 4-for-4 against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1971. . . . SS Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) stroked a two-out single in the ninth inning to give the New York Yankees a 3-2 victory against the Texas Rangers in 1973. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s) pounded an 11th-inning homer to propel the Chicago Cubs to a 2-1 triumph against the Cincinnati Reds in 1947. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) won his eighth straight decision and fourth game in 10 days in 1956. . . . Baltimore Orioles LF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) socked two homers in each of back-to-back games against the Texas Rangers in 1987. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) notched his fourth save in as many relief appearances during a 12-game scoreless stretch in 1980.
9 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) hit two homers in an 8-3 setback against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1961. . . . New York Mets P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman basketball team) ended his N.L. record-tying 18-game losing streak by beating the Chicago Cubs, 7-3. Craig will be on the losing end of a shutout nine times in 1963. . . . New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) extended his hitting streak to 17 games in 1951. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) generated four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1932. . . . Cincinnati Reds 1B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) had four hits in a 9-8 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1932. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) set new MLB record by stealing his 32nd consecutive base without being caught in 1975. . . . Cleveland Indians 2B Dutch Meyer (TCU letterman in 1934-35 and 1935-36) contributed four hits in a 3-2 loss against the New York Yankees in 1945. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s) traded by the Philadelphia Athletics to the Washington Senators in 1938. . . . Boston Braves rookie C Ebba St. Claire (Colgate letterman in 1941-42) tied a N.L. backstop standard by participating in three double plays in a single game in 1951. . . . Atlanta Braves P George Stone (averaged 14.7 ppg and 6.5 rpg for Louisiana Tech in 1964-65 and 1965-66) hurled a six-hit shutout against the Houston Astros in 1972. . . . Detroit Tigers 2B Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) had his sixth straight multiple-hit outing in the midst of a career-high 15-game hitting streak.
10 - Philadelphia Phillies LF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) delivered three doubles en route to a N.L.-high 42 in a 5-3 loss against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1934. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon basketball letterman in 1915) posted his second five-hit game in less than two months in 1922. . . . 1B-OF Dick Gernert (letterman with Temple in 1948-49 when he averaged 2.7 ppg) homered in the 10th inning to help catapult the Boston Red Sox to a 3-1 victory against the New York Yankees in 1952. . . . Baltimore Orioles 3B Ryan Minor (two-time All-Big Eight Conference first-team selection for Oklahoma was league player of year as junior in 1994-95 when averaging 23.6 ppg and 8.4 rpg) had a career-high three hits against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays in 1999. . . . In 1936, INF Buddy Myer (Mississippi State letterman in 1923-24), the defending A.L. batting champion, sent home by the Washington Senators to recover from a season-long stomach ailment. . . . C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) purchased from the Cleveland Indians by the Washington Senators in 1963. . . . In the midst of five complete-game victories in less than a month in 1933, New York Giants P Roy Parmelee (Eastern Michigan letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) tossed a two-hit shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . San Diego Padres RF Clint Venable (two-time All-Ivy League selection averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) contributed three extra-base hits in a 9-5 win against the New York Mets in 2011. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates CF Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) tied a MLB mark by notching two assists in the seventh inning of the nightcap of a 1958 doubleheader against the Cincinnati Reds. Twenty-four years later in 1982, Virdon was fired as manager of the Houston Astros.
11 - In the midst of a career-high 20-game hitting streak in 1959, Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) went 4-for-4 against the Cincinnati Reds, homering in his third straight outing. . . . Detroit Tigers P Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first-five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) hurled his second shutout in a 10-day span in 1934. . . . New York Giants P Curt Barclay (Oregon's third-leading scorer and rebounder as a sophomore in 1950-51) hurled a three-hit, 5-0 shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1957 doubleheader. It was Barclay's second straight whitewash. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) furnished his third consecutive contest with three safeties in 1952. . . . Texas Rangers P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) fired his second shutout against the Detroit Tigers during the 1974 campaign. . . . In 1990, Atlanta Braves P Marty Clary (Northwestern letterman in 1981-82 and 1982-83) incurred his seventh defeat in as many decisions in a five-week span. . . . C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) delivered a decisive ninth-inning hit to give the win to P George Earnshaw (Swarthmore, PA, player in 1922) in the Philadelphia Athletics' 3-2 decision over the Washington Senators in 1928. . . . Gene Desautels (Holy Cross letterman in 1929 and 1930) caught the entire game for the Cleveland Indians without a putout (no strikeouts) in 1942 when they have a 14-inning scoreless tie with the Detroit Tigers. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s) capped off back-to-back-to-back homers by the Chicago Cubs but the three straight round-trippers weren't enough to prevent a 7-5 defeat against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1941. . . . In 1945, Chicago Cubs P Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps, MS, in late 1920s and early 1930s) restricted the Boston Braves to two hits - both coming with two outs in the eighth inning. . . . In 1987, Baltimore Orioles LF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) smacked two homers for the third time in his last five games. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Rob Sperring (averaged 8.7 ppg and 2.9 rpg for Pacific from 1968-69 through 1970-71) collected a homer and double in his MLB debut against the San Francisco Giants in 1974. . . . 2B Johnny Temple (played briefly for Catawba, NC, in 1945 before serving in U.S. Navy) purchased from the Baltimore Orioles by the Houston Colt .45s in 1962. . . . In 1959, Detroit Tigers SS Coot Veal (Auburn's scoring leader as sophomore in 1951-52) connected for his lone MLB homer (against the Chicago White Sox). . . . P Jim Wilson (letterman for San Diego State's 1942 NAIA Tournament participant) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Detroit Tigers in 1949.
12 - California Angels P Chris Beasley (Arizona State's leading scorer in 1983-84) lost his only MLB decision in 1991 (4-3 against the Minnesota Twins). . . . Chicago Cubs rookie P Paul Reuschel (averaged 12.1 rpg for Western Illinois in 1966-67 and 1967-68) surrendered his only run in a 13-game relief span through the end of the month in 1975. . . . In 1953, Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) beat the Pittsburgh Pirates for the 15th consecutive time. Roberts reached the 20-win plateau for the fourth straight season. . . . Baltimore Orioles OF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection for Eastern Mennonite VA in 1981-82 and 1982-83) and teammate Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) socked back-to-back pinch-hit homers but they weren't enough to prevent an 8-5 setback against the Cleveland Indians in 1985. . . . In 1960, Detroit Tigers P Dave Sisler (All-Ivy League second-team selection for Princeton's first NCAA playoff team in 1952) supplied his eighth straight relief appearance without yielding an earned run. . . . Arizona Diamondbacks rookie 2B Junior Spivey (redshirted his only semester at Northwestern Oklahoma State on a basketball scholarship before transferring to a KS junior college) registered his second five-hit game of the 2001 campaign. . . . Chicago Cubs INF-OF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) knocked in the winning run in the 11th inning of a 3-2 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1930. . . . San Francisco Giants OF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) accounted for the game's only run with a homer at Florida in 2005.
13 - Toronto Blue Jays CF Danny Ainge (three-time Brigham Young All-American and national player of year as senior in 1980-81) went 3-for-3 in a 5-4 setback against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1980. . . . Chicago Cubs rookie RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) collected five hits, including two homers, and five RBI in a 20-9 win against the San Francisco Giants in 1959. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) won his sixth decision in a row en route to leading the N.L. in winning percentage in 1979. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) cracked a pinch-hit grand slam against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1959. . . . Chicago White Sox P Dave DeBusschere (three-time All-American for Detroit from 1959-60 through 1961-62) tossed a shutout against the Cleveland Indians in 1963. . . . In 1955, Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) made his first miscue after an A.L.-record 165 errorless games. . . . Boston Red Sox P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) won his eighth straight game for victory No. 20 in 1946. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) hurled a one-hitter to beat the Chicago Cubs, 1-0, in 1966. . . . New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) shut out the Philadelphia Phillies' Whiz Kids in 1950. . . . Baltimore Orioles rookie P Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87 under coach Dale Brown) won his first five MLB starts in 1990. . . . Chicago White Sox P Jimmy Miles (averaged 5.2 ppg and 8.9 rpg for Delta State MS in 1964-65) lost his lone MLB decision (7-3 against the Kansas City Royals in 1969). . . . C Don Prohovich (member of Holy Cross' 1954 NIT champion) traded with $15,000 by the White Sox to the Cubs for utilityman Earl Averill Jr. in 1960. Deal was the first swap of players between the two Chicago franchises. . . . OF Rip Repulski (started a few games for St. Cloud State, MN) hit a three-run pinch homer for the Philadelphia Phillies but they still lost against the Pittsburgh Pirates, 10-9, in 1958. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1911-12 and 1913-14) drove in two runs and blanked the Pittsburgh Pirates, 3-0, in 1932. . . . Milwaukee Braves 2B Mel Roach (averaged 9.3 ppg for Virginia in 1952-53) went 3-for-3, including a homer, and chipped in with three RBI in a 4-2 win against the San Francisco Giants in 1960.
14 - Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) suffered a broken right ankle in a collision at second base in 1945. . . . P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) won his first and only decision with the New York Yankees (3-1 over the Boston Red Sox in 1954). . . . Cincinnati Reds CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) contributed three extra-base hits (double, triple and homer) against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1938 twinbill. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) hurled a no-hitter at Pittsburgh in 1971. . . . Texas Rangers 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State basketball letterman) supplied a leadoff homer for the second straight game in 1977. . . . Philadelphia Phillies 3B Chuck Harmon (second-leading scorer for Toledo in 1946-47 and 1947-48) went 4-for-4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1957. . . . P Dave Madison (letterman for LSU from 1939-40 through 1942-43) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Detroit Tigers in an eight-player swap in 1952. . . . In 1991, St. Louis Cardinals reliever Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) reached the 30-save plateau for the sixth time en route to leading the N.L. with 47. . . . New York Mets P Darrell Sutherland (averaged 8.1 ppg and 2.2 rpg for Stanford from 1960-61 through 1962-63 under coach Howie Dallmar) tripled and hurled four innings of hitless relief in posting his first MLB victory (1-0 in 10 frames against the Houston Astros in 1965). . . . Birdie Tebbetts (played for Providence in 1932) resigned as manager of the Cincinnati Reds in 1958. . . . Detroit Tigers rookie SS Coot Veal (Auburn's scoring leader as sophomore in 1951-52) contributed three safeties against the Cleveland Indians, triggering a 13-game hitting streak in 1958. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s) hit for the cycle in the opener of a 1960 doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . In 1991, California Angels RF-DH Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) slugged the 400th homer of his career.
15 - California Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) socked two homers against the Minnesota Twins in 1966. . . . Philadelphia Phillies CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) provided four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1935. . . . California Angels 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1970 averaged 7.4 ppg and 4 rpg) contributed three extra-base hits in an 8-0 win against the Detroit Tigers in 1975. . . . 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg in 1950-51 for Spring Hill AL) knocked in all of the Detroit Tigers' runs in a 12-5 setback against the Kansas City Athletics in 1958. . . . Milwaukee Braves P Gene Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as a Washington State sophomore) won his ninth consecutive contest in 1954 (2-1 against the Chicago Cubs). Seven years later, Conley was with the Boston Red Sox in 1961 when he tossed a shutout and hit a homer in an 8-0 shelling of the Cleveland Indians. . . . 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) was hospitalized after beaning in 1950 but the Boston Red Sox began a streak of winning 27 of their next 30 games. . . . Boston Red Sox 1B Tony Lupien (Harvard captain in 1938-39 accumulated four hits against the St. Louis Browns for the third time in 1943. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) blanked opponents going into extra innings but wound up losing each contest - against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1910 and Boston Braves in 1914. . . . OF Greasy Neale (West Virginia Wesleyan College hoopster graduated in 1915) pilfered second, third and home in the ninth inning to help the Cincinnati Reds upend the New York Giants, 4-0, in 1919. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in the mid-1930s) socked three homers, two doubles and a single but the Chicago Cubs dropped both ends of a 1942 doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . Houston Astros 2B Rob Sperring (averaged 8.7 ppg and 2.9 rpg for Pacific from 1968-69 through 1970-71) supplied a career-high four hits in a 15-3 rout of the Atlanta Braves in 1977. . . . New York Giants C Wes Westrum (played for Bemidji State, MN, one season before serving in military during WWII) provided the difference with an eighth-inning, two-run homer in a 3-1 decision over the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1951. . . . OF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94), playing his first home game with the San Francisco Giants, hit for the cycle against the Cincinnati Reds in 2005.
16 - Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) contributed four hits against the San Francisco Giants in 1972. . . . Chicago Cubs P Tom Dettore (averaged team-high 14.1 ppg plus 9 rpg in 1965-66 for Juniata PA) earned his first MLB victory with 6 1/3 innings of shutout relief against the San Diego Padres in 1974. . . . Chicago White Sox 1B Kerby Farrell (key player for couple of strong Freed-Hardeman TN squads in mid-1930s) collected three hits for the second consecutive contest in 1945. . . . Kansas City Royals CF Lynn Jones (averaged 10.4 ppg for Thiel PA from 1970-71 through 1973-74) had four hits against the Toronto Blue Jays in 1985. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) improved his record to 19-5 with a 3-0 shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals but will miss the remainder of the 1964 season because of an elbow injury incurred while sliding back into second base earlier in the month. . . . In 1911, New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) defeated the Cincinnati Reds for the 22nd straight time. . . . Detroit Tigers LF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice while averaging 5.6 ppg and 3.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90) hit safely in first 10 games of the month, a career high, before he was blanked by the Cleveland Indians in 1996.
17 - San Diego Padres P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) surrendered his only earned run (against the Chicago Cubs) in last 34 relief appearances in 2009. . . . 1B Ron Allen (Youngstown State's scoring and rebounding leader as a sophomore in 1961-62) secured his only MLB hit, a ninth-inning homer at San Diego in 1972, after the brother of standout 1B Dick Allen replaced ejected St. Louis Cardinals teammate Joe Torre. . . . San Diego Padres SS Bill Almon (averaged 2.5 ppg in half a season for Brown's 1972-73 team ending school streak of 12 straight losing records) collected three hits and five RBI in a 7-4 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1977. . . . OF Billy Cowan (Utah letterman from 1957-58 through 1959-60 was co-captain of NCAA playoff team as senior) clubbed a two-run, pinch homer off Juan Pizzaro in the eighth inning to give the California Angels a 7-6 victory against the Cleveland Indians in 1969. . . . Bing Devine (Washington, MO, letterman in mid-1930s) fired as general manager of the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964 before they go on to win the World Series against the New York Yankees. . . . OF Curt Flood and 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV), the first two St. Louis Cardinals batters, hammer back-to-back home runs off Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) in the opener of a 1958 doubleheader. . . . Philadelphia Athletics RF Walt French (letterman for Rutgers and Army) went 4-for-4 against the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a 1926 twinbill. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Dick Hall (averaged 11.9 ppg in 1948-49, 13.4 in 1949-50 and 15.4 in 1950-51 for Swarthmore's Southern Division champions in Middle Atlantic States Conference) provided a perfect inning of relief against the Kansas City Athletics in 1963, giving him 28 consecutive batters retired in a span of five appearances. . . . In 2008, Florida Marlins P Mark Hendrickson (two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection was Washington State's leading rebounder each season from 1992-93 through 1995-96) allowed his only run in nine relief appearances during the month. . . . In 1985, Reggie Jackson of the New York Yankees, moving past Willie McCovey and Ted Williams on the all-time homer list, swatted his 522nd career round-tripper off Oakland A's P Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage in 1975-76 with Portland). . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) hurled his second straight three-hit shutout against Chicago in 1905. . . . New York Giants P Jim Mooney (played for East Tennessee State) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Cincinnati Reds in 1932. . . . Cincinnati Reds rookie RF Greasy Neale (graduated in 1915 from West Virginia Wesleyan) had his 12-game hitting streak snapped by the Chicago Cubs in 1920. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) stole three bases against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1978. . . . Boston Braves rookie C Ebba St. Claire (Colgate letterman in 1941-42) had an 11-game hitting streak snapped by the Brooklyn Dodgers' Carl Erskine in the opener of a 1951 doubleheader.
18 - In the midst of a 21-game hitting streak, St. Louis Browns RF Beau Bell (two-year letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) went 5-for-5 in the opener of a 1936 doubleheader against the Detroit Tigers. . . . P Ray Burris (played for Southwestern Oklahoma State) purchased from the New York Yankees by the New York Mets in 1979. . . . INF Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of his last three seasons with Lebanon Valley, PA, in late 1920s) awarded on waivers from the Washington Senators to the Boston Red Sox in 1940. . . . Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) fired as manager of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1989. . . . Chicago White Sox P Harry Kinzy (starting forward for TCU from 1931-32 through 1933-34) lost his lone MLB decision and complete game when walking 10 Washington Senators batters in 1934. . . . New York Giants CF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) collected a homer, triple and two doubles in an 8-4 triumph against the Cincinnati Reds in 1935. . . . Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) doubled in his fifth consecutive contest in 1956. . . . Cleveland Indians 2B Dutch Meyer (TCU letterman in 1934-35 and 1935-36) went 4-for-4 in a 7-4 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1945. . . . Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) stroked four hits in a 6-3 win against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1973. . . . P Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps, MS, in late 1920s and early 1930s) tossed a three-hit shutout as the Philadelphia Phillies ended a 14-game losing streak with a 7-0 verdict over the Boston Bees in 1936. . . . P Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Chicago White Sox in 1977.
19 - Chicago Cubs 1B George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) had four hits in a 4-3 win against the Houston Colt .45s in 1962. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates LF Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) went 4-for-4 and chipped in with five RBI against the Brooklyn Robins in 1925. . . . 2B Marv Breeding (played for Samford in mid-1950s) purchased from the Los Angeles Dodgers by the Baltimore Orioles in 1964. . . . Detroit Tigers rookie P Ownie Carroll (Holy Cross letterman in 1922) hurled his third complete-game victory of the month in 1927. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Andy Karl (Manhattan letterman from 1933 through 1935) saved slugger Jimmie Foxx's only MLB pitching decision in 1945 (6-2 win over the Cincinnati Reds). . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) had his 22-game winning streak against the Cincinnati Reds snapped in 1911. . . . Detroit Tigers LF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice while averaging 5.6 ppg and 3.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90) smacked a pinch-hit, three-run homer against the Chicago White Sox in 1996. . . . OF Gary Redus (J.C. player for Athens, AL, and father of Centenary/South Alabama performer) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1988. . . . 1B-OF Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State's back-to-back NAIA Tournament titlists in 1952 and 1953) supplied a pinch-hit, bases-loaded triple to help the Boston Red Sox outlasted the California Angels, 12-11, in 1967. . . . Philadelphia Phillies rookie SS Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) went 3-for-3, including his first MLB homer, against the Chicago Cubs in 1967. . . . San Diego Padres CF Clint Venable (two-time All-Ivy League selection averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) went hitless for the only time in his first 25 games of the month in 2013. . . . Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) hired as manager by the Houston Astros in 1975.
20 - Houston Astros C Mark Bailey (led Southwest Missouri State in rebounding and field-goal percentage in 1980-81) collected three hits, four runs and four RBI in a 17-2 romp over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1985. . . . Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg in 1950-51 for Spring Hill AL) collected two homers and five RBI against the New York Yankees in 1959. . . . Kansas City Athletics OF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) swatted three homers in an 11-10 defeat against the Boston Red Sox in 1959. . . . P Bill Connors (averaged 6 ppg and 2.3 rpg for Syracuse in 1960-61) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the New York Mets in 1967. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers SS Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" basketball championship squad for Washington College MD) contributed four hits against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1933 doubleheader. . . . Chicago White Sox P Bob Keegan (Bucknell letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43), utilizing a new slow delivery, hurled a 6-0 no-hitter against the Washington Senators in 1957. . . . SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago White Sox in 1977. . . . 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 as a sophomore in 1965-66) set a Los Angeles Dodgers record with 15 total bases in an 18-8 romp over the Chicago Cubs in 1974 (three homers, double and single). . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) had his 15-game winning streak against the Pittsburgh Pirates snapped in 1953. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers SS Tommy Brown (17 years old) became the youngest player to hit a MLB homer in 1945 when he connected off Pittsburgh Pirates P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s). . . . St. Louis Cardinals P John Stuper (two-time all-conference junior college player in mid-1970s with Butler County PA) hurled his lone MLB shutout (five-hitter against the Houston Astros in 1983). . . . Birdie Tebbetts (played for Providence in 1932) resigned as manager of the Cleveland Indians in 1966. . . . New York Yankees OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) walloped the 300th homer of his career in 1986.
21 - Boston Red Sox INF Jack Barry (letterman for Holy Cross in 1908) tied a MLB record with four sacrifices at Cleveland in 1916. . . . Philadelphia Athletics P Bill Beckmann (played in late 1920s for Washington MO) tossed a shutout against the Chicago White Sox in 1940 for his fifth victory in as many decisions in a 3 1/2-week span. . . . Philadelphia Phillies rookie P Ron Diorio (New Haven CT runner-up in scoring and rebounding in 1968-69) yielded the only run in his first 17 relief appearances in the 1973 campaign (0.60 ERA in that span). . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) twirled a shutout and knocked in six runs with a pair of bases-loaded doubles in an 11-0 rout of the Cincinnati Reds in 1966. . . . Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln, PA, 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) named special assistant to Commissioner William Eckert in 1968. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) hurled a no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox in 1926. Lyons required only 67 minutes and 81 pitches. . . . Philadelphia Athletics P Bill McCahan (three-year Duke letterman named to All-Southern Conference Tournament team in 1942) earned his fourth consecutive complete-game victory in 1947. . . . 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) accounted for both of the New York Yankees' runs via a homer and double in a 2-1 triumph against the Texas Rangers in 1977. . . . P Floyd Newkirk (Hall of Fame selection at Illinois College) made his lone MLB appearance with the New York Yankees in 1934. . . . Pitchers Paul Reuschel (Western Illinois' leading rebounder in 1966-67 with 15.2 per game) and Rick Reuschel collaborated on a 7-0 victory for the Chicago Cubs against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1975 - the first time brothers combined on a shutout. Paul relieved in the seventh inning after Rick was forced to leave because of a blister on his finger. . . . San Diego Padres RF Clint Venable (two-time All-Ivy League selection averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) had four hits in a 7-5 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2012.
22 - Detroit Tigers 1B Dale Alexander (starting center in mid-1920s for Milligan TN) delivered four hits in a 9-6 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1931. . . . San Diego Padres SS Bill Almon (averaged 2.5 ppg in half a season for Brown's 1972-73 team ending school streak of 12 straight losing records) went 4-for-4 against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1979. . . . St. Louis Browns rookie RF Red Badgro (first-five pick on All-Pacific Coast Conference team in 1926-27 as USC's MVP) banged out four hits in a 10-0 victory against the New York Yankees in 1929. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915), playing in his third straight extra-inning game against Brooklyn, went 6-for-11 in a 22-inning marathon in 1917. . . . P Jim Konstanty (Syracuse player in late 1930s) awarded on waivers from the Philadelphia Phillies to the New York Yankees in 1954. . . . In 1973, OF Joe Lahoud (New Haven CT letterman in mid-1960s) launched a ninth-inning, pinch-hit grand slam to give the Milwaukee Brewers a 4-3 lead but they wound up losing against the California Angels, 5-4, in 10 innings. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s) socked a game-winning homer in the bottom of the 11th inning in a 5-4 decision over the Cincinnati Reds in 1942. . . . St. Louis Cardinals C Don Padgett (freshman in 1934 with Lenoir-Rhyne NC excelled in multiple sports) provided four hits against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1939. . . . INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) contributed five hits in the nightcap of a 1951 doubleheader to spark the Brooklyn Dodgers to their 14th straight victory against the St. Louis Cardinals.
23 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) provided four hits against the Chicago Cubs in the opener of a 1953 twinbill. . . . In 1989, Atlanta Braves P Marty Clary (Northwestern letterman in 1981-82 and 1982-83) notched his lone MLB shutout (3-0 against the St. Louis Cardinals). . . . 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) purchased from the Pittsburgh Pirates by the Chicago White Sox in 1965. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) knocked in the winning run in the 11th inning of the nightcap of a 1959 doubleheader against the Los Angeles Dodgers to give reliever Elroy Face his 16th victory without a loss. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) hammered his 14th career grand slam to set a new N.L. record. It was the first grand slam in the history of the franchise on the West Coast. . . . New York Yankees rookie RF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when averaging 12.4 ppg) went 4-for-4 with three RBI in a 7-5 win against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1970 twinbill. . . . Utilityman Jimmy Stewart (All-Volunteer State Athletic Conference selection for Austin Peay State in 1959-60 and 1960-61) slugged a three-run, pinch-hit homer off Hall of Famer Tom Seaver to spark the Cincinnati Reds to a 7-5 triumph against the New York Mets in 1970. . . . Chicago Cubs rookie OF Champ Summers (led SIUE in scoring in 1969-70 after doing same with Nicholls State in 1964-65) smacked his first MLB homer, a pinch-hit grand slam, against the Houston Astros in 1975. . . . P Tom Zachary (Guilford, NC, letterman in 1916) awarded on waivers from the Washington Senators to the New York Yankees in 1928.
24 - Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) hurled a three-hit shutout against the Chicago Cubs in 1951, striking out 10 and walking none. . . . Cincinnati Reds CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) contributed two homers, a double and six RBI in a 13-9 win against the New York Giants in 1941. . . . Cleveland Indians P Johnson Fry (Marshall letterman in 1921-22) made his lone MLB appearance in 1923. . . . San Francisco Giants P Ed Halicki (set Monmouth's single-game rebounding record with 40 as a junior in 1970-71 before leading Hawks in scoring with 21 ppg as a senior) hurled a no-hitter against the New York Mets in 1975. . . . P Bobby Humphreys (four-year letterman graduated Hampden-Sydney VA in 1958) won his third game in relief in six days for the Washington Senators in 1966. . . . SS Doc Lavan (played for Hope, MI, from 1908 through 1910) purchased from the St. Louis Browns by the Philadelphia Athletics in 1919. . . . New York Giants OF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) tied a MLB single-inning record by lashing two homers during an eight-run uprising in the second frame against the Chicago Cubs in 1935. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 as a sophomore in 1965-66) stole five bases in a 3-0 triumph against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1974. The next year, Lopes extended his MLB record streak to 38 consecutive successful steal attempts before he was thrown out by Montreal Expos C Gary Carter in the 12th inning. . . . Cleveland Indians 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) collected five RBI in an 11-7 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1931. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) had a streak of 13 consecutive complete games against the Milwaukee Braves snapped in 1954. . . . In 1952, Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) registered his 10th straight victory against the St. Louis Cardinals, 10-4. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Rob Sperring (averaged 8.7 ppg and 2.9 rpg for Pacific from 1968-69 through 1970-71) had his career-high 11-game hitting streak snapped by the Houston Astros in 1976. . . . Atlanta Braves P George Stone (averaged 14.7 ppg and 6.5 rpg for Louisiana Tech in 1964-65 and 1965-66) tossed a three-hit shutout against the Montreal Expos in 1970.
25 - New York Yankees Hall of Fame OF Earle Combs (three-year captain for Eastern Kentucky) incurred a severe shoulder injury colliding with a teammate in the outfield, contributing to Combs retiring following the 1935 campaign. . . . Boston Red Sox P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) topped the visiting Cleveland Indians, 2-1, to improve his 1946 Fenway Park mark to 13-0. . . . Philadelphia Athletics starting P Stu Flythe (North Carolina State letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) walked 11 Chicago White Sox batters in three innings in 1936. . . . In 1982, San Diego Padres rookie OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) broke his wrist diving for a fly ball en route to falling short of a .300 batting average for the only time in his 20-year career (.289). . . . OF David Justice (led Thomas More, KY, in assists in 1984-85) and Atlanta Braves teammate Fred McGriff whacked back-to-back homers for the second time in 10 days in 1993. . . . Washington Senators SS Doc Lavan (played for Hope MI from 1908 through 1910) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1918 twinbill. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) reached the 20-win plateau for the seventh straight season in 1909. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates OF Gary Redus (J.C. player for Athens, AL, and father of Centenary/South Alabama hoopster) hit for the cycle against the Cincinnati Reds in 1989. . . . New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (played briefly with Dartmouth in 1927-28 and 1929-30) extended his streak of scoring at least one run to 18 straight contests in 1939. . . . Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) went 7-for-10 in a 1933 doubleheader split against the Philadelphia Phillies.
26 - St. Louis Browns RF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) went 4-for-4 against the New York Yankees in 1937. . . . 1B Kevin "Chuck" Connors (scored 32 points in 15 varsity games for Seton Hall in 1941-42 before leaving school for military service) clubbed a game-tying three-run homer for the Chicago Cubs at the Polo Grounds against the New York Giants before Giants C Wes Westrum (played for Bemidji State, MN, one season before serving in military during WWII) whacked a game-winning, ninth-inning homer in the opener of a 1951 doubleheader. . . . Boston Red Sox P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) posted his 20th victory by doubling home the game-winning run in a 4-3 verdict over the Philadelphia Athletics in the opener of a 1945 doubleheader. . . . Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) fired as manager of the New York Mets in 1996. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) tossed his seventh shutout of the 1902 campaign. Twelve years later, Mathewson hurled a two-hit shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in the nightcap of a twinbill to register his 20th triumph in 1914. . . . In 1977, 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) stroked a two-run triple in the ninth inning to lift the New York Yankees to their 12th win in 13 contests (6-5 against the Texas Rangers). . . . St. Louis Cardinals LF Don Padgett (freshman in 1934 with Lenoir-Rhyne NC excelled in multiple sports) had three hits against the Brooklyn Dodgers in both ends of a 1941 doubleheader split. . . . P Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg in three seasons from 1977-78 through 1979-80) traded by the New York Yankees to the Cincinnati Reds in 1987. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47), released earlier in the year by the Yankees, outdueled New York star lefthander Whitey Ford, 2-1, in 1962. . . . In 1939, Cincinnati Reds 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) became the initial player to bat in a televised major league game (against the Brooklyn Dodgers).
27 - In 1964, California Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) became the 23rd player to reach the 300-homer plateau when he connected at Kansas City. . . . Philadelphia Athletics P Stan Baumgartner (played on Big Ten Conference champion for University of Chicago in 1914) posted his third straight complete-game victory closing out the month in 1924. . . . Starting on two days rest, Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) spun a two-hit shutout against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1951, entering the ninth inning with a no-hitter. . . . Chicago Cubs 1B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) went 4-for-4 in a 2-0 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1933. . . . In his second MLB start, Brooklyn Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) fanned 14 Cincinnati Reds in a 7-0 two-hit shutout in 1955. . . . Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) resigned as Cincinnati Reds manager in 1918 to accept a commission as a captain in the chemical warfare branch of the Army during World War I. . . . St. Louis Browns rookie P Jack Ogden (played for Swarthmore PA in 1918), posting his third straight complete-game victory, hurled a four-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox in the nightcap of a 1928 twinbill. . . . Chicago White Sox P Gary Peters (played for Grove City, PA, in mid-1950s) hurled an 11-inning shutout against the Boston Red Sox in the nightcap of a 1967 doubleheader. . . . St. Louis Browns P Bob Poser (Wisconsin letterman from 1929-30 through 1931-32) posted his lone MLB victory (against the Washington Senators in the opener of a 1935 twinbill). . . . Detroit Tigers rookie 3B Nolen Richardson (Georgia captain in 1925-26) went 3-for-3 in a 9-4 win against the Chicago White Sox in 1931. . . . Pinch-hitter Jimmy Stewart (All-Volunteer State Athletic Conference selection for Austin Peay State in 1959-60 and 1960-61) stroked a bases-loaded triple to spur the Cincinnati Reds to an 8-7 victory against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1971.
28 - New York Yankees 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) slugged three homers in an 18-6 trouncing of the Toronto Blue Jays in 2004. . . . In 1927, Philadelphia Athletics RF Walt French (letterman for Rutgers and Army) had his fourth three-hit game in an eight-day span. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) provided four hits, including a two-run safety in the ninth inning, in a 3-2 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1941. . . . Boston Braves 1B Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive contests in 1930 and 1931) had four hits in a 10-5 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1939. . . . Cleveland Indians P Dutch Levsen (Iowa State letterman in 1918-19) became the last MLB hurler to register a complete-game win in both ends of a doubleheader with a pair of four-hitters against the Boston Red Sox in 1926. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) went 6-for-6 against the Oakland A's in 1969. Northrup's 13th-inning homer over the roof won the game, 5-3. . . . Washington Senators P Denny Riddleberger (averaged 5.7 ppg and 2.5 rpg for Old Dominion in 1965-66) yielded his only earned run in a 15-game span of relief appearances during the 1971 campaign. . . . P Jeff Shaw (freshman guard for Rio Grande, OH, squad compiling a 31-5 record and reaching second round of 1985 NAIA Tournament) traded by the Montreal Expos to the Chicago White Sox in 1995.
29 - In 1959, Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) homered in his third consecutive contest for the second time this month. . . . Cincinnati Reds rookie CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) had four hits and scored three runs in a 6-5 win against the Boston Braves in the nightcap of a 1927 doubleheader. . . . St. Louis Browns P Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first-five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) notched his fourth consecutive complete-game triumph the last half of the month in 1941. . . . Detroit Tigers CF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) contributed four hits against the New York Yankees in the nightcap of a 1948 twinbill. . . . In 1951, New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates for the eighth straight time. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) drove in seven runs and whacked two homers in a 13-1 victory against the Cincinnati Reds in 1951. . . . New York Mets P Cal Koonce (Campbell standout in 1960 and 1961 when North Carolina-based school was a junior college) hurled a five-hit shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1967. . . . St. Louis Browns RF Don Lund (Michigan starter in 1943-44 and 1944-45) had five RBI in a 12-4 win against the Boston Red Sox in the nightcap of a 1948 doubleheader. . . . Boston Red Sox 3B Pinky Pittenger (set Toledo's single-game scoring standard with 49 points in 1918-19) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1922. . . . In 1966, Chicago Cubs P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) registered the final triumph of his 19-year Hall of Fame career. . . . INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) hit for the cycle against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1948 twinbill. . . . New York Yankees P Marius Russo (member of LIU teams compiling 50-2 record in 1934-35 and 1935-36 under legendary coach Clair Bee) registered his fifth complete-game victory of the month in 1940. . . . Chicago Cubs rookie 2B Jimmy Stewart (two-time All-VSAC selection was Austin Peay's third-leading scorer in 1959-60 and 1960-61 when participating in NCAA DII Tournament) supplied back-to-back games with three hits against the New York Mets in 1964. . . . San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as a junior and second-team choice as a senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) tripled in his first MLB at-bat in 2008. . . . Detroit Tigers P Ed Wells (multi-sport athlete graduated in 1924 from Bethany WV) won his fifth straight decision of the month in 1925.
30 - Texas Rangers RF Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding in 1966-67 for Buena Vista IA) banged out four hits against the Minnesota Twins in 1973. . . . Philadelphia Athletics SS John Chapman (played multiple seasons for Mount St. Mary's) chipped in with a career-high three hits against the Boston Red Sox in the opener of a 1924 doubleheader. . . . Tim Cullen (starting guard for Santa Clara in 1962-63 when he averaged 10 ppg) tied a MLB single-inning record with three errors in the eighth frame for the Washington Senators against the Oakland A's in 1969 one year before he led A.L. second basemen in fielding percentage. Washington 1B-OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) contributed four hits in the Senators' 11-3 victory. . . . 2B Jack Dittmer (played basketball for Iowa in 1949-50) supplied one of the Milwaukee Braves' eight homers in a 19-4 romp over the Pittsburgh Pirates in the opener of a 1953 doubleheader. . . . New York Yankees C Mike Garbark (letterman for Villanova's 25-5 squad in 1937-38 under coach Alex Severance) had four hits in a 9-7 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1944. . . . Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) homered in both ends of a 1953 doubleheader sweep of the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . INF Tim Nordbrook (letterman in 1968-69 for Loyola, LA) purchased from the Chicago White Sox by the Toronto Blue Jays in 1977. . . . In 1953, Pittsburgh Pirates rookie 2B Johnny O'Brien (consensus All-American second-team choice as junior and consensus first-team selection as senior averaged 25.8 ppg for Seattle from 1950-51 through 1952-53) supplied three contests with three hits and chipped in with a four-RBI outing in his last seven games of the month. . . . Bill Virdon (played for Drury, MO, in 1949) fired as manager of the Montreal Expos in 1984.
31 - New York Giants LF Babe Barna (West Virginia letterman in 1936 and 1937) provided a career-high four hits in a 7-6 win against the Chicago Cubs in 1942. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) supplied four hits against the Atlanta Braves in 1969. . . . California Angels rookie LF Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1970 averaged 7.4 ppg and 4 rpg) belted two homers against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1974. . . . Milwaukee Braves 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) smacked two homers against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955. . . . Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) contributed four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in the nightcap of a 1946 doubleheader. . . . P Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for Massachusetts' 15-1 freshman squad in 1971-72) traded by the Baltimore Orioles to the Toronto Blue Jays in 1987. Toronto released knuckleballer Phil Niekro to make room on roster for Flanagan. . . . 1B-OF Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) purchased from the Chicago Cubs by the Detroit Tigers in 1960. . . . Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) named manager of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1979. . . . In 1934, St. Louis Browns C Frank Grube (Lafayette starting guard as senior in 1926-27) closed out the month with his seventh multiple-hit contest in an eight-game span. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) swatted four homers in a 19-3 romp over the Boston Braves in 1950. . . . 1B-OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) purchased from the Texas Rangers by the Detroit Tigers in 1972. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Herb Kelly (played for Notre Dame from 1911-12 through 1913-14) notched his lone MLB victory (against the Brooklyn Robins in 1915). . . . P Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage in 1975-76 with Portland) traded by the Minnesota Twins to Montreal Expos in 1992. It is one of four seasons Krueger split time between the A.L. and N.L. during his career. . . . 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 as a sophomore in 1965-66) shipped by the Oakland Athletics to the Chicago Cubs in 1984 to complete an earlier deal. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) lifted after seven innings and 15 hits opposing the St. Louis Browns in 1941. It is Lyons' final incomplete MLB game as he finished three subsequent starts in 1941, all 20 in 1942 and all five in 1946 (after serving in U.S. military during World War II). . . . SS Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) banged out a career-high four of the New York Yankees' 25 hits in an 18-6 romp over the Chicago White Sox in 1974. . . . A three-run, ninth-inning homer by OF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) gave the Los Angeles Dodgers a 5-2 victory against the San Francisco Giants in 1959 when teammate Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) broke Dizzy Dean's N.L. mark and tied Bob Feller's MLB record of 18 strikeouts in a single game. . . . In 1930, Cleveland Indians 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) collected four hits and four RBI for the second time in last four games of the month. . . . In the midst of a 10-game hitting streak, Chicago White Sox rookie OF Lyle Mouton (starter in LSU's backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson for 1989 NCAA playoff team) went 4-for-4 against the Detroit Tigers in 1995. Six years later, he was shipped by the Tigers to the Houston Astros as part of a conditional deal in 2001. . . . 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) belted two homers to power the New York Yankees to a 5-4 victory against Seattle in 1977. . . . OF Irv Noren (player of year for California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) awarded off waivers from the Kansas City Athletics to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1957. . . . P Denny Riddleberger (averaged 5.7 ppg and 2.5 rpg for Old Dominion in 1965-66) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates with cash to the Washington Senators for P George Brunet in 1970. . . . Closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the New York Yankees in 1993. . . . New York Yankees P Ed Wells (multi-sport athlete graduated in 1924 from Bethany WV) hurled a one-hit shutout against the Washington Senators in the opener of a 1929 doubleheader. . . . Chicago Cubs RF Bob Will (all-league athlete was captain for Mankato State MN in 1954-55) contributed two safeties in both ends of a 1960 twinbill against the Milwaukee Braves. He had 11 multiple-hit games during the month. . . . DH Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) purchased from the Minnesota Twins by the Cleveland Indians in 1994.

MLB achievements in July by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in June by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in May by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in April by former college basketball players

A Career on Brink? Feinstein Critics Can't Hold His Laptop Carrying Case

Prior to the 1982-83 season, John Feinstein impressed Bob Knight after penning an incisive "Knight School" feature on Knight's coaching proteges in The Sporting News' inaugural Basketball Yearbook promptly challenging Street & Smith's annual edition for preseason prominence at newsstands a quarter century before they merged. Midway through the 1980s, there was testimony to the explosion of interest in college hoops when "A Season on the Brink," written by Feinstein chronicling a campaign with Indiana's storied program under Knight, emerged as the best-selling sports book of all time. Those sterling credentials among many more didn't matter much recently when the acclaimed author claimed in his Washington Post column that cocaine-overdose Fall-American Len Bias shouldn't be in Maryland's Hall of Fame.

Numerous critics challenged Feinstein's literary standing and ripped him as idiotic, inane, irrational, moronic, myopic, ridiculous, sanctimonious, simplistic, ad nauseam, until the intolerant politically-correct police shifted their ire toward ex-NFL coach Tony Dungy regarding his candid "religious-right" remark about about not wanting to get on the gay-support train with Sam Who I Am. The anti-faith lame-stream media's pitchforks and torches flourish if someone is an open Christian and advocate for traditional marriage. Of course, the country certainly needs ESPN's self-absorbed Edward R. Murrow-Olbermann lecturing us on ethics and morality rather than selfless Dungy's longstanding example.

An exceptional debate on Bias sets the generational-gap stage for displaying how American exceptionalism across-the-board is on the wane. Far too many media elite and lunatic liberals live in an ideological fantasy world of teachable moments and what should be rather than personal responsibility and what actually exists. It seems we are at a pivotal crossroads; not only in sports but the nation as a whole. As standards erode, it likely won't be long until weed no longer is a banned substance by the NCAA. The culture conflict has seasoned veterans and traditions frowned upon by individualism gone crazy. By any measure, a majority of today's strapping jocks can't hold a jock strap to #34 Bias and most of the current lapdog sports media can't hold a laptop carrying case to Feinstein.

There is a character clause attached to the UM Hall of Fame ("not been a source of embarrassment in any way"). As values erode over the decades in a celebrity-obsessed culture, dying of cocaine abuse must no longer signify a character blemish. It appears as if many permissive observers have become as delusional as former Terrapins coach Lefty Driesell, a Duke graduate who was convinced Bias had never used cocaine prior to the night of his demise. If gifted Bias had kept his nose clean and wasn't so fond of the Chapter III nightlife, the second pick overall in the 1986 NBA draft (by the Boston Celtics) boasted the potential to become an all-time great pro. Woulda. Coulda. Shoulda. Instead, he is in the Hall of Shame for anyone with fine and lasting standards in an increasingly valueless society simply looking the other way. After all, spit happens; especially when utilizing a moral-relativity cop-out regarding it's a disease and not a personal choice.

Whether or not disconcerting signs stemmed from Bias' off-the-court personal-responsibility activity, there were underachiever warnings amid a modest 5-4 NCAA playoff record and career averages of 16.4 ppg and 5.7 rpg. He was capable of so much more than being propped up as a textbook student-athlete Geek tragedy martyr of some sort. Ringing a mite hollow are his last words: "I (a horse) can handle anything." Sans an intervention (corralling a horse), odds are he would have flamed out in the NBA much like fellow "high" draft choices William Bedford and Chris Washburn. And, by the way, Juan Dixon and Joe Smith clearly had more productive Terrapin careers than Bias, who acted as a "courtesy middleman" in the drug dealing according to a prosecutor. Isn't that unsavory charge a source of embarrassment in some way? Apparently, the HOF nominating committee failed to put any stock in the book "Lenny, Lefty and the Chancellor" where C. Fraser Smith wrote: "Bias died under circumstances that were, at best, acutely embarrassing, and, at worst, immensely costly in reputation."

The Big Ten Conference lowered its on-court standards accepting Rutgers as a member. Did the league lower its off-the-court standards accepting Maryland as a member? Didn't Bias' dad accuse UM of neglecting scholastic endeavors? Diminished values spill over into all areas of our life and the consequences of piss-poor decisions are a pervert such as Sick Willie in the Out House, more tranquil abortions created than good-paying jobs, philandering preachers lecturing us on morality, IRS employee tax cheats earning bonuses, sick prankster toying with MSLSD's Mental Stall for a Democrap ditz "Eyewitness Exclusive" of a catastrophe and a bystander-in-chief out fundraising and telling lame jokes immediately after 300 people were missile murdered. Pardon the interruption, but the "Audacity of Hype" doesn't take the time to do his job and visit our porous border (If the golfer-in-chief won't defend our border then how in chutzpah is he going to provide any meaningful insight to the Israelis protecting their border?) yet recently squeezed in multiple "enlightened" outings with ESPN golfing buddy Michael Wilbon, a former colleague of Feinstein at the Washington Post. Quite frankly, did domestic violence expert Screamin' A. Stiff show up with a canned spiel to provoke anyone by inquiring if the First Lady plans to increase the national debt by taking a separate plane again on vacation?

Presuming we could discard pathetic political posturing and moral equivalency for a moment or two of diversion immersed in sports, college basketball disappoints by offering "The Carolina Way" becoming a Afro-Studies symbol for academic fraud, mediocre Duke player boasting credentials to purchase $97,800 worth of jewelry, suspect schools craving certifiable liar Bruce Pearl's wisdom to headline their program, customized classes for Air Force standouts infecting the academy, disgraced academician Jimmy V honored incessantly by ESPN and the coaching community despite North Carolina State's academic anemia during his tenure plus Slick Rick moonlighting as a porn star wannabee satisfying his dessert appetite in a deserted Louisville restaurant before giving "partner" $3,000 for "health insurance" to take care of business. Have our standards sunk even below the average SAT score for N.C. State's roster under Jim Valvano?

Feinstein wrote an illuminating TSN cover story on "Hoya Paranoia" at Georgetown under coach John Thompson Jr. for which Joltin' John endured similar flak including from intimidating Big Bad John. After all, one can't criticize a prominent African-American without risk of immediate branding as a racist. If Feinstein could go back in time, perhaps another feature assignment should have been "Terrapin What Might Have Been" focusing on what occurs during recruiting visits for regal recruits such as Bias and subsequent influences on them as impressionable teenagers before the me-myself-and-I scholars are corrupted by their surroundings and spiral out of control at many of these institutions of leftist lower learning. Some of the stimulating extracurricular activity where Bias exercised his self control was dubbed "draining the lizard" by him in the book Born Ready.

At any rate, Feinstein has forgotten more about sports and journalism than most of his biased critics ever will know. And John hasn't forgotten very much, including a proper perspective on Len Bias, who was anything but an innocent victim. Baylor's Isaiah Austin (Marfan Syndrome) was an innocent victim; not Bias. If he is worthy of Maryland's HOF, should Bias also secure a plaque in the ACC's HOF and/or the Naismith HOF? How about a Medal of Freedom honor from passive POTUS since the drug users have something in common beyond basketball? Feinstein's ill-informed detractors, who need "a season inside" his brain to raise their hoop IQs, probably believe so. Assuaging their social-justice guilt, spouting off about "a-great-career-spoiled" makes the authentically simplistic feel better about themselves.

A significant portion of the pious pot-pushing press are comparable to Brent Musburger aimlessly mouthing off to Feinstein in an unseemly fashion prior to the 1989 NCAA championship game between Michigan and Seton Hall. Compared to Feinstein, the derelict media knuckleheads, with the majority of their brain cells inactive even before ice bucket challenges, offer as much credibility as Al Bore global-warming claims as stupefying as flying Sharknado.

Men For All Seasons: Numerous MLB All-Stars Previously Played College Hoops

Four former college basketball players - Rick Ferrell, Frankie Frisch, Oral Hildebrand and Hal Schumacher - appeared in the inaugural major league baseball All-Star Game in 1933 and at least one ex-college hoopster participated in every All-Star festivity through the remainder of the 20th Century.

An annual average of seven former college hoopsters were MLB All-Stars the first half of the 1950s (including Hall of Famers Monte Irvin, Robin Roberts and Jackie Robinson). That's a higher figure that the total number of ex-college hoopsters competing at the MLB level the last several seasons. Evidence of the recent reduction of dual-sport athletes is exhibited by the fact that pitchers Chris Young (2007) and Matt Thornton (2010) are the only players in this unique category since outfielder Randy Winn (2002).

Former St. John's prize prospect Amir Garrett, who transferred to Cal State Northridge, gave up his basketball career this summer to concentrate on baseball. Garrett probably aspires to pitch in a MLB All-Star Game, but he likely will learn its more difficult to earn a spot on a MLB 40-man roster than a DI college hoop roster.

Arizona, Illinois, San Diego State and Texas A&M each have had three former hoopsters go on to become MLB All-Stars. Following is an alphabetical list of MLB All-Stars who played varsity basketball as a regular for a four-year college:

MLB All-Star Team(s) Pos. All-Star Seasons College Played Hoops
Joe Adcock Braves 1B 1960 Louisiana State
George Altman Cubs OF 1961 and 1962 Tennessee State
Glenn Beckert Cubs 2B 1969 through 1972 Allegheny (PA)
R.C. "Beau" Bell Browns OF 1937 Texas A&M
Bruce Bochte Mariners 1B 1979 Santa Clara
Frank Bolling Braves 2B 1961 and 1962 Spring Hill (AL)
Lou Boudreau* Indians SS 1940-41-42-43-44-47-48 Illinois
Ralph Branca Dodgers P 1947 through 1949 New York University
Al Bumbry Orioles OF 1980 Virginia State
Bob Cerv Athletics LF 1958 Nebraska
Tony Clark Tigers 1B 2001 Arizona/San Diego State
Mickey Cochrane* Tigers C 1934 and 1935 Boston University
Gene Conley Braves/Phillies P 1954-55-59 Washington State
George Crowe Reds 1B 1958 Indiana Central
Alvin Dark Giants SS 1951-52-54 LSU/Southwestern Louisiana
Larry Doby Indians OF 1949 through 1955 Virginia Union
Walt Dropo Red Sox 1B 1950 Connecticut
Hoot Evers Tigers OF 1948 and 1950 Illinois
Rick Ferrell* Red Sox/Senators C 1933 through 1938 and 1944 Guilford (NC)
Boo Ferriss Red Sox P 1946 Mississippi State
Frankie Frisch* Cardinals INF 1933 through 1935 Fordham
Bob Gibson* Cardinals P 1962-65-66-67-68-69-70-72 Creighton
Dick Groat Pirates/Cardinals SS 1959-60-62-63-64 Duke
Wayne Gross Athletics 3B 1977 Cal Poly Pomona
Tony Gwynn* Padres OF 1984 through 1999 (except for 1988) San Diego State
Tom Haller Giants/Dodgers C 1966 through 1968 Illinois
Atlee Hammaker Giants P 1983 East Tennessee State
Mike Hargrove Rangers OF-1B 1975 Northwestern Oklahoma State
Jim Hearn Giants P 1952 Georgia Tech
Oral Hildebrand Indians P 1933 Butler
Chuck Hinton Senators OF 1964 Shaw (NC)
Gil Hodges Dodgers 1B 1949 through 1955 and 1957 St. Joseph's (IN)/Oakland City (IN)
Frank Howard Senators OF 1968 through 1971 Ohio State
Monte Irvin* Giants OF 1952 Lincoln (PA)
Davey Johnson Orioles/Braves 2B 1968-69-70-73 Texas A&M
Duane Josephson White Sox C 1968 Northern Iowa
David Justice Braves/Indians OF 1993-94-97 Thomas More (KY)
Bob Keegan White Sox P 1954 Bucknell
Charlie Keller Yankees OF 1940-41-43-46-47 Maryland
Don Kessinger Cubs SS 1968-69-70-71-72-74 Mississippi
Jim Konstanty Phillies P 1950 Syracuse
Vance Law Cubs 3B 1988 Brigham Young
Dave Lemanczyk Blue Jays P 1979 Hartwick (NY)
Hank Lieber Giants/Cubs OF 1938-40-41 Arizona
Danny Litwhiler Phillies OF 1942 Bloomsburg (PA)
Kenny Lofton Indians/Braves OF 1994 through 1999 Arizona
Johnny Logan Braves SS 1955-57-58-59 Binghamton
Davey Lopes Dodgers 2B 1978 through 1981 Iowa Wesleyan
Jerry Lumpe Tigers 2B 1964 Southwest Missouri State
Ted Lyons* White Sox P 1939 Baylor
Bake McBride Cardinals OF 1976 Westminster (MO)
Wally Moon Cardinals/Dodgers OF 1957 and 1959 Texas A&M
Buddy Myer Senators 2B 1935 and 1937 Mississippi State
Graig Nettles Yankees/Padres 3B 1975-77-78-79-80-85 San Diego State
Bill Nicholson Cubs RF 1940-41-43-44 Washington College (MD)
Joe Niekro Astros P 1979 West Liberty (WV)
Claude Passeau Cubs P 1941-42-43-45-46 Millsaps (MS)
Gary Peters White Sox P 1964 and 1967 Grove City (PA)
Ron Reed Braves P 1968 Notre Dame
Rip Repulski Cardinals OF 1956 St. Cloud State (MN)
Robin Roberts* Phillies P 1950 through 1956 Michigan State
Jackie Robinson* Dodgers INF-OF 1949 through 1954 UCLA
Preacher Roe Dodgers P 1949 through 1952 Harding (AR)
Red Rolfe Yankees 3B 1937 through 1940 Dartmouth
Marius Russo Yankees P 1941 Long Island
Richie Scheinblum Royals OF 1972 LIU-C.W. Post (NY)
Hal Schumacher Giants P 1933 and 1935 St. Lawrence (NY)
Don Schwall Red Sox P 1961 Oklahoma
Jeff Shaw Dodgers P 1998 and 2001 Rio Grande (OH)
Norm Siebern Athletics 1B 1962 through 1964 Southwest Missouri State
Sonny Siebert Indians/Red Sox P 1966 and 1971 Missouri
Lee Smith Cubs/Cardinals/Orioles/Angels P 1983-87-91-92-93-94-95 Northwestern State
Dave Stenhouse Senators P 1962 Rhode Island
Matt Thornton White Sox P 2010 Grand Valley State (MI)
Bob Veale Pirates P 1965 and 1966 Benedictine (KS)
Wes Westrum Giants C 1952 and 1953 Bemidji State (MN)
Bill White Cardinals 1B 1959-60-61-63-64 Hiram (OH)
Sammy White Red Sox C 1953 Washington
Dave Winfield* Padres/Yankees OF 1977 through 1988 Minnesota
Randy Winn Devil Rays OF 2002 Santa Clara
Chris Young Padres P 2007 Princeton

*Baseball Hall of Famers.

Musical Chairs: 1/3 of Nation's Schools Have Changed Leagues This Century

"Man, that's messed up!" This concise summation certainly depicts higher education, which simply isn't what it used to be. Keeping remedial mathematics in mind, the Atlantic 10 Conference has more than that number of members; the Big Ten has more than 10 members and the Big 12 has fewer than 12 members. With respect to precise directions and logistics, the Atlantic Coast features Boston, Indiana (Notre Dame), Louisville, Pittsburgh and Syracuse, much of the Big East absorbs flyover country and the Southeast(ern) extends to the Midlands (Missouri and Texas A&M).

A total of 16 universities have joined different leagues for next season. That's about 1/3 of the number of schools switching alliances the previous year, but even the most ardent fan probably can't come anywhere close to naming half of the schools switching conferences the last couple of years. Heaven knows how future generations will explain the Big East split. As NFL Hall of Famer Vince Lombardi, who coached freshman basketball with Fordham, would famously say: "What the hell is going on out here?"

When Appalachian State (Sun Belt), Elon (CAA) and Davidson (Atlantic 10) departed, they became the 32nd, 33rd and 34th schools to leave the Southern Conference. Following is a school-by-school look at league affiliations over the years:

School Latest League Previous DI Conference(s)
Abilene Christian Southland (1969-73 and since 2014)
Air Force Mountain West (since 2000) WAC (1981-99)
Akron Mid-American (since 1993) Ohio Valley (1981-87)/Mid-Continent (1991 and 1992)
Alabama SEC (since 1933) Southern (1922-32)
Alabama A&M SWAC (since 2000)
Alabama State SWAC (since 1983)
Albany America East (since 2002)
American Patriot League (since 2002) ECC (1967-84)/CAA (1985-2001)
Appalachian State Sun Belt (since 2015) Southern (1972-2014)
Arizona Pac-12 (since 1979) Border (1932-61)/ WAC (1963-78)
Arizona State Pac-12 (since 1979) Border (1932-62)/WAC (1963-78)
Arkansas SEC (since 1992) SWC (1924-91)
Arkansas State Sun Belt (since 1992) Southland (1969-87)/American South (1988-91)
Army Patriot League (since 1991) MAAC (1982-90)
Auburn SEC (since 1933) Southern (1922-32)
Austin Peay Ohio Valley (since 1964)
Ball State Mid-American (since 1976)
Baylor Big 12 (since 1997) SWC (1915-96)
Belmont Ohio Valley (since 2013) Atlantic Sun (2002-12)
Binghamton America East (since 2002)
Boise State Big West (1997-2001 and since 2014) Big Sky (1971-96)/WAC (2002-11)/Mountain West (2012 and 2013)
Boston College ACC (since 2006) Big East (1980-2005)
Boston University Patriot League (since 2014) Yankee (1973-76)/America East (1980-2013)
Bowling Green Mid-American (since 1954)
Bradley Missouri Valley (1949-51 and since 1956)
Brigham Young West Coast (since 2012) Rocky Mountain (1925-37)/Skyline (1938-62)/WAC (1963-99)/Mountain West (2000-11)
Brown Ivy League (since 1954)
Bucknell Patriot League (since 1991) ECC (1959-80)
Buffalo Mid-American (since 1999) ECC (1992 and 1994)/Mid-Continent (1995-98)
Butler Big East (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1933 and 1934)/Mid-American (1947-50)/Horizon League (1980-2012)/Atlantic 10 (2013)
California Pac-12 (since 1916)
UC Davis Big West (since 2008)
UC Irvine Big West (since 1978)
Cal Poly Big West (since 1997) American West (1995 and 1996)
UC Riverside Big West (since 2002)
UC Santa Barbara Big West (1970-74 and since 1977) West Coast Athletic (1965-69)
Cal State Bakersfield WAC (since 2014)
Cal State Fullerton Big West (since 1975)
Cal State Northridge Big West (since 2002) American West (1995 and 1996)/Big Sky (1997-2001)
Campbell Big South (1986-94 and since 2012) Atlantic Sun (1995-2011)
Canisius MAAC (since 1990) ECAC North Atlantic (1980-89)
Central Arkansas Southland (since 2007)
Central Connecticut State Northeast (since 1998) ECC (1991-94)/Mid-Continent (1995-97)
Central Florida American Athletic (since 2014) Sun Belt (1992)/Atlantic Sun (1994-2005)/C-USA (2006-2013)
Central Michigan Mid-American (since 1973)
Charleston Southern Big South (since 1986)
Charlotte C-USA (1996-2005 and since 2014) Sun Belt (1977-91)/Metro (1992-95)/Atlantic 10 (2006-13)
Chattanooga Southern (since 1978)
Chicago State WAC (since 2014) Mid-Continent (1995-2006)/Great West (2010-13)
Cincinnati American Athletic (since 2014) Mid-American (1947-53)/Missouri Valley (1958-70)/Metro (1976-91)/Great Midwest (1992-95)/C-USA (1996-2005)/Big East (2006-13)
The Citadel Southern (since 1937)
Clemson ACC (since 1954) Southern (1922-53)
Cleveland State Horizon League (since 1995) Mid-Continent (1983-94)
Coastal Carolina Big South (since 1986)
Colgate Patriot League (since 1991) ECAC North Atlantic (1980-90)
College of Charleston CAA (since 2014) TAAC (1994-98)/Southern (1999-2013)
Colorado Pac-12 (since 2012) Rocky Mountain (1923-37)/Big Eight (1948-96)/Big 12 (1997-2011)
Colorado State Mountain West (since 2000) Rocky Mountain (1924-37)/Skyline (1938-62)/WAC (1970-99)
Columbia EIBL/Ivy League (since 1902)
Connecticut American Athletic (since 2014) New England/Yankee (1938-43 and 1946-76)/Big East (1980-2013)
Coppin State MEAC (since 1986)
Cornell EIBL/Ivy League (since 1902)
Creighton Big East (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1929-48 and 1977-2013)
Dartmouth EIBL/Ivy League (since 1912)
Davidson Atlantic 10 (since 2015) Southern (1937-88 and 1993-2014)/Big South (1991 and 1992)
Dayton Atlantic 10 (since 1996) Midwestern Collegiate (1989-93)/Great Midwest (1994 and 1995)
Delaware CAA (since 2002) ECC (1959-91)/America East (1992-2001)
Delaware State MEAC (since 1972)
Denver Summit League (since 2014) Rocky Mountain (1923-37)/Skyline (1938-62)/Sun Belt (2000-12)/WAC (2013)
DePaul Big East (since 2006) Great Midwest (1992-95)/C-USA (1996-2005)
Detroit Horizon League (since 1981) Missouri Valley (1950-57)
Drake Missouri Valley (1908-51 and since 1957)
Drexel CAA (since 2002) ECC (1959-91)/America East (1992-2001)
Duke ACC (since 1954) Southern (1929-53)
Duquesne Atlantic 10 (since 1977 except for 1993) Midwestern Collegiate (1993)
East Carolina American Athletic (since 2015) Southern (1966-77)/ECAC South/CAA (1983-2001)/C-USA (2002-14)
Eastern Illinois Ohio Valley (since 1997) Mid-Continent (1983-96)
Eastern Kentucky Ohio Valley (since 1949)
Eastern Michigan Mid-American (since 1975)
Eastern Washington Big Sky (since 1988)
East Tennessee State Southern (1980-2005 and since 2015) Ohio Valley (1959-78)/Southern (1980-2005)/Atlantic Sun (2006-14)
Elon CAA (since 2015) Big South (1998-2003)/Southern (2004-2014)
Evansville Missouri Valley (since 1995) Ohio Valley (1949-52)/Midwestern Collegiate (1980-94)
Fairfield MAAC (since 1982)
Fairleigh Dickinson Northeast (since 1982) Metropolitan Collegiate (1966-69)
Florida SEC (since 1933)
Florida A&M MEAC (since 1980)
Florida Atlantic C-USA (since 2014) Atlantic Sun (1996-2004)/Sun Belt (2005-13)
Florida Gulf Coast Atlantic Sun (since 2008)
Florida International C-USA (since 2014) TAAC (1992-98)/Sun Belt (1999-2013)
Florida State ACC (since 1992) Metro (1977-91)
Fordham Atlantic 10 (since 1996) MAAC (1982-90)/Patriot League (1991-95)
Fresno State Mountain West (since 2013) WCAC (1956 and 1957)/Big West (1970-92)/WAC (1993-2012)
Furman Southern (since 1937)
Gardner-Webb Big South (since 2009) Atlantic Sun (2003-08)
George Mason Atlantic 10 (since 2014) CAA (1983-2013)
Georgetown Big East (since 1980)
George Washington Atlantic 10 (since 1977) Southern (1942, 1943 and 1946-70)
Georgia SEC (since 1933) Southern (1922-32)
Georgia Southern Sun Belt (since 2015) TAAC (1981-92)/Southern (1993-2014)
Georgia State Sun Belt (1977-81 and since 2014) Atlantic Sun (1985-2005)/CAA (2006-13)
Georgia Tech ACC (since 1980) Southern (1922-32)/SEC (1933-64)/Metro (1976-78)
Gonzaga West Coast (since 1980) Big Sky (1964-79)
Grambling State SWAC (since 1959)
Grand Canyon WAC (since 2014)
Green Bay Horizon League (since 1995) Mid-Continent (1983-94)
Harvard EIBL/Ivy League (1902-09 and since 1934)
Hawaii Big West (since 2013) WAC (1980-2012)
High Point Big South (since 2000)
Hofstra CAA (since 2002) ECC (1966-94)/America East (1995-2001)
Holy Cross Patriot League (since 1991) ECAC North (1980-83)/MAAC (1984-90)
Houston American Athletic (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1951-60)/SWC (1976-96)/C-USA (1997-2013)
Houston Baptist Southland (since 2014) TAAC (1980-89)/Great West (2009-13)
Howard University MEAC (since 1972)
Idaho Big Sky (1964-96 and since 2015) Pacific Coast (1922-59)/Big Sky (1964-96)/Big West (1997-2005)/WAC (2006-14)
Idaho State Big Sky (since 1964) Rocky Mountain (1950-60)
Illinois Big Ten (since 1896)
Illinois-Chicago Horizon League (since 1995) Mid-Continent (1983-94)
Illinois State Missouri Valley (since 1981)
Incarnate Word Southland (since 2014)
Indiana Big Ten (since 1899)
Indiana State Missouri Valley (since 1977)
IPFW Summit League (since 2008)
IUPUI Summit League (since 1999)
Iona MAAC (since 1982) Metropolitan Collegiate (1966-69)
Iowa Big Ten (since 1899)
Iowa State Big 12 (since 1997) Missouri Valley (1908-28)/Big Eight (1929-96)
Jackson State SWAC (since 1959)
Jacksonville Atlantic Sun (since 1999) Sun Belt (1977-98)
Jacksonville State Ohio Valley (since 2004) TAAC/Atlantic Sun (1996-2003)
James Madison CAA (since 1983)
Kansas Big 12 (since 1997) Missouri Valley (1908-28)/Big Eight (1929-96)
Kansas State Big 12 (since 1997) Missouri Valley (1914-28)/Big Eight (1929-96)
Kennesaw State Atlantic Sun (since 2006)
Kent State Mid-American (since 1952)
Kentucky SEC (since 1933) Southern (1922-32)
Lafayette Patriot League (since 1991) ECC (1959-90)
Lamar Southland (1969-87 and since 1999) American South (1988-91)/Sun Belt (1992-98)
La Salle Atlantic 10 (since 1996) ECC (1959-83)/MAAC (1984-92)/Midwestern Collegiate (1993-95)
Lehigh Patriot League (since 1991) ECC (1959-90)
Liberty Big South (since 1992)
Lipscomb Atlantic Sun (since 2004)
Long Beach State Big West (since 1970)
Long Island Northeast (since 1982) Metropolitan Collegiate (1966-69)
Longwood Big South (since 2013)
Louisiana-Lafayette Sun Belt (since 1992) Southland (1972-82)/American South (1988-91)
Louisiana-Monroe Sun Belt (since 2007) TAAC (1980-82)/Southland (1983-2006)
Louisiana State SEC (since 1933) Southern (1923-32)
Louisiana Tech C-USA (since 2014) Southland (1972-87)/American South (1988-91)/Sun Belt (1992-2001)/WAC (2002-13)
Louisville ACC (since 2015) Missouri Valley (1965-75)/Metro (1976-95)/C-USA (1996-2005)/Big East (2006-13)/American Athletic (2014)
Loyola of Chicago Missouri Valley (since 2014) Horizon League (1980-2013)
Loyola (Md.) Patriot League (since 2014) Northeast (1982-89)/MAAC (1990-2013)
Loyola Marymount West Coast (since 1956)
Maine America East (since 1980) New England/Yankee (1938-43 and 1946-76)
Manhattan MAAC (since 1982) Metropolitan Collegiate (1966-69)
Marist MAAC (since 1998) Northeast (1982-97)
Marquette Big East (since 2006) Midwestern Collegiate (1990 & 1991)/Great Midwest (1992-95)/C-USA (1996-2005)
Marshall C-USA (since 2006) Ohio Valley (1949-52)/Mid-American (1954-69 and 1998-2005)/Southern (1978-97)
Maryland Big Ten (since 2015) Southern (1924-53)/ACC (1954-2014)
Maryland-Baltimore County America East (since 2004) ECC (1991 and 1992)/Big South (1993-98)/Northeast (1999-2003)
Maryland-Eastern Shore MEAC (1972-79 and since 1983)
Massachusetts Atlantic 10 (since 1977) New England/Yankee (1947-76)
Massachusetts-Lowell America East (since 2014)
McNeese State Southland (since 1973)
Memphis American Athletic (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1968-73)/Metro (1976-91)/Great Midwest (1992-95)/C-USA (1996-2013)
Mercer Southern (since 2015) Atlantic Sun (1980-2014)
Miami (Fla.) ACC (since 2005) Big East (1992-2004)
Miami (Ohio) Mid-American (since 1948)
Michigan Big Ten (since 1896)
Michigan State Big Ten (since 1949)
Middle Tennessee State C-USA (since 2014) Ohio Valley (1953-2000)/Sun Belt (2001-13)
Milwaukee Horizon League (since 1995) Mid-Continent (1993 and 1994)
Minnesota Big Ten (since 1896)
Mississippi SEC (since 1933) Southern (1923-32)
Mississippi State SEC (since 1933) Southern (1922-32)
Mississippi Valley State SWAC (since 1969)
Missouri SEC (since 2013) Missouri Valley (1908-28)/Big Eight (1929-96)/Big 12 (1997-2012)
Missouri-Kansas City WAC (since 2014) Summit League (1995-2013)
Missouri State Missouri Valley (since 1991) Mid-Continent (1983-90)
Monmouth MAAC (since 2014) Northeast (1986-2013)
Montana Big Sky (since 1964) Pacific Coast (1924-29)/Skyline (1952-62)
Montana State Big Sky (since 1964) Rocky Mountain (1925-57 except for 1948)/Skyline (1952-62)
Morehead State Ohio Valley (since 1949)
Morgan State MEAC (1972-80 and since 1985)
Mount St. Mary's Northeast (since 1990)
Murray State Ohio Valley (since 1949 except for 1962)
Navy Patriot League (since 1992) CAA (1983-91)
Nebraska Big Ten (since 2012) Missouri Valley (1908-28)/Big Eight (1929-96)/Big 12 (1997-2011)
Nebraska-Omaha Summit League (since 2013)
Nevada Mountain West (2013) WCAC (1970-79)/Big Sky (1980-92)/Big West (1993-2000)/WAC (2001-12)
New Hampshire America East (since 1980) New England/Yankee (1938-43 and 1946-76)
NJIT Great West (2009-13)
New Mexico Mountain West (since 2000) Border (1932-42 and 1945-51)/Skyline (1952-62)/WAC (1963-99)
New Mexico State WAC (since 2006) Border (1932-62)/Missouri Valley (1971-83)/Big West (1984-2000)/Sun Belt (2001-05)
New Orleans Southland (since 2014) Sun Belt (1977-80 and 1992-2011)/American South (1988-91)
Niagara MAAC (since 1990) ECAC North Atlantic (1980-89)
Nicholls State Southland (since 1992) Gulf Star (1985-87)
Norfolk State MEAC (since 1998)
North Carolina ACC (since 1954) Southern (1922-53)
UNC Asheville Big South (since 1986)
North Carolina A&T MEAC (since 1972)
North Carolina Central MEAC (1972-80 and since 2012)
UNC Greensboro Southern (since 1998) Big South (1993-97)
North Carolina State ACC (since 1954) Southern (1922-53)
UNC Wilmington CAA (since 1985)
North Dakota Big Sky (since 2013)
North Dakota State Summit League (since 2008)
Northern Arizona Big Sky (since 1971) Border (1932-53)
Northern Colorado Big Sky (since 2007)
Northern Illinois Mid-American (1976-86 and since 1998) Mid-Continent (1991-94)/Midwestern Collegiate (1995-97)
Northern Iowa Missouri Valley (since 1992) Mid-Continent (1983-91)
Northern Kentucky Atlantic Sun (since 2013)
North Florida Atlantic Sun (since 2006)
North Texas C-USA (since 2014) Missouri Valley (1958-75)/Southland (1983-96)/Big West (1997-2000)/Sun Belt (2001-13)
Northwestern Big Ten (since 1896)
Northwestern State Southland (since 1988) TAAC (1981-84)/Gulf Star (1985-87)
Notre Dame ACC (since 2014) Big East (1996-2013)
Oakland Horizon League (since 2014) Summit League (1999-2013)
Ohio University Mid-American (since 1947)
Ohio State Big Ten (since 1912)
Oklahoma Big 12 (since 1997) Missouri Valley (1920-28)/Big Eight (1929-96)
Oklahoma State Big 12 (since 1997) SWC (1918 and 1922-25)/Missouri Valley (1926-57)/Big Eight (1959-96)
Old Dominion C-USA (since 2014) Sun Belt (1983-91)/CAA (1992-2013)
Oral Roberts Summit League (1998-2012 and since 2015) Midwestern Collegiate (1980-87)/Southland (2013 and 2014)
Oregon Pac-12 (1916-59 and since 1965)
Oregon State Pac-12 (1916-59 and since 1965)
Pacific WCAC/WCC (1953-71 and since 2014) Big West (1972-2013)
Penn EIBL/Ivy League (since 1904)
Penn State Big Ten (since 1993) Atlantic 10 (1977-79 and 1983-91)
Pepperdine West Coast (since 1956)
Pittsburgh ACC (since 2014) Eastern 8 (1977-82)/Big East (1983-2013)
Portland West Coast (since 1977)
Portland State Big Sky (since 1997)
Prairie View SWAC (since 1921 except for 1991)
Presbyterian Big South (since 2010)
Princeton EIBL/Ivy League (since 1902)
Providence Big East (since 1980)
Purdue Big Ten (since 1896)
Quinnipiac MAAC (since 2014) Northeast (1999-2013)
Radford Big South (since 1986)
Rhode Island Atlantic 10 (since 1981) New England/Yankee (1938-43 and 1946-76)/ECAC North (1980)
Rice C-USA (since 2006) SWC (1915-96)/WAC (1997-2005)
Richmond Atlantic 10 (since 2002) Southern (1937-76)/CAA (1983-2001)
Rider MAAC (since 1998) ECC (1967-92)/Northeast (1993-97)
Robert Morris Northeast (since 1982)
Rutgers Big Ten (since 2015) Middle Atlantic (1959-62)/Atlantic 10 (1977-95)/Big East (1996-2013)/American Athletic (2014)
Sacramento State Big Sky (since 1997) American West (1995 and 1996)
Sacred Heart Northeast (since 2000)
St. Bonaventure Atlantic 10 (since 1980)
St. Francis (N.Y.) Northeast (since 1982) Metropolitan Collegiate (1966-68)
Saint Francis (Pa.) Northeast (since 1982)
St. John's Big East (since 1980)
Saint Joseph's Atlantic 10 (since 1983) ECC (1959-82)
Saint Louis Atlantic 10 (since 2006) Missouri Valley (1938-74)/Metro (1976-82)/Midwestern Collegiate (1983-91)/Great Midwest (1992-95)/C-USA (1996-2005)
Saint Mary's West Coast (since 1953)
Saint Peter's MAAC (since 1982) Metropolitan Collegiate (1966-69)
Samford Ohio Valley (since 2004) Atlantic Sun (1980-2003)
Sam Houston State Southland (since 1988) Gulf Star (1985-87)
San Diego West Coast (since 1980)
San Diego State PCAA/Big West (1970-78 and since 2014) WAC (1979-99)/Mountain West (2000-13)
San Francisco West Coast (since 1953)
San Jose State Mountain West (since 2014) WCAC (1953-69)/Big West (1970-96)/WAC (1997-2013)
Santa Clara West Coast (since 1953)
Savannah State MEAC (since 2012)
Seattle WAC (since 2013) WCAC (1972-80)
Seton Hall Big East (since 1980) Metropolitan Collegiate (1966-69)
Siena MAAC (since 1990) Northeast (1982-84)/ECAC North Atlantic (1985-89)
South Alabama Sun Belt (since 1977)
South Carolina SEC (since 1992) Southern (1923-53)/ACC (1954-71)/Metro (1984-91)
South Carolina State MEAC (since 1972)
USC Upstate Atlantic Sun (since 2008)
South Dakota Big Sky (since 2013) Great West (2009-12)
South Dakota State Summit League (since 2008)
Southeastern Louisiana Southland (since 1998) Gulf Star (1985-87)/TAAC (1992-97)
Southeast Missouri State Ohio Valley (since 1992)
Southern (La.) SWAC (since 1935)
Southern California Pac-12 (since 1922)
Southern Illinois Missouri Valley (since 1975)
SIU-Edwardsville Ohio Valley (since 2012)
Southern Methodist American Athletic (since 2014) SWC (1919-96)/WAC (1997-2005)/C-USA (2006-13)
Southern Mississippi C-USA (since 1996) Metro (1983-95)
Southern Utah Big Sky (since 2013) American West (1995 and 1996)/Summit League (1998-2012)
South Florida American Athletic (since 2014) Sun Belt (1977-91)/Metro (1992-95)/C-USA (1996-2005)/Big East (2006-13)
Stanford Pac-12 (since 1917)
Stephen F. Austin Southland (since 1988) Gulf Star (1985-87)
Stetson Atlantic Sun (since 1987)
Stony Brook America East (since 2002)
Syracuse ACC (since 2014) Big East (1980-2013)
Temple American Athletic (since 2014) ECC (1959-82)/Atlantic 10 (1983-2013)
Tennessee SEC (since 1933) Southern (1922-32)
Tennessee-Martin Ohio Valley (since 1993)
Tennessee State Ohio Valley (since 1988)
Tennessee Tech Ohio Valley (since 1949)
Texas Big 12 (since 1997) SWC (1915-96)
Texas A&M SEC (since 2013) SWC (1915-96)/Big 12 (1997-2012)
Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Southland (since 2007)
Texas-Arlington Sun Belt (since 2014) Southland (1969-2012 except for 1987)/WAC (2013)
Texas Christian Big 12 (since 2013) SWC (1924-96)/WAC (1997-2001)/C-USA (2002-05)/Mountain West (2006-12)
Texas-El Paso C-USA (since 2006) Border (1936-62)/WAC (1970-2005)
Texas-Pan American WAC (since 2014) TAAC (1980)/American South (1988-91)/Sun Belt (1992-98)/Great West (2009-13)
Texas-San Antonio C-USA (since 2014) TAAC (1987-91)/Southland (1992-2012)/WAC (2013)
Texas Southern SWAC (since 1955)
Texas State Sun Belt (since 2014) Gulf Star (1985-87)/Southland (1988-2012)/WAC (2013)
Texas Tech Big 12 (since 1997) Border (1933-56)/SWC (1958-96)
Toledo Mid-American (since 1952)
Towson CAA (since 2002) Northeast (1982)/ECC (1983-92)/Big South (1993-95)/America East (1996-2001)
Troy Sun Belt (since 2006) ECC (1994)/Mid-Continent (1995-97)/Atlantic Sun (1998-2005)
Tulane American Athletic (since 2015) Southern (1923-32)/SEC (1933-66)/Metro (1976-85 and 1990-95)/C-USA (1996-2014)
Tulsa American Athletic (since 2015) Missouri Valley (1935-96)/WAC (1997-2005)/C-USA (2006-14)
UAB C-USA (since 1996) Sun Belt (1980-91)/Great Midwest (1992-95)
UALR Sun Belt (since 1992) TAAC (1981-91)
UCLA Pac-12 (since 1928)
UNLV Mountain West (since 2000) WCAC (1970-75)/Big West (1983-96)/WAC (1997-99)
Utah Pac-12 (since 2012) Rocky Mountain (1925-37)/Skyline (1938-62)/WAC (1963-99)/Mountain West (2000-11)
Utah State Mountain West (since 2014) Rocky Mountain (1925-37)/Skyline (1938-62)/Big West (1979-2005)/WAC (2006-13)
Utah Valley WAC (since 2014) Great West (2009-13)
Valparaiso Horizon League (since 2008) Mid-Continent (1983-2007)
Vanderbilt SEC (since 1933) Southern (1923-32)
Vermont America East (since 1980) New England/Yankee (1947-76)
Villanova Big East (since 1981) Eastern Athletic Association (1977-80)
Virginia ACC (since 1954) Southern (1922-37)
Virginia Commonwealth Atlantic 10 (since 2013) Sun Belt (1980-91)/Metro (1992-95)/CAA (1996-2013)
Virginia Military Southern (1926-2003 and since 2015) Big South (2004-14)
Virginia Tech ACC (since 2005) Southern (1922-65)/Metro (1979-95)/Atlantic 10 (1996-2000)/Big East (2001-04)
Wagner Northeast (since 1982)
Wake Forest ACC (since 1954) Southern (1937-53)
Washington Pac-12 (since 1916)
Washington State Pac-12 (1917-59 and since 1964)
Weber State Big Sky (since 1964)
Western Carolina Southern (since 1978)
Western Illinois Summit League (since 1983)
Western Kentucky C-USA (since 2015) Ohio Valley (1949-82)/Sun Belt (1983-2014)
Western Michigan Mid-American (since 1948)
West Virginia Big 12 (since 2013) Southern (1951-68)/Atlantic 10 (1977-95)/Big East (1996-2012)
Wichita State Missouri Valley (since 1946)
William & Mary CAA (since 1983) Southern (1937-77)
Winthrop Big South (since 1986)
Wisconsin Big Ten (since 1896)
Wofford Southern (since 1998)
Wright State Horizon League (since 1995) Mid-Continent (1992-94)
Wyoming Mountain West (since 2000) Rocky Mountain (1923-37)/Mountain States (1938-62)/WAC (1963-99)
Xavier Big East (since 2014) Midwestern Collegiate (1980-95)/Atlantic 10 (1996-2013)
Yale EIBL/Ivy League (since 1902)
Youngstown State Horizon League (since 2002) Ohio Valley (1982-88)/Mid-Continent (1992-2001)

The Wonder Years: Only Two Power League Schools Set Single-Season Mark

Toledo's winningest team in history last season (27-7/coached by Tod Kowalczyk) broke a school standard (24-6) that was in existence since 1939-40. Other universities setting or tying records for most triumphs in a single Division I season last year included Florida (36-3/Billy Donovan), Wichita State (35-1/Gregg Marshall), Stephen F. Austin (32-3/Brad Underwood), Virginia (30-7/Tony Bennett), Louisiana Tech (29-8/Michael White), Southern Mississippi (29-7/Donnie Tyndall), North Carolina Central (28-6/LeVelle Moton), Harvard (27-5/Tommy Amaker), Mercer (27-9/Bob Hoffman), North Dakota State (26-7/Saul Phillips), IPFW (25-11/Tony Jasick), Towson (25-11/Patrick Skerry), Radford (22-13/Mike Jones), Incarnate Word (21-6/Ken Burmeister) and North Florida (16-16/Matthew Driscoll).

Only two power league members - Florida and Virginia - set or tied school marks last year. Fellow power league members Colorado, Georgia, Northwestern and Southern California still need to win as many as 25 games in a single season. Although schedules include significantly more games than several decades ago, seven Pac-12 Conference members are among the 15 power league members who first set their existing single-season record for victories before the NCAA playoffs expanded to at least 32 teams in 1975. Following is a school-by-school look at the scoring and rebounding leaders for teams when they posted a school's winningest season at the DI level:

School Most Wins Season Scoring Leader Rebounding Leader
Abilene Christian 17-8 1971-72 Kent Martens (15.4 ppg) Willie Calvert (14.2 rpg)
Air Force 24-7 2005-06 Antoine Hood (14.9) Jacob Burtschi (6.1)
Akron 26-7 2006-07 Romeo Travis (14.9) Jeremiah Wood (7.8)
Akron 26-7 2012-13 Zeke Marshall (13) Demetrius Tree Treadwell (7.9)
Alabama 28-5 1986-87 Derrick McKey (18.6) Michael Ansley (7.8)
Alabama A&M 19-10 2001-02 Desmond Cambridge (20.7) Garik Nicholson (6.1)
Alabama State 22-6 1982-83 Lewis Jackson (23.8) Joe Williams (7.6)
Alabama State 22-6 1983-84 Lewis Jackson (29) Joe Williams (7.7)
Alabama State 22-10 2008-09 Brandon Brooks (13.7) Wesley Jones (6.5)
Albany 24-11 2012-13 Mike Black (14.8) Sam Rowley (6.2)
Alcorn State 28-1 1978-79 Larry Smith (17.6) Larry Smith (13.7)
American 24-6 1980-81 Russell "Boo" Bowers (23.5) Russell "Boo" Bowers (6.6)
American 24-8 2008-09 Garrison Carr (17.9) Brian Gilmore (5.4)
Appalachian State 25-8 2006-07 D.J. Thompson (15.6) Jeremy Clayton (7.1)
Arizona 35-3 1987-88 Sean Elliott (19.6) Anthony Cook (7.1)
Arizona State 26-3 1962-63 Joe Caldwell (19.7) Art Becker (11.2)
Arkansas 34-4 1990-91 Todd Day (20.7) Oliver Miller (7.7)
Arkansas-Little Rock 26-11 1986-87 Curtis Kidd (15.6) Curtis Kidd (8.4)
Arkansas-Pine Bluff 18-16 2009-10 Terrance Calvin (10.2) Lebaron Weathers (6.7)
Arkansas State 23-9 1990-91 Bobby Gross (15.4) Fred Shepherd (6.9)
Army 22-6 1969-70 Jim Oxley (15.6) Max Miller (7.5)
Auburn 29-4 1998-99 Chris Porter (16) Chris Porter (8.6)
Austin Peay 24-4 1976-77 Calvin Garrett (17.4) Otis Howard (8.3)
Austin Peay 24-11 2007-08 Drake Reed (14.4) Fernandez Lockett (6.8)
Ball State 29-3 1988-89 Curtis Kidd (14) Paris McCurdy (8.5)
Baylor 30-8 2011-12 Pierre Jackson (13.8) Perry Jones III (7.6)
Belmont 30-5 2010-11 Ian Clark (12.2) Mick Hedgepeth (5.9)
Bethune-Cookman 21-13 2010-11 C.J. Reed (18.8) Alexander Starling (6.7)
Binghamton 23-9 2008-09 D.J. Rivera (20) Reggie Fuller (7)
Birmingham-Southern 19-9 2002-03 Josiah James (13.7) Josiah James (6.3)
Birmingham-Southern 19-9 2005-06 James Collins (13) Sredrick Powe (6.1)
Boise State 25-9 2007-08 Reggie Larry (19.4) Reggie Larry (9.2)
Boston College 27-5 2000-01 Troy Bell (20.4) Kenny Harley (5.6)
Boston University 25-5 1996-97 Tunji Awojobi (19.4) Tunji Awojobi (10.2)
Bowling Green 28-7 1946-47 Charles Share (9.1) unavailable
Bradley 32-5 1949-50 Paul Unruh (12.8) unavailable
Bradley 32-6 1950-51 Gene Melchiorre (11.3) unavailable
Bradley 32-3 1985-86 Hersey Hawkins (18.7) Mike Williams (7.1)
Brigham Young 32-5 2010-11 Jimmer Fredette (28.9) Brandon Davies (6.2)
Brown 19-10 2007-08 Mark McAndrew (16.5) Chris Skrelia (6.6)
Bryant 19-12 2012-13 Dyami Starks (17.7) Alex Francis (8.6)
Bucknell 28-6 2012-13 Mike Muscala (18.7) Mike Muscala (11.1)
Buffalo 23-10 2004-05 Turner Battle (15.5) Yassin Idbihi (5.9)
Butler 33-5 2009-10 Gordon Hayward (15.5) Gordon Hayward (8.2)
California 30-6 1945-46 Andy Wolfe (13.4) unavailable
UC Irvine 25-5 2000-01 Jerry Green (19) Adam Parada (6.2)
Cal Poly 19-11 2006-07 Derek Stockalper (14.4) Derek Stockalper (7)
UC Riverside 17-13 2008-09 Kyle Austin (16.2) Aaron Scott (6.6)
UC Santa Barbara 23-9 2007-08 Alex Harris (20.2) Ivan Elliott (5.7)
Cal State Fullerton 24-9 2007-08 Josh Akognon (20.2) Scott Cutley (7.4)
Cal State Northridge 22-10 2000-01 Brian Heinle (20.2) Brian Heinle (9.2)
Cal State Sacramento 15-15 2005-06 Alex Bausley (13.6) Jason Harris (5.5)
Campbell 20-9 1993-94 Joe Spinks (20.9) Joe Spinks (8.8)
Canisius 22-6 1956-57 Henry Nowak (20.1) Henry Nowak (10.7)
Canisius 22-7 1993-94 Craig Wise (16.1) Micheal Meeks (7.5)
Centenary 25-4 1974-75 Robert Parish (18.9) Robert Parish (15.4)
Central Arkansas 14-16 2007-08 Nate Bowie (17.5) Durrell Nevels (8)
Central Connecticut State 27-5 2001-02 Corsley Edwards (15.4) Ron Robinson (9.3)
Central Florida 25-6 2003-04 Dexter Lyons (18.3) Roberto Morentin (6.9)
Central Michigan 25-7 2002-03 Chris Kaman (22.4) Chris Kaman (12)
Charleston Southern 21-9 1985-86 Ben Hinson (19.7) Bernard Innocent (7.3)
Charleston Southern 21-9 1986-87 Ben Hinson (22.6) Oliver Johnson (8.7)
Charlotte 28-5 1976-77 Cedric "Cornbread" Maxwell (22.2) Cedric "Cornbread" Maxwell (12.1)
Chattanooga 27-4 1981-82 Willie White (15.8) Russ Schoene (7)
Chicago State 22-6 1985-86 Darron Brittman (18.2) Shawn Bell (6.7)
Cincinnati 31-4 2001-02 Steve Logan (22) Donald Little (6.9)
The Citadel 20-7 1978-79 Tom Slawson (17.1) Tom Slawson (6.6)
The Citadel 20-13 2008-09 Demetrius Nelson (16.4) Demetrius Nelson (6.5)
Clemson 25-6 1986-87 Horace Grant (21) Horace Grant (9.6)
Cleveland State 29-4 1985-86 Clinton Smith (16.2) Eric Mudd (8.3)
Coastal Carolina 28-7 2009-10 Chad Gray (14.3) Joseph Harris (9.6)
Coastal Carolina 28-6 2010-11 Desmond Holloway (18.5) Sam McLaurin (7)
Colgate 18-10 1992-93 Tucker Neale (21.9) Darren Brown (11.3)
Colgate 18-14 2007-08 Kyle Roemer (16.2) Alex Woodhouse (6.3)
College of Charleston 29-3 1996-97 Thaddeous Delaney (15.8) Thaddeous Delaney (9.5)
Colorado 24-14 2010-11 Alec Burks (20.5) Andre Roberson (7.8)
Colorado 24-12 2011-12 Carlon Brown (12.6) Andre Roberson (11.1)
Colorado State 26-9 2012-13 Colton Iverson (14.2) Colton Iverson (9.8)
Columbia 23-5 1967-68 Jim McMillian (22.3) Jim McMillian (9.8)
Connecticut 34-2 1998-99 Richard Hamilton (21.5) Kevin Freeman (7.3)
Coppin State 26-7 1989-90 Reggie Isaac (21.2) Larry Stewart (11.2)
Cornell 29-5 2009-10 Ryan Wittman (17.5) Jeff Foote (8.1)
Creighton 29-5 2002-03 Kyle Korver (17.8) Kyle Korver (6.3)
Creighton 29-6 2011-12 Doug McDermott (22.9) Doug McDermott (8.2)
Dartmouth 22-4 1941-42 George Munroe (15) unavailable
Dartmouth 22-5 1957-58 Rudy LaRusso (15.3) Rudy LaRusso (18.6)
Dartmouth 22-6 1958-59 Rudy LaRusso (18.9) Rudy LaRusso (16.1)
Davidson 29-5 2006-07 Stephen Curry (21.5) Boris Meno (8.2)
Davidson 29-7 2007-08 Stephen Curry (25.9) Andrew Lovedale/Boris Meno (5.4)
Dayton 28-5 1951-52 Don Meineke (21.1) Don Meineke (11.7)
Delaware 27-4 1991-92 Alex Coles (14.3) Spencer Dunkley (8.8)
Delaware State 21-14 2005-06 Jahsha Bluntt (14.6) Jahsha Bluntt (4.8)
Delaware State 21-12 2006-07 Roy Bright (15.5) Jahsha Bluntt (4.9)
Denver 22-10 2012-13 Chris Udofia (13.3) Royce O'Neale (5.5)
DePaul 28-3 1986-87 Dallas Comegys (17.5) Dallas Comegys (7.5)
Detroit 25-4 1976-77 John Long (20.3) Terry Tyler (11)
Detroit 25-4 1977-78 John Long (21.4) Terry Tyler (12.6)
Detroit 25-6 1997-98 Derrick Hayes (13.8) Brian Alexander (7.1)
Detroit 25-12 2000-01 Rashad Phillips (22.4) Terrell Riggs (6.5)
Drake 28-5 2007-08 Josh Young (15.9) Jonathan Cox (8.6)
Drexel 29-7 2011-12 Frantz Massenat (13.7) Samme Givens (7.9)
Duke 37-3 1985-86 Johnny Dawkins (20.2) Mark Alarie (6.2)
Duke 37-2 1998-99 Elton Brand (17.7) Elton Brand (9.8)
Duquesne 26-3 1953-54 Dick Ricketts (17.2) Jim Tucker (13.6)
East Carolina 23-12 2012-13 Maurice Kemp (18.9) Robert Sampson (9.2)
Eastern Illinois 21-10 2000-01 Kyle Hill (23.8) Henry Domercant (6.8)
Eastern Kentucky 25-10 2012-13 Glenn Cosey (15.2) Eric Stutz (4.7)
Eastern Michigan 26-7 1990-91 Marcus Kennedy (20) Marcus Kennedy (8.1)
Eastern Washington 20-8 1985-86 Roosevelt Brown (16.3) John Randa (9.2)
East Tennessee State 28-5 1990-91 Keith "Mister" Jennings (20.1) Rodney English (5.8)
Elon 21-12 2012-13 Lucas Troutman (15.1) Ryley Beaumont (7.1)
Evansville 25-6 1988-89 Scott Haffner (24.5) Dan Godfread (8)
Fairfield 25-8 2010-11 Derek Needham (14.1) Ryan Olander (6.8)
Fairleigh Dickinson 23-7 1987-88 Jaime Latney (18.3) Jaime Latney (8)
Fairleigh Dickinson 23-7 1997-98 Elijah Allen/Rahshon Turner (17.8) Rahshon Turner (10.8)
Florida 36-3 2013-14 Casey Prather (13.8) Dorian Finney-Smith (6.7)
Florida A&M 22-8 1987-88 Aldwin Ware (19.5) Aldwin Ware (5.3)
Florida Atlantic 21-11 2010-11 Greg Gantt (14) Brett Royster (6)
Florida Gulf Coast 26-11 2012-13 Sherwood Brown (15.5) Sherwood Brown (6.5)
Florida International 21-8 1997-98 Raja Bell (16.6) Darius Cook (6.1)
Florida State 27-6 1971-72 Ron King (17.9) Reggie Royals (11)
Fordham 26-3 1970-71 Charlie Yelverton (23.3) Charlie Yelverton (12)
Fresno State 27-3 1981-82 Rod Higgins (15.1) Rod Higgins (6.3)
Furman 23-7 1979-80 Jonathan Moore (18.4) Jonathan Moore (10.1)
Gardner-Webb 23-9 2001-02 Bruce Fields (12.4) Bruce Fields (8.2)
George Mason 27-8 2005-06 Jai Lewis (13.7) Jai Lewis (7.8)
George Mason 27-7 2010-11 Cameron Long (15.1) Ryan Pearson (6.7)
Georgetown 35-3 1984-85 Patrick Ewing (14.6) Patrick Ewing (9.2)
George Washington 27-3 2005-06 Danilo Pinnock (14.5) Mike Hall (7.6)
Georgia 24-10 1982-83 Vern Fleming (16.9) Terry Fair (6.6)
Georgia Southern 25-6 1991-92 Tony Windless (17.6) Dexter Abrams (7.4)
Georgia State 29-5 2000-01 Shernard Long (18) Thomas Terrell (7.5)
Georgia Tech 28-7 1989-90 Dennis Scott (27.7) Malcolm Mackey (7.5)
Gonzaga 32-3 2012-13 Kelly Olynyk (17.8) Elias Harris (7.4)
Grambling State 22-8 1979-80 Robert Williams (17.9) Robert Williams (10.1)
Green Bay 27-7 1993-94 Jeff Nordgaard (15.6) Jeff Nordgaard (6.4)
Hampton 26-7 2001-02 Tommy Adams (19.7) Isaac Jefferson (9.4)
Hartford 18-16 2007-08 Joe Zeglinski (16.2) Michael Turner (5.5)
Harvard 27-5 2013-14 Wesley Saunders (14.2) Steve Moundou-Missi (6)
Hawaii 27-6 2001-02 Predrag Savovic (20.3) Haim Shimonovich (6.6)
High Point 19-11 2003-04 Danny Gathings (15.8) Danny Gathings (8)
Hofstra 26-5 2000-01 Norman Richardson (16.7) Greg Springfield (7.3)
Holy Cross 27-3 1946-47 George Kaftan (11.1) unavailable
Holy Cross 27-4 1949-50 Bob Cousy (19.4) unavailable
Houston 32-5 1983-84 Michael Young (19.8) Hakeem Olajuwon (13.5)
Houston Baptist 24-7 1983-84 Terry Hairston (14.7) Anicet Lavodrama (7.1)
Howard 24-4 1986-87 George Hamilton (12.8) John Spencer (9.3)
Idaho 27-3 1981-82 Ken Owens (15.6) Ke vin Smith (6.5)
Idaho State 25-5 1976-77 Steve Hayes (20.2) Steve Hayes (11.1)
Illinois 37-2 2004-05 Luther Head (15.9) James Augustine (7.6)
Illinois-Chicago 24-8 2003-04 Cedric Banks (18.4) Armond Williams (5.8)
Illinois State 25-6 1997-98 Rico Hill (18.4) Rico Hill (7.5)
Illinois State 25-10 2007-08 Osiris Eldridge (15.8) Anthony Slack (7.1)
Incarnate Word 21-6 2013-14 Denzel Livingston (20.3) Ian Markolf (7.4)
Indiana 32-0 1975-76 Scott May (23.5) Kent Benson (8.8)
Indiana State 33-1 1978-79 Larry Bird (28.6) Larry Bird (14.9)
IPFW 25-11 2013-14 Luis Jacobo (15.3) Joe Reed (5.3)
IUPUI 26-7 2007-08 George Hill (21.5) George Hill (6.8)
Iona 29-5 1979-80 Jeff Ruland (20.1) Jeff Ruland (12)
Iowa 30-5 1986-87 Roy Marble Jr. (14.9) Brad Lohaus (7.7)
Iowa State 32-5 1999-00 Marcus Fizer (22.8) Marcus Fizer (7.7)
Jackson State 25-9 1992-93 Lindsey Hunter (26.7) Godfrey Thompson (7.1)
Jacksonville 27-2 1969-70 Artis Gilmore (26.5) Artis Gilmore (22.2)
Jacksonville State 20-10 2002-03 Omar Barlett (15) Omar Barlett (7.1)
James Madison 24-6 1981-82 Linton Townes (16.3) Dan Ruland (6.3)
Kansas 35-4 1985-86 Danny Manning (16.7) Danny Manning (6.3)
Kansas 35-4 1997-98 Paul Pierce (20.5) Raef LaFrentz (11.4)
Kansas 35-3 2010-11 Marcus Morris (17.2) Markieff Morris (8.3)
Kansas State 29-8 2009-10 Jacob Pullen (19.3) Curtis Kelly (6.2)
Kent State 30-6 2001-02 Trevor Huffman (16) Antonio Gates (8.1)
Kentucky 38-2 2011-12 Anthony Davis (14.2) Anthony Davis (10.4)
Lafayette 24-7 1999-00 Brian Ehlers (17.3) Stefan Ciosici (6.5)
Lamar 26-5 1983-84 Tom Sewell (22.9) Kenneth Perkins (7.4)
La Salle 30-2 1989-90 Lionel Simmons (26.5) Lionel Simmons (11.1)
Lehigh 27-8 2011-12 C.J. McCollum (21.9) C.J. McCollum (6.5)
Liberty 23-9 1996-97 Peter Aluma (15.7) Peter Aluma (6.6)
Liberty 23-12 2008-09 Seth Curry (20.2) Anthony Smith (6.5)
Lipscomb 21-11 2005-06 Eddie Ard (16.2) Shaun Durant (7.2)
Long Beach State 26-3 1972-73 Ed Ratleff (22.8) Leonard Gray (9.3)
Long Island 28-3 1936-37 Jules Bender (9.1) unavailable
Longwood 17-14 2008-09 Dana Smith (14.8) Dana Smith (6.4)
Louisiana-Lafayette 25-4 1971-72 Dwight "Bo" Lamar (36.3) Roy Ebron (14.2)
Louisiana-Lafayette 25-9 1999-00 Orlando Butler (13.1) Lonnie Thomas (7.2)
Louisiana-Monroe 26-5 1992-93 Ryan Stuart (21.1) Ryan Stuart (9.5)
Louisiana State 31-5 1980-81 Howard Carter (16) Durand "Rudy" Macklin (9.8)
Louisiana Tech 29-3 1984-85 Karl Malone (16.5) Karl Malone (9)
Louisiana Tech 29-8 2013-14 Alex Hamilton (14.5) Michale Kyser (6.6)
Louisville 35-5 2012-13 Russ Smith (18.7) Gorgui Dieng (9.4)
Loyola Chicago 29-2 1962-63 Jerry Harkness (21.4) Les Hunter (11.4)
Loyola (Md.) 24-9 2011-12 Erik Etherly (13.7) Erik Etherly (7.5)
Loyola Marymount 28-4 1987-88 Eric "Hank" Gathers (22.5) Eric "Hank" Gathers (8.7)
Maine 24-7 1999-00 Nate Fox (17.5) Nate Fox (7.5)
Manhattan 26-5 1994-95 Ted Ellis (14) Jason Hoover (6.4)
Marist 25-9 2006-07 Will Whittington (17.6) James Smith (6)
Marquette 28-1 1970-71 Dean Meminger (21.2) Jim Chones (11.5)
Marshall 25-6 1983-84 LaVerne Evans (20.5) Jeff Battle (4.5)
Marshall 25-6 1986-87 James "Skip" Henderson (21) Rodney Holden (8.8)
Maryland 32-4 2001-02 Juan Dixon (20.4) Lonny Baxter (8.2)
Maryland-Baltimore County 24-9 2007-08 Ray Barbosa (16.5) Darryl Proctor (8.4)
Maryland-Eastern Shore 27-2 1973-74 Rubin Collins (18) Joe Pace (12.8)
Massachusetts 35-2 1995-96 Marcus Camby (20.5) Marcus Camby (8.1)
McNeese State 21-11 1985-86 Jerome Batiste (18.4) Jerome Batiste (8.6)
McNeese State 21-9 2001-02 Jason Coleman (14.4) Fred Gentry (7.2)
McNeese State 21-12 2010-11 Patrick Richard (16.1) P.J. Alawoya (10.3)
Memphis 38-2 2007-08 Chris Douglas-Roberts (18.1) Joey Dorsey (9.5)
Mercer 27-11 2011-12 Langston Hall (11.4) Jake Gollon (5.9)
Mercer 27-9 2013-14 Langston Hall (14.6) Daniel Coursey (6.4)
Miami (Fla.) 29-7 2012-13 Shane Larkin (14.5) Reggie Johnson (7)
Miami (Ohio) 24-6 1983-84 Ron Harper (16.3) Ron Harper (7.6)
Miami (Ohio) 24-8 1998-99 Wally Szczerbiak (24.2) Wally Szczerbiak (8.5)
Michigan 31-5 1992-93 Chris Webber (19.2) Chris Webber (10.1)
Michigan State 33-5 1998-99 Morris Peterson (13.6) Antonio Smith (8.4)
Middle Tennessee State 28-6 2012-13 Marcos Knight (12.6) Marcos Knight (5.8)
Milwaukee 26-6 2004-05 Ed McCants (17.4) Adrian Tigert (6.7)
Minnesota 31-4 1996-97 Bobby Jackson (15.3) Courtney James (7.2)
Mississippi 27-8 2000-01 Rahim Lockhart (13) Rahim Lockhart (8.1)
Mississippi 27-9 2012-13 Marshall Henderson (20.1) Murphy Holloway (9.7)
Mississippi State 27-8 2001-02 Mario Austin (16.1) Mario Austin (7.6)
Mississippi Valley State 22-7 1995-96 Marcus Mann (21.7) Marcus Mann (13.6)
Mississippi Valley State 22-7 2003-04 Attarrius Norwood (14.3) Willie Neal (7.6)
Missouri 31-7 2008-09 DeMarre Carroll (16.6) DeMarre Carroll (7.2)
Missouri-Kansas City 20-8 1991-92 Tony Dumas (21.5) David Robinson (6.8)
Missouri State 28-6 1986-87 Winston Garland (21.2) Greg Bell (7)
Monmouth 21-10 2000-01 Rahsaan Johnson (19.1) Rahsaan Johnson (6.1)
Monmouth 21-12 2003-04 Blake Hamilton (16.3) Blake Hamilton (6.4)
Montana 27-4 1991-92 Delvon Anderson (14.5) Daren Engellant (8.8)
Montana State 36-2 1927-28 John "Cat" Thompson (16.6) unavailable
Montana State 36-2 1928-29 John "Cat" Thompson (16.6) unavailable
Morehead State 25-6 1983-84 Earl Harrison (12.9) Earl Harrison (7.6)
Morehead State 25-10 2010-11 Kenneth Faried (17.3) Kenneth Faried (14.5)
Morgan State 27-10 2009-10 Reggie Holmes (21.4) Kevin Thompson (11.8)
Mount St. Mary's 21-8 1995-96 Chris McGuthrie (22.3) Riley Inge (6.5)
Murray State 31-5 2009-10 B.J. Jenkins (10.6) Tony Easley (5.8)
Murray State 31-2 2011-12 Isaiah Canaan (19) Ivan Aska (6)
Navy 30-5 1985-86 David Robinson (22.7) David Robinson (13)
Nebraska 26-8 1990-91 Rich King (15.5) Rich King (8.1)
Nevada 29-5 2006-07 Nick Fazekas (20.4) Nick Fazekas (11.1)
New Hampshire 19-9 1994-95 Matt Alosa (23.1) Scott Drapeau (9.8)
NJIT 16-13 2012-13 Chris Flores (16.9) Daquan Holiday (4.9)
New Mexico 30-5 2009-10 Darington Hobson (15.9) Darington Hobson (9.3)
New Mexico State 27-3 1969-70 Jimmy Collins (24.6) Sam Lacey (15.9)
New Orleans 26-4 1986-87 Ledell Eackles (22.6) Ronnie Grandison (9.7)
New Orleans 26-4 1992-93 Ervin Johnson (18.4) Ervin Johnson (11.9)
Niagara 27-4 1921-22 unavailable unavailable
Nicholls State 24-6 1994-95 Reggie Jackson (21.6) Reggie Jackson (10.8)
Norfolk State 26-10 2011-12 Kyle O'Quinn (15.9) Kyle O'Quinn (10.3)
North Carolina 36-3 2007-08 Tyler Hansbrough (22.6) Tyler Hansbrough (10.2)
UNC Asheville 24-10 2011-12 Matt Dickey (16.1) Jeremy Atkinson (6.6)
North Carolina A&T 26-3 1987-88 Claude Williams (16.2) Claude Williams (8.1)
North Carolina Central 28-6 2013-14 Jeremy Ingram (20.8) Jay Copeland (5.8)
UNC Greensboro 23-6 1994-95 Scott Hartzell (15.7) Eric Cuthrell (9.8)
North Carolina State 30-7 1950-51 Sam Ranzino (20.8) Paul Horvath (13.2)
North Carolina State 30-1 1973-74 David Thompson (26) Tom Burleson (12.2)
UNC Wilmington 25-8 2005-06 T.J. Carter (13.6) Beckham Wyrick (5.4)
North Dakota 19-15 2010-11 Troy Huff (13.3) Patrick Mitchell (5.8)
North Dakota State 26-7 2008-09 Ben Woodside (23.2) Brett Winkelman (7.5)
North Dakota State 26-7 2013-14 Taylor Braun (17.6) Taylor Braun (5.5)
Northeastern 27-5 1983-84 Mark Halsel (21) Mark Halsel (9.6)
Northeastern 27-7 1986-87 Reggie Lewis (23.3) Reggie Lewis (7.9)
Northern Arizona 21-7 1996-97 Andrew Mavis (15) Billy Hix (5.4)
Northern Arizona 21-8 1997-98 Andrew Mavis (13.9) Casey Frank (6)
Northern Arizona 21-11 2005-06 Kelly Golob (14.3) Ruben Boykin Jr. (7.2)
Northern Colorado 25-8 2009-10 Will Figures (16.6) Mike Proctor (5.6)
Northern Illinois 25-6 1990-91 Donnell Thomas (17) Donnell Thomas (8.2)
Northern Iowa 30-5 2009-10 Jordan Eglseder (11.9) Jordan Eglseder (7.2)
North Florida 16-16 2011-12 Parker Smith (14.5) Travis Wallace (5.3)
North Florida 16-16 2013-14 Dallas Moore (12.5) Travis Wallace (7.3)
North Texas 24-9 2009-10 Josh White (14.5) George Odufuwa (10.7)
Northwestern 20-14 2009-10 John Shurna (18.2) John Shurna (6.4)
Northwestern 20-14 2010-11 John Shurna (16.6) Luka Mirkovic (5.2)
Northwestern State 26-8 2005-06 Clifton Lee (14.2) Clifton Lee (6.2)
Notre Dame 33-7 1908-09 unavailable unavailable
Oakland 26-9 2009-10 Keith Benson (17.3) Keith Benson (10.5)
Ohio University 29-8 2011-12 D.J. Cooper (14.7) Ivo Baltic (5.0)
Ohio State 35-4 2006-07 Greg Oden (15.7) Greg Oden (9.6)
Oklahoma 35-4 1987-88 Stacey King (22.3) Harvey Grant (9.4)
Oklahoma State 31-2 1945-46 Bob Kurland (19.5) unavailable
Oklahoma State 31-4 2003-04 Tony Allen (16) Ivan McFarlin (6.7)
Old Dominion 28-6 2004-05 Alex Loughton (14.1) Alex Loughton (8.2)
Oral Roberts 27-7 2011-12 Dominique Morrison (19.8) Michael Craion (6.3)
Oregon 30-13 1944-45 Dick Wilkins (12.9) unavailable
Oregon State 29-8 1924-25 unavailable unavailable
Pacific 27-4 2004-05 Guillaume Yango (13.2) Guillaume Yango (7.4)
Penn State 27-11 2008-09 Talor Battle (16.7) Jamelle Cornley (6.3)
Pennsylvania 28-1 1970-71 Bob Morse (15.4) David "Corky" Calhoun (8.6)
Pepperdine 25-5 1985-86 Dwayne Polee (15.7) Anthony Frederick (6.9)
Pepperdine 25-9 1999-00 Brandon Armstrong (14.4) Kelvin Gibbs (7)
Pittsburgh 31-5 2003-04 Carl Krauser (15.4) Chris Taft (7.5)
Pittsburgh 31-5 2008-09 Sam Young (19.2) DeJuan Blair (12.3)
Portland 21-8 1994-95 Canaan Chatman (18.3) Canaan Chatman (6.8)
Portland 21-11 2009-10 Nik Raivio (14.1) Luke Sikma (7.5)
Portland State 23-10 2007-08 Jeremiah Dominquez (14.2) Deonte Huff (6)
Portland State 23-10 2008-09 Jeremiah Dominquez (12.9) Jamie Jones (5.3)
Prairie View 17-12 2002-03 Gregory Burks (18.1) Roderick Riley (7)
Presbyterian 14-15 2011-12 Allonzo Coleman (16.9) Allonzo Coleman (8.8)
Princeton 27-2 1997-98 Gabe Lewullis (14.2) Gabe Lewullis (5.3)
Providence 28-4 1973-74 Marvin Barnes (22.1) Marvin Barnes (18.7)
Purdue 29-4 1987-88 Troy Lewis (17.9) Todd Mitchell (5.8)
Purdue 29-5 1993-94 Glenn Robinson Jr. (30.3) Glenn Robinson Jr. (10.1)
Purdue 29-6 2009-10 E'Twaun Moore (16.4) JaJuan Johnson (7.1)
Quinnipiac 23-10 2009-10 James Feldeine (16.5) Justin Rutty (10.9)
Radford 22-7 1990-91 Doug Day (20.2) Tyrone Travis (6.6)
Radford 22-13 2013-14 Javonte Green (16.9) Javonte Green (8.1)
Rhode Island 28-7 1987-88 Carlton "Silk" Owens (21.8) Kenny Green (7.3)
Rice 25-4 1939-40 Bob Kinney (12.5) unavailable
Richmond 29-8 2010-11 Justin Harper (17.9) Justin Harper (6.9)
Rider 23-11 2007-08 Jason Thompson (20.4) Jason Thompson (12.1)
Rider 23-11 2010-11 Justin Robinson (15.2) Danny Stewart (7.1)
Robert Morris 26-8 2007-08 Jeremy Chappell (14.9) Tony Lee (6.6)
Robert Morris 26-11 2011-12 Velton Jones (16) Lucky Jones (6.1)
Rutgers 31-2 1975-76 Phil Sellers (19.2) Phil Sellers (10.2)
Sacred Heart 18-14 2006-07 Jarrid Frye (13.3) Brice Brooks (6)
Sacred Heart 18-14 2007-08 Brice Brooks (12.8) Drew Shubik (5.8)
St. Bonaventure 25-3 1969-70 Bob Lanier (29.1) Bob Lanier (16)
St. Francis (N.Y.) 23-5 1953-54 Hank Daubenschmidt (20.2) Hank Daubenschmidt (13.4)
Saint Francis (Pa.) 24-8 1990-91 Mike Iuzzolino (24.1) Joe Anderson (6.3)
St. John's 31-4 1984-85 Chris Mullin (19.8) Walter Berry (8.7)
St. John's 31-5 1985-86 Walter Berry (23) Walter Berry (11.1)
Saint Joseph's 30-2 2003-04 Jameer Nelson (20.6) Dwayne Jones (7)
Saint Louis 28-7 2012-13 Dwayne Evans (14) Dwayne Evans (7.7)
Saint Mary's 28-7 2008-09 Patrick Mills (18.4) Diamon Simpson (10.8)
Saint Mary's 28-6 2009-10 Omar Samhan (21.3) Omar Samhan (10.9)
Saint Mary's 28-7 2012-13 Matthew Dellavedova (15.8) Brad Waldow (6)
Saint Peter's 24-4 1967-68 Elnardo Webster (25) Pete O'Dea (14.6)
Saint Peter's 24-7 1990-91 Tony Walker (19.2) Tony Walker (7)
Samford 24-6 1998-99 Reed Rawlings (16.5) Marc Salyers (5.4)
Sam Houston State 25-8 2009-10 Gilberto Clavell (17.1) Gilberto Clavell (6.4)
San Diego 24-6 1986-87 Scott Thompson (15.9) Scott Thompson (7.4)
San Diego State 34-3 2010-11 Kawhi Leonard (15.5) Kawhi Leonard (10.6)
San Francisco 29-0 1955-56 Bill Russell (20.5) Bill Russell (21)
San Jose State 21-9 1980-81 Sid Williams (15.1) Sid Williams (7.2)
Santa Clara 27-2 1968-69 Dennis Awtrey (21.3) Dennis Awtrey (13.3)
Savannah State 21-12 2011-12 Rashad Hassan (13) Arnold Louis (7.8)
Seattle 26-2 1953-54 Joe Pehanick (20.5) Joe Pehanick (10)
Seton Hall 31-2 1952-53 Walter Dukes (26.1) Walter Dukes (22.2)
Seton Hall 31-7 1988-89 John Morton (17.3) Ramon Ramos (7.6)
Siena 27-8 2008-09 Edwin Ubiles (15) Ryan Rossiter (7.9)
Siena 27-7 2009-10 Alex Franklin (16.1) Ryan Rossiter (11.1)
South Alabama 26-7 2007-08 Demetric Bennett (19.7) DeAndre Coleman (7.8)
South Carolina 25-3 1969-70 John Roche (22.3) Tom Owens (14)
South Carolina State 25-8 1988-89 Rodney Mack (15.2) Rodney Mack (11.1)
South Carolina Upstate 21-13 2011-12 Torrey Craig (16.4) Torrey Craig (7.7)
South Dakota 22-7 2007-08 Dylan Grimsley (14.8) Tyler Cain (8.1)
South Dakota 22-10 2009-10 Tyler Cain (14.7) Tyler Cain (10.4)
South Dakota State 27-8 2011-12 Nate Wolters (21.2) Nate Wolters (5.1)
Southeastern Louisiana 24-9 2004-05 Ricky Woods (17.2) Nate Lofton (7.2)
Southeast Missouri State 24-7 1999-00 Roderick Johnson (14.1) Roderick Johnson (8.6)
Southern (La.) 25-6 1989-90 Joe Faulkner (21.7) Joe Faulkner (9.2)
Southern California 24-2 1970-71 Dennis Layton (17.6) Ron Riley (15.3)
Southern California 24-5 1973-74 Gus Williams (15.5) John Lambert (6.9)
Southern California 24-6 1991-92 Harold Miner (26.3) Yamen Sanders (8)
Southern California 24-10 2000-01 Sam Clancy (17.3) Sam Clancy (7.5)
Southern Illinois 29-7 2006-07 Jamaal Tatum (15.2) Randal Falker (7.7)
Southern Methodist 28-7 1987-88 Kato Armstrong (16.1) Terry Thomas (7.9)
Southern Mississippi 29-7 2013-14 Michael Craig (11.1) Michael Craig (7.5)
Southern Utah 25-6 2000-01 Fred House (17.8) Dan Beus (7.9)
South Florida 22-10 1982-83 Charlie Bradley (28.2) Jim Grandholm (9.2)
Stanford 30-5 1997-98 Arthur Lee (14.5) Mark Madsen (8.2)
Stanford 30-2 2003-04 Josh Childress (15.7) Josh Childress (7.5)
Stephen F. Austin State 32-3 2013-14 Desmond Haymon (14.5) Jacob Parker (7.1)
Stetson 22-4 1974-75 Otis Johnson (15.9) Otis Johnson (9)
Stony Brook 25-8 2012-13 Jameel Warney (12.4) Tommy Brenton (8.5)
Syracuse 34-3 2011-12 Kris Joseph (13.4) Fab Melo (5.8)
Temple 32-4 1986-87 Nate Blackwell (19.8) Tim Perry (8.6)
Temple 32-2 1987-88 Mark Macon (20.6) Tim Perry (8)
Tennessee 31-5 2007-08 Chris Lofton (15.5) Tyler Smith (6.7)
Tennessee-Martin 22-10 2008-09 Lester Hudson (27.5) Lester Hudson (7.9)
Tennessee State 19-10 1992-93 Carlos Rogers (20.3) Carlos Rogers (11.7)
Tennessee Tech 27-7 2001-02 Damien Kinloch (16.2) Damien Kinloch (8.5)
Texas 30-7 2005-06 P.J. Tucker (16.1) P.J. Tucker (9.5)
Texas A&M 26-8 1979-80 Vernon Smith (15.1) Rudy Woods (7.6)
Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 26-7 2006-07 Chris Daniels (15.3) Chris Daniels (6.7)
Texas-Arlington 24-9 2011-12 LaMarcus Reed (17.8) Jordan Reves (7.8)
Texas Christian 27-6 1997-98 Lee Nailon (24.9) Dennis Davis (9.8)
Texas-El Paso 28-1 1965-66 Bobby Joe Hill (15) Harry Flournoy (10.7)
Texas-Pan American 22-2 1974-75 Marshall Rogers (26.7) Gilbert King (13.3)
Texas-Pan American 22-4 1977-78 Michael Edwards (24.3) Henry Taylor (14.2)
Texas-San Antonio 22-7 1989-90 Bruce Wheatley (13.9) Bruce Wheatley (9.9)
Texas Southern 22-7 1982-83 Harry Kelly (28.8) Harry Kelly (11.7)
Texas Southern 22-7 1994-95 Kevin Granger (19.7) Anthony Jones (7.4)
Texas State 25-7 1993-94 Lynwood Wade (18.5) Lynwood Wade (8.5)
Texas Tech 30-2 1995-96 Jason Sasser (19.5) Tony Battie (8.9)
Toledo 27-7 2013-14 Julius Brown (14.9) J.D. Weatherspoon (6.6)
Towson 25-11 2013-14 Jerrelle Benimon (18.7) Jerrelle Benimon (11.2)
Troy 26-6 2002-03 Ben Fletcher (13.9) Rob Lewin (8.1)
Tulane 24-4 1948-49 Jim Riffey (13.5) unavailable
Tulsa 32-5 1999-00 David Shelton (13.5) Brandon Kurtz (7)
UAB 25-6 1981-82 Oliver Robinson (21.1) Chris Giles (7.6)
UAB 25-9 2009-10 Elijah Millsap (16.1) Elijah Millsap (9.5)
UCLA 35-4 2007-08 Kevin Love (17.5) Kevin Love (10.6)
UNLV 37-2 1986-87 Armon Gilliam (23.2) Armon Gilliam (9.3)
Utah 30-4 1990-91 Josh Grant (17.5) Josh Grant (8)
Utah State 30-5 2008-09 Gary Wilkinson (17.1) Gary Wilkinson (6.8)
Utah State 30-4 2010-11 Taj Wesley (14.8) Taj Wesley (8)
Utah Valley 22-7 2006-07 Ryan Toolson (15.5) Jordan Brady (5.2)
Valparaiso 26-8 2012-13 Ryan Broekhoff (15.7) Ryan Broekhoff (7.3)
Vanderbilt 28-6 1992-93 Billy McCaffrey (20.6) Bruce Elder (6.1)
Vermont 25-7 2004-05 Taylor Coppenrath (25.1) Taylor Coppenrath (8.9)
Vermont 25-8 2006-07 Mike Trimboli (15.8) Chris Holm (12.2)
Vermont 25-10 2009-10 Marqus Blakely (17.3) Marqus Blakely (9.3)
Villanova 30-8 2008-09 Dante Cunningham (16.1) Dante Cunningham (7.5)
Virginia 30-4 1981-82 Ralph Sampson (15.8) Ralph Sampson (11.4)
Virginia 30-7 2013-14 Malcolm Brogdon (12.7) Akil Mitchell (7)
Virginia Commonwealth 29-7 2011-12 Bradford Burgess (13.5) Juvonte Reddic (6.7)
Virginia Military 26-4 1976-77 Ron Carter (20.4) Dave Montgomery (8.9)
Virginia Tech 25-10 1994-95 Shawn Smith (16) Adrian "Ace" Custis (10.5)
Virginia Tech 25-9 2009-10 Malcolm Delaney (20.2) Jeff Allen (7.4)
Wagner 25-6 2011-12 Latif Rivers (14.6) Jonathon Williams (5)
Wake Forest 27-6 2004-05 Eric Williams (16.1) Eric Williams (7.7)
Washington 30-3 1952-53 Bob Houbregs (25.6) Bob Houbregs (11.5)
Washington State 26-6 1940-41 Paul Lindeman (10.2) unavailable
Washington State 26-9 2007-08 Derrick Low (14.1) Aron Baynes (6)
Weber State 30-7 2012-13 Davion Berry (15.2) Joel Bolomboy (7.1)
Western Carolina 22-12 2009-10 Brandon Giles (11.9) Harouna Mutombo (4.6)
Western Illinois 22-9 2012-13 Terell Parks (12.7) Terell Parks (9.6)
Western Kentucky 30-3 1937-38 Harry Saddler (11.8) unavailable
Western Michigan 26-5 2003-04 Mike Williams (18.9) Anthony Kann (7.2)
West Virginia 31-7 2009-10 Da'Sean Butler (17.2) Devin Ebanks (8.1)
Wichita State 35-1 2013-14 Cleanthony Early (16.4) Cleanthony Early (5.9)
William & Mary 24-10 1948-49 Chester "Chet" Giermak (21.8) unavailable
Winthrop 29-5 2006-07 Michael Jenkins (14.8) Craig Bradshaw (6.3)
Wisconsin 31-5 2007-08 Brian Butch (12.4) Brian Butch (6.6)
Wofford 26-9 2009-10 Noah Dahlman (16.6) Tim Johnson (7.9)
Wright State 23-10 2006-07 DaShaun Wood (19.6) Drew Burleson (5.8)
Wright State 23-13 2012-13 Cole Darling (11.3) Cole Darling (4.6)
Wyoming 31-2 1942-43 Milo Komenich (16.7) unavailable
Xavier 30-7 2007-08 Josh Duncan (12.4) Derrick Brown (6.5)
Yale 29-7-1 1906-07 unavailable unavailable
Youngstown State 20-9 1997-98 Anthony Hunt (14.4) David Brown (7.3)

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Headlines in July MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only four percent of active MLB players earned college diplomas.

Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a July calendar involving such versatile athletes:

JULY
1 - Chicago Cubs rookie 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) belted two homers against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1965. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915) collected four hits against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1919. . . . In 1943, Chicago White Sox OF Guy Curtright (two-time All-MIAA basketball selection led Northeast Missouri State in scoring each of his four seasons in early 1930s) set a MLB rookie record (subsequently broken) with a 26-game hitting streak as a 30-year-old newcomer in his only season as a regular. . . . Boston Red Sox C Gene Desautels (Holy Cross letterman in 1929 and 1930) contributed three hits and four runs against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1938. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) walked five times in a 19-inning, 4-3 victory over the St. Louis Browns in 1952. . . . C-OF Joe Ferguson (member of Pacific's 1967 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Houston Astros with cash to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1978. . . . Cleveland Indians LF "Sweet" Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52) whacked back-to-back homers against the Minnesota Twins in 1968. . . . Washington Senators CF Irv Noren (player of the year for California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) collected a homer and two doubles but his output wasn't enough to prevent a 1951 doubleheader loss against the Philadelphia Athletics. . . . P Elmer Ponder (Oklahoma letterman in 1914 and 1916) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Chicago Cubs in 1921. . . . St. Louis Cardinals rookie C Dave Ricketts (three-year starter led Duquesne in scoring senior season with 17.9 ppg in 1956-57) contributed a career-high three hits against the New York Mets in 1967. . . . P Paul Splittorff (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Morningside, IA, in 1967-68) retired in 1984. His 166 victories in 13 seasons are the most in Kansas City Royals history.
2 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) homered in his fourth consecutive contest in 1955. . . . Detroit Tigers rookie 1B Dale Alexander (starting center in mid-1920s for Milligan TN) collected two homers and six RBI in a 10-4 win against the St. Louis Browns in 1929. . . . St. Louis Browns rookie RF Red Badgro (first-five pick on All-Pacific Coast Conference team in 1926-27 as USC's MVP) went hitless for the only time in an 18-game game span from mid-June to mid-July in 1929. . . . INF Jack Barry (letterman for Holy Cross in 1908) purchased from the Philadelphia Athletics by the Boston Red Sox in 1915. . . . OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) signed as a free agent with the Cleveland Indians in 1947. . . . OF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58), OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58) and teammate Ken McMullen hit back-to-back-to-back homers in the sixth inning to power the Washington Senators to a 10-4 victory over the New York Yankees in 1966. . . . Detroit Tigers P Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) had his no-hit bid ended in the ninth inning in a 5-0 triumph against the New York Yankees in 1970. Fifteen years later, he posted his 200th career victory when the Houston Astros edged the San Diego Padres. . . . New York Giants P Roy Parmelee (letterman for Eastern Michigan in 1924-25 and 1925-26) tossed a 1-0 shutout to beat the St. Louis Cardinals' Dizzy Dean in the nightcap of a 1933 doubleheader. Teammate Carl Hubbell hurled an 18-inning whitewash for the Giants in the opener. . . . In 1983, OF Gary Redus (J.C. player for Athens, AL, and father of Centenary/South Alabama performer) ripped a leadoff homer for the second consecutive game against the Atlanta Braves. . . . Chicago White Sox C Leo Tankersley (TCU letterman in 1922-23 and 1923-24) appeared in his lone MLB game (against the St. Louis Browns in 1925).
3 - In 1960, P Ray Blemker (two-time All-SEC second-team guard led Georgia Tech in scoring each season from 1956-57 through 1958-59) made his lone MLB appearance with the Kansas City Athletics. . . . Kansas City Athletics LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) hit a grand slam before P Herb Score settled down and fanned 14 in the Cleveland Indians' 8-4 triumph in 1959. . . . In 1994, the Cleveland Indians retired the uniform number of OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist). Doby broke the A.L. color barrier in 1947. . . . California Angels P Dave Frost (averaged 10.5 ppg and 4 rpg for Stanford from 1971-72 through 1973-74) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Oakland Athletics in 1979. . . . Cincinnati Reds 1B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) went 4-for-4 in a 4-2 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1932. . . . P Roger Mason (multiple-year letterman for Saginaw Valley State, MI, in late 1970s) traded by the San Diego Padres to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1993. . . . In 1956, Pittsburgh Pirates 2B Johnny O'Brien (two-time All-American with Seattle was first college player to crack 1,000-point plateau in a season when he scored 1,051 in 37 games in 1951-52) became the last N.L. position player in the 20th Century to earn a victory on the mound. . . . Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) contributed five RBI against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1928. The next day, Stephenson supplied five hits against the Cards in the nightcap of a doubleheader.
4 - Cleveland Indians 2B Bosey Berger (Maryland's first All-American led Southern Conference in scoring in league play in 1930-31) had four hits against the Detroit Tigers in the opener of a 1935 doubleheader. . . . 1B-OF Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Buena Vista, IA, in 1966-67) hurled the final 1 1/3 innings for the Chicago Cubs in the opener of a 1977 doubleheader against the Montreal Expos. . . . In 1957, Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high schooler named state's "Mr. Basketball") went 5-for-5, driving in six runs, but it wasn't enough to prevent a 10-7 loss against his original team (the Milwaukee Braves). . . . New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) hit a homer in each end of a 1950 doubleheader split with the Brooklyn Dodgers. . . . St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) went 5-for-7 and scored five runs in a 1928 twinbill split against the Chicago Cubs. . . . Washington Senators P Joe Engel (played for Mount St. Mary's in 1910-11 and 1911-12) hurled a complete game but lost, 1-0, against the Boston Red Sox on an unearned run in the opener of a 1914 doubleheader. . . . Chicago Cubs P Darcy Fast (all-conference player for Warner Pacific OR in 1965-66 and 1966-67) lost his lone MLB decision (7-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies in the nightcap of a 1968 twinbill). . . . P Bob Garibaldi (starting forward for Santa Clara in 1961-62 when he averaged 10.6 ppg and 5.6 rpg) signed with the San Francisco Giants for a $150,000 bonus in 1962 after being named College World Series Most Outstanding Player. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Jay Hook (Northwestern's third-leading scorer as sophomore in 1955-56) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1960. . . . Cleveland Indians P Dutch Levsen (Iowa State letterman in 1918-19) tossed a two-hit shutout against the Chicago White Sox in the opener of a 1927 doubleheader. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) clobbered three homers against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1939 twin bill. . . . Chicago White Sox 1B Tony Lupien (Harvard captain in 1938-39) went 7-for-10 in a 1948 doubleheader split against the Detroit Tigers. . . . Cleveland Indians rookie CF Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26), raising his batting average to .378, had four hits against the Detroit Tigers in the opener of a 1928 twinbill. . . . Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) stole three bases against the California Angels in 1973. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) collected two homers, a triple and five RBI in a 13-10 victory over the California Angels in 1968. . . . Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) and Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) are the winning pitchers as the Brooklyn Dodgers sweep a 1951 doubleheader against the New York Giants. . . . Jeff Shaw (freshman guard for 31-5 Rio Grande, OH, team participating in 1985 NAIA Tournament) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1968. He became the first pitcher in MLB history to lead two different clubs in saves in the same season (23 with the Reds and 25 with the Dodgers). . . . Boston Red Sox 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama letterman in 1936-37) socked four homers in a 1939 doubleheader against the Philadelphia Athletics, collecting 19 total bases and 11 RBI. Three of his round-trippers came in the nightcap, including a record-tying two grand slams in back-to-back innings. . . . New York Yankees P Ed Wells (multi-sport athlete graduated in 1924 from Bethany WV) incurred his lone defeat in the midst of 10 victories from the end of May to early August in 1930. . . . Boston Braves LF Ab Wright (Oklahoma A&M letterman in 1928-29) went hitless for the only time in a 14-game span in 1944.
5 - California Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) homered in his third consecutive contest in 1966. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) became the first African-American player in the A.L., striking out as a pinch-hitter against the Chicago White Sox in 1947. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) tied a N.L. record with 16 chances in a 6-4 win over the Cincinnati Reds in 1930. . . . Cleveland Indians P Oral Hildebrand (Butler All-All-American in 1928-29 and 1929-30) hurled a shutout against the Chicago White Sox for one of his five victories this month in 1934. . . . Detroit Tigers SS Harvey Kuenn (played five games for Wisconsin in 1951-52) provided the game's only tally with an 11th-inning homer against the Cleveland Indians in the nightcap of a 1954 twinbill. . . . Philadelphia Athletics P Pete Naktenis (Duke letterman in 1934-35), yielding 10 earned runs in first 1 2/3 innings, lost his lone MLB decision (16-2 rout by the Boston Red Sox in the opener of a 1936 doubleheader). . . . New York Yankees CF Irv Noren (player of the year For California junior college state champion Pasadena City in 1945) collected a pair of homers and five RBI against the Philadelphia Athletics in the nightcap of a 1954 doubleheader. . . . New York Yankees P Cecil Perkins (All-WVIAC selection in 1961-62 with Salem International WV) lost his lone MLB decision and start (against the Minnesota Twins in 1967). . . . In 1953, Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) blanked the Pittsburgh Pirates, 2-0, for his 28th consecutive complete game. . . . In 1969, Montreal Expos 2B Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) had four hits against his original team (the Philadelphia Phillies). . . . Cincinnati Reds CF Evar Swanson (played all five positions for Knox IL) had four hits against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1930. . . . In 1998, Tampa Bay Devil Rays LF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) became the 3,000th career strikeout victim of Roger Clemens.
6 - San Diego Padres P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) fanned the side against the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2008, triggering a streak of 12 consecutive relief appearances without yielding a run. . . . Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) collected five RBI against the Chicago Cubs in 1954. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State, NC, backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) improved his record to 11-1 with three scoreless innings of relief in a 20-inning, 5-4 victory over the Chicago Cubs in 1980. . . . Seattle Mariners DH Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70 when averaging 7.4 ppg and 4 rpg) banged out four hits in a 5-3 win against the Kansas City Royals in 1980. . . . Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) led off the 1942 All-Star Game with a homer to help the A.L. defeat the N.L., 3-1. . . . Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) went 5-for-9 and scored six runs in a 1945 doubleheader sweep of the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) contributed five hits and two walks at Philadelphia to help the St. Louis Cardinals snap an 11-game losing streak with a 28-6 triumph over the Phillies in the nightcap of a 1929 doubleheader. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) supplied a homer in 1933 All-Star Game. . . . Brooklyn Robins 3B Wally Gilbert (captain played for Valparaiso from 1918-19 through 1920-21) went 4-for-4 in a 10-4 win against the Boston Braves in 1930. . . . California Angels P Ed Halicki (NAIA All-American third-team choice in 1971-72 when he led Monmouth in scoring with 21 ppg after setting a school single-game rebounding record with 40 the previous season) hurled a two-hit shutout against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1980 (infield single in first inning and bloop double in ninth). . . . San Francisco Giants P Atlee Hammaker (averaged 5.3 ppg as freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 as sophomore in 1977-78 under ETSU coach Sonny Smith) yielded seven earned runs to A.L. in 2/3 of an inning in the third frame of 1983 All-Star Game. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) had four hits against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1940 doubleheader. . . . Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) replaced John McNamara as Cleveland Indians manager in 1991. . . . St. Louis Cardinals rookie P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) tossed his first MLB shutout (three-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds in opener of 1947 twinbill). . . . Toronto Blue Jays DH Tony Johnson (All-VSAC selection in 1976-77 and 1979-80 for LeMoyne-Owen TN) had his second 2-for-3 performance in three days in 1982. . . . In his first MLB start, Brooklyn Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) toiled 4 1/3 innings against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1955, striking out four batters while yielding three hits and eight walks. . . . Chicago Cubs P Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps MS in late 1920s and early 1930s) fired two innings of scoreless relief for the N.L. in 1942 All-Star Game. . . . New York Yankees RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) went 3-for-3 as the A.L. smothered the N.L., 13-3, in the 1983 All-Star Game. . . . Boston Braves 3B Chuck Workman (two-time All-MIAA first-five selection was leading scorer when Central Missouri won inaugural NAIA Tournament in 1937) had four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the nightcap of a 1945 twinbill.
7 - P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) awarded on waivers from the New York Mets to the Cleveland Indians in 2006. . . . St. Louis Browns C Benny Bengough (Niagara letterman from 1916-17 through 1918-19) had four hits in an 8-2 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1932. . . . Detroit Tigers OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) went 5-for-5 and scored five runs in a 13-3 victory over the Cleveland Indians in 1951. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Doc Lavan (played for Hope MI from 1908 through 1910) went 4-for-4 against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1922. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates 2B Johnny O'Brien (consensus All-American second-team choice as junior and first-team selection as senior averaged 25.8 ppg for Seattle from 1950-51 through 1952-53) went 4-for-4 in a 4-3 setback against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955. . . . Philadelphia Phillies OF Gary Redus (J.C. player for Athens, AL, and father of Centenary/South Alabama hoopster) ripped two homers in a 7-3 triumph over the Atlanta Braves in 1986. . . . P Preacher Roe (played for Harding, AR, in late 1930s) hit the lone homer in his Organized Baseball career (against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1953) as the Brooklyn Dodgers established a N.L. record by homering in 21 consecutive contests. . . . New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (played briefly with Dartmouth in 1927-28 and 1929-30) ripped a two-run triple off Hall of Fame P Carl Hubbell of the New York Giants in the 1937 All-Star Game. . . . Milwaukee Brewers LF Ted Savage (led Lincoln MO in scoring average in 1955-56) smacked a game-winning, pinch-hit homer off Chicago White Sox P Wilbur Wood in the bottom of the 12th inning in 1970. . . . Cleveland Indians 2B Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) collected three doubles and five RBI in a 27-3 rout of the Boston Red Sox in the opener of a 1923 doubleheader. . . . P Tom Zachary (Guilford, NC, letterman in 1916) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the Washington Senators in 1927.
8 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) whacked two homers against the Chicago Cubs in 1956, igniting a streak of five straight outings with a round-tripper. . . . St. Louis Cardinals C Ferrell Anderson (Kansas letterman in 1936-37 and 1937-38) had three hits in a 7-3 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1953. . . . Chicago Cubs CF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) had four hits against the Milwaukee Braves in 1953. . . . Seattle Mariners P Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Baltimore Orioles in 1983. . . . Kansas City Athletics LF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska all-time scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing career) singled off Hall of Famer Warren Spahn in the opening inning for the A.L. in a 4-3 win against the N.L. in the 1958 All-Star Game. . . . Boston Braves SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) carried off the field on a stretcher after being knocked unconscious by a thrown ball in 1949. . . . California Angels P Dave Frost (averaged 10.5 ppg and 4 rpg for Stanford from 1971-72 through 1973-74) fired a five-hit shutout against the Seattle Mariners in 1978. . . . OF Monte Irvin (played basketball for Lincoln, PA, 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) hit a three-run double in the first inning and grand slam in the 11th to carry the New York Giants to a 10-7 triumph over the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1953. Starting P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) failed in a bid to win his 13th straight against the Bucs. . . . Boston Red Sox 1B Tony Lupien (Harvard captain in 1938-39) went 4-for-4 against the St. Louis Browns in 1943. . . . 1B Cotton Nash (three-time All-American averaged 22.7 ppg and 12.3 rpg in Kentucky career from 1961-62 through 1963-64) returned by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Chicago White Sox after trade three months earlier was voided. . . . Chicago Cubs P Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps MS in late 1920s and early 1930s) yielded a three-run homer to Hall of Fame Boston Red Sox OF Ted Williams as the A.L. notched a dramatic 7-5 victory in the 1941 All-Star Game. . . . 1B Jack Phillips (leading scorer for Clarkson NY in 1942-43) pounded a pinch-hit grand-slam homer in the bottom of the ninth inning to propel the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 7-6 triumph against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1950. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1912 and 1914) won the 16-inning nightcap of a 1924 twinbill, 2-1, at Cincinnati. It triggered a streak of 31 straight scoreless innings for Rixey. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 2B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) ripped a homer for the N.L. in the 1952 All-Star Game. . . . Seattle Pilots P Garry Roggenburk (Dayton's leading scorer three straight seasons from 1959-60 through 1961-62 grabbed school-record 32 rebounds in third varsity contest) hurled his lone MLB complete game (3-1 win against the California Angels in 1969). . . . New York Giants P Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence NY in early 1930s) fanned five A.L. batters, including all-time standouts Jimmie Foxx, Joe Cronin and Al Simmons, in four innings of relief for the N.L. in the 1935 All-Star Game. . . . New York Giants C Wes Westrum (played for Bemidji State, MN, one season before serving in military during WWII) and teammate Daryl Spencer twice hit back-to-back homers in an 11-1 victory against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1956.
9 - Detroit Tigers P Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first-five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Chicago White Sox. The whitewash was one of four complete-game wins for Auker during the month in 1938. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates LF Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) had four hits in a 12-3 win against the New York Giants in the opener of a 1925 doubleheader. . . . Cleveland Indians SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) went 2-for-2 in the 1941 All-Star Game. . . . California Angels OF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1960 NCAA playoff team) tied a MLB record in 1971 by fanning six times against the Oakland A's in the longest shutout in A.L. history (1-0 in 20 innings). . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman basketball team) relieved in the third inning and hurled 11 scoreless frames en route to a 4-3 win against the Milwaukee Braves in 1959. . . . Philadelphia Athletics RF Walt French (letterman for Rutgers and Army) had four hits against the Chicago White Sox in 1926. . . . INF Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of his last three seasons with Lebanon Valley, PA, in late 1920s) awarded on waivers from the Cincinnati Reds to the Detroit Tigers in 1937. . . . SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among the nation's top five scorers each season) was part of the St. Louis Cardinals' entire N.L. starting infield in the 1963 All-Star Game, including 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s), 2B Julian Javier and 3B Ken Boyer. . . . New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) hit two homers at the Polo Grounds in a 10-2 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955. . . . Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) tied a MLB record with seven strikeouts in a doubleheader split with the Boston Red Sox in 1965. . . . New York Yankees RF Charlie Keller (Maryland three-year letterman from 1934-35 through 1936-37) opened the scoring with a two-run homer off Chicago Cubs P Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps MS in late 1920s and early 1930s) in the first inning as the A.L. blitzed the N.L., 12-0, in the 1946 All-Star Game. . . . Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) contributed two hits and two stolen bases for the A.L. in the 1996 All-Star Game. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) blanked the Philadelphia Athletics, 7-0, in the opener of a 1932 twinbill, snapping Hall of Famer Lefty Grove's 11-game winning streak. . . . OF-1B Len Matuszek (starter for Toledo's 18-7 team in 1975-76) traded by the Toronto Blue Jays to the Los Angeles Dodgers for OF Al Oliver in 1985. . . . OF Lyle Mouton (starter in LSU's backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson for 1989 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Cleveland Indians in 2003. . . . Atlanta Braves P Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) got the first two outs in the ninth inning, including whiffing Baltimore Orioles 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62), to help the N.L. blank the A.L., 1-0, in the 1968 All-Star Game. . . . New York Yankees rookie P Steve Roser (Clarkson NY center before bypassing senior season after signing professional baseball contract in 1940) registered the lone complete game of his MLB career (8-2 win against the Detroit Tigers in the nightcap of a 1944 doubleheader). . . . P Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) traded by the San Diego Padres to the New York Yankees for P Ed Whitson in 1986. . . . Tampa Bay Devil Rays RF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) stroked a double for the A.L. off Los Angeles Dodgers P Eric Gagne in the 2002 All-Star Game.
10 - Chicago White Sox 2B Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's top three scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) stroked four hits against the Boston Red Sox in the nightcap of a 1966 doubleheader. . . . P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44), hampered by an off-season pelvic injury, awarded on waivers from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the Detroit Tigers in 1953. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) scored three runs, one on a homer off Lefty Gomez, in the 1934 All-Star Game. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates 2B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) had a 17-game hitting streak snapped by the Chicago Cubs in 1937. . . . P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) awarded on waivers from the St. Louis Cardinals to the New York Giants in 1950. Hearn goes on to lead the N.L. in shutouts (five) and ERA (2.49). . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) hammered a two-run homer in 1951 All-Star Game. . . . OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when he averaged 12.4 ppg) purchased from the Kansas City Royals by the Montreal Expos in 1973. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played basketball for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) extended his streak of consecutive innings without a free pass to 52 but had his nine-game winning streak end with a 3-2 setback against the Chicago Cubs in 1913. . . . In 1970, Cincinnati Reds SS Woodie Woodward went yard off Atlanta Braves P Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) for Woodward's only homer in a nine-year N.L. career (684 of 880 games/1,672 of 2,187 at-bats). . . . New York Giants P Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence, NY, in early 1930s), supported by three hits from OF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931), won his 11th straight game with a 10-3 verdict over the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1935. . . . Cincinnati Reds 2B Johnny Temple (played briefly for Catawba NC in 1945 before joining U.S. Navy) drove in the contest's first run as the N.L. took the lead for good in a 7-3 decision over the A.L. in the 1956 All-Star Game. . . . New York Yankees P Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg from 1995-96 through 1997-98 with Grand Valley State MI) had his streak of 19 straight relief appearances without yielding an earned run come to a halt against the Cleveland Indians in 2014. . . . San Diego Padres P Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection for Princeton in 1999-00) incurred the loss for the N.L. in the 2007 All-Star Game. He yielded the first inside-the-park homer in All-Star Game history (Ichiro Suzuki in fifth inning).
11 - 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) provided two hits for the N.L. in the first 1960 All-Star Game. Two days later in the second All-Star Game, Adcock singled and scored when Milwaukee Braves teammate Eddie Mathews homered in the second inning for the N.L.'s first two runs en route to a 6-0 win against the A.L. . . . Chicago Cubs OF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) slugged an eight-inning, pinch-hit homer for the N.L. in the first of two All-Star Games in 1961. . . . In the midst of a career-high 18-game hitting streak, Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg in 1950-51 with Spring Hill AL) went 4-for-4 against the Boston Red Sox in 1957. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) and New York OF Mickey Mantle each propel blasts in the 500-foot range to the RF upper deck at Yankee Stadium in 1953. . . . Boston Red Sox 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points in season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) smacked a triple off Brooklyn Dodgers P Don Newcombe in the 1950 All-Star Game. . . . In 1948, Detroit Tigers CF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) notched eight straight multiple-hit games with at least one RB in each contest. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) tossed two innings of scoreless relief for the N.L. in the 1967 All-Star Game. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Jim Konstanty (Syracuse player in late 1930s) fanned two of the three batters he faced in putting the A.L. down 1-2-3 in the bottom of the sixth inning of the 1950 All-Star Game. Phillies teammate Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) was the starting pitcher for the N.L. . . . Chicago Cubs P Cal Koonce (standout for Campbell in 1960 and 1961 when the North Carolina-based school was a junior college) hurled a six-hit shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in the nightcap of a 1965 doubleheader. . . . Cincinnati Reds C Ernie Krueger (captain for Lake Forest IL) contributed a career-high four hits against the Boston Braves in the opener of a 1925 twinbill. . . . OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58) traded by the New York Yankees to the Washington Senators for 1B Dale Long in 1962. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) batted leadoff in 1973 when driving in eight runs in a 14-2 triumph against the Texas Rangers. . . . Chicago White Sox P Gary Peters (played for Grove City PA in mid-1950s) tossed three perfect innings of relief for the A.L., including fanning all-time N.L. standouts Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda and Dick Allen, in the 1967 All-Star Game. . . . P Ray Rippelmeyer (led Southern Illinois in scoring and rebounding as a sophomore in 1952-53 before transferring and becoming two-time All-MIAA first-team selection by pacing Southeast Missouri State in scoring in 1953-54 and 1954-55) returned by the Washington Senators to the Cincinnati Reds in 1962 (earlier rule 5 draft selection). . . . Chicago White Sox RF Evar Swanson (played all five positions for Knox IL) went 4-for-4 against the Washington Senators to extend his hitting streak to a career-high 16 in a row.
12 - In the 1955 All-Star Game in Milwaukee, Braves P Gene Conley (All-Pacific Coast Conference first-team selection led the North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as a Washington State sophomore) struck out the side in the top of the 12th inning, earning the victory (6-5) when Stan Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals homered in the bottom of the frame. . . . In 1949, Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) and Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) are among the first four black players in an All-Star Game. . . . San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) stroked a two-run double in the third inning and scored the winning tally in the bottom of the 10th in an 8-7 success for the N.L. in the 1994 All-Star Game. . . . In 1905, Chicago's Three Fingered Brown hurled a two-hitter as he notched the first of nine consecutive victories over Hall of Fame New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played basketball for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century). . . . Baltimore Orioles P Ben McDonald (started six times as freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87 under coach Dale Brown) won his sixth straight decision before losing seven in a row in 1996. . . . Cleveland Indians 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) had four hits against the Chicago White Sox in the opener of a 1931 twinbill. . . . Philadelphia Athletics 1B Ossie Orwoll (played for Luther IA in first half of 1920s) collected five hits and scored four runs in 1929 doubleheader sweep of the St. Louis Browns. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding AR in late 1930s) put the A.L. down in order as a N.L. reliever in the ninth inning of the 1949 All-Star Game. Dodgers 2B teammate Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) scored three runs for the N.L. . . . An eighth-inning single by Philadelphia Athletics 1B Dick Siebert (played for Concordia-St. Paul in 1929 and 1930) deprived Cleveland Indians P Bob Feller of a no-hitter in 1940. . . . Cleveland Indians P Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Mizzou in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) tossed two innings of hitless relief for the A.L. in the 1966 All-Star Game. . . . P Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) traded by the Chicago White Sox with cash to the Boston Red Sox in 2013. . . . San Diego Padres OF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as a junior and second-team choice as a senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) notched his first MLB four-hit game and chipped in with four runs scored (against the San Francisco Giants in 2009). . . . New York Yankees RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) doubled and scored the eventual decisive run for the A.L. in a 2-1 verdict over the N.L. in the 1988 All-Star Game. It was Winfield's last of 12 straight All-Star appearances.
13 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) clobbered two homers, one a grand slam, in a 1956 doubleheader sweep of the Brooklyn Dodgers. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year basketball letterman for Allegheny, PA), stretching his hitting streak to 18 games, supplied a decisive single in the 11th inning in a 2-1 victory against the New York Mets in 1968. . . . In 1964, P Carl Bouldin (starting guard and co-captain for Cincinnati's 1961 NCAA champion) traded with 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50) by the Washington Senators to the Chicago White Sox for 1B Joe Cunningham and a player to be designated (P Frank Kreutzer). But Bouldin never pitched for the White Sox. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) started the 1948 All-Star Game for the N.L. but surrendered a second-inning homer to Detroit Tigers CF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) as the A.L. rallied to prevail, 5-2. Seven years later in 1955, Evers was traded by the Baltimore Orioles to the Cleveland Indians. . . . In the 1954 All-Star Game, Milwaukee Braves P Gene Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as Washington State sophomore) yielded a pinch-hit, game-tying homer to Cleveland Indians CF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) in the bottom of the eighth inning for the A.L. before Conley was charged with two more runs for the N.L. and incurred an 11-9 setback. Chicago White Sox P Bob Keegan (Bucknell letterman in 1941-42 and 1942-43) surrendered a two-run, pinch homer by Cincinnati Reds CF Gus Bell in the top of the eighth. . . . St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) contributed four hits in a 12-10 win against the Brooklyn Robins in 1926. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Jake Flowers (member of Washington College's 1923 "Flying Pentagon" squad in Maryland) contributed three extra-base hits and four RBI in a 12-5 win against the Chicago Cubs in 1931. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) earned a save with two innings of scoreless relief for the N.L. in the 1965 All-Star Game. . . . In 1972, Texas Rangers P Rich Hand (averaged 6.2 ppg for Puget Sound WA in 1967-68) hurled a six-hit shutout against his original team (Cleveland Indians). In his next start five days later, he allowed only one run in 10 innings against the Baltimore Orioles. . . . Boston Braves 1B Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) went 5-for-5 against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1939 doubleheader. . . . P Andy Karl (Manhattan letterman from 1933 through 1935), the N.L. leader in appearances (67) and saves (15) in 1945, registered one of his saves in an 11-9 win for the Philadelphia Phillies against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the resumption of a previously-suspended contest. . . . In 1962, Chicago Cubs rookie P Cal Koonce (standout for Campbell in 1960 and 1961 when the North Carolina-based school was a junior college) hurled a one-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds to give him eight victories in his first 10 decisions. . . . In 1974, California Angels LF Joe Lahoud (New Haven CT letterman in mid-1960s) went 4-for-4, including three extra-base hits, against his original team (Boston Red Sox). . . . In first at-bat with the Montreal Expos, OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when he averaged 12.4 ppg) slugged a pinch-hit homer against the Atlanta Braves in the opener of a 1973 doubleheader. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) tossed an 11-hit shutout in a 4-0 verdict against the Cincinnati Reds in 1907. . . . San Diego Padres P Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty, WV, from 1963-64 through 1965-66) outdueled his brother, Phil Niekro of the Atlanta Braves, 1-0, in 1969. . . . Boston Red Sox P Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as a Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) had a no-hitter with one out in the ninth inning against the Oakland A's in 1979 before yielding a safety to Rickey Henderson. . . . In 1955, Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) started fourth All-Star Game for the N.L. in a six-year span. . . . Cleveland Indians rookie 3B Freddy Spurgeon (played for Kalamazoo MI in 1921-22) supplied four hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1925. . . . New York Giants C Wes Westrum (played for Bemidji State, MN, one season before serving in military during WWII) whacked a grand slam against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1951.
14 - Cleveland Indians player-manager Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out five extra-base hits - four doubles and a homer - but it wasn't enough to prevent an 11-10 defeat in the opening game of a 1946 doubleheader against the Boston Red Sox, which got three homers for eight RBI from Hall of Fame OF Ted Williams. . . . Boston Red Sox C Gene Desautels (Holy Cross letterman in 1929 and 1930) went 4-for-4 against the St. Louis Browns in 1937. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) stroked five singles in an 8-2 win over the New York Yankees in 1952. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Jake Flowers (member of Washington College's 1923 "Flying Pentagon" squad in Maryland) went 4-for-4 in a 3-2 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1931. . . . San Diego Padres Of Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) extended his hitting streak to 19 games with three safeties against the San Francisco Giants in 1977, raising his batting average to .402. . . . In a MLB first, Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) was the Detroit Tigers' catcher in 1972 when his brother, Bill, umpired behind the plate. . . . Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) went 2-for-2 to help the N.L. edge the A.L., 5-4, in 12 innings in the 1970 All-Star Game. . . . St. Louis Browns P Ernie Koob (Western Michigan letterman in 1914) hurled a 17-inning shutout in a scoreless tie against the Boston Red Sox in 1916. . . . P Curly Ogden (Swarthmore PA center in 1919, 1920 and 1922) tossed his third shutout in first seven starts with the Washington Senators in 1924. . . . New York Yankees 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50) socked his second pinch-hit grand slam of the 1957 season. . . . Chicago Cubs P Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) earned the victory in the 1987 All-Star Game with three innings of scoreless relief for the N.L. . . . Chicago White Sox P Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) scored upon for the only time in a 16-game span through the end of the month in 2006. . . . OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) walloped two homers for the California Angels in an 8-7 triumph against the Toronto Blue Jays in 1990.
15 - In 1939, a disputed home run down the LF foul line into the upper deck at the Polo Grounds by Cincinnati Reds CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) hastened the advent of foul pole screens. . . . P Bill Crouch (Eastern Michigan captain in 1927-28) hurled the first 10 frames for the St. Louis Cardinals in their 16-inning, 3-2 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1941. . . . Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) went 4-for-4 in a 3-2 triumph against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1946. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) tied a MLB record with 12 consecutive hits before his streak was snapped in the nightcap of a doubleheader against the Washington Senators in 1952. . . . P George Earnshaw (Swarthmore, PA, basketball participant in 1922) traded by the Brooklyn Dodgers to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1936. . . . Chicago Cubs 3B Howard Freigau (played for Ohio Wesleyan) had his 21-game hitting streak snapped by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1925. . . . A line drive by Pittsburgh Pirates RF Roberto Clemente broke the leg of St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57). But Gibson returned from the injury to lead the Cards to the 1967 World Series championship. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Andy Karl (Manhattan letterman from 1933 through 1935) registered the lone complete game in his MLB career in a 3-1 defeat against the Cincinnati Reds in 1945. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) hurled a no-hitter against St. Louis with a 5-0 win in 1901. Twelve years later, he used only 70 pitches to outduel Cincinnati Reds P Three Finger Brown, 4-2, extending Mathewson's streak of innings without issuing a walk to 61. . . . 1B Cotton Nash (three-time All-American averaged 22.7 ppg and 12.3 rpg in Kentucky career from 1961-62 through 1963-64) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Minnesota Twins in 1969. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Jack Ogden (played for Swarthmore PA in 1918) hurled a five-hit shutout against the Boston Braves in 1931. . . . 1B-OF Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State's back-to-back NAIA Tournament titlists in 1952 and 1953) purchased from the San Francisco Giants by the Boston Red Sox in 1967. . . . In 1997, the Montreal Expos announced the retirement of closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77). . . . Minnesota Twins 2B Jim Snyder (Eastern Michigan letterman in 1951-52) jacked his lone MLB homer (against the Washington Senators in 1964). . . . Montreal Expos rookie LF Mike Stenhouse (averaged 4.1 ppg for Harvard in 1977-78) smacked a homer in back-to-back games against the Cincinnati Reds in 1984. . . . C John Stephenson (scored 1,361 points for William Carey MS in early 1960s) hit a pinch-hit, two-run homer in the ninth inning to carry the California Angels to a 4-3 win against the Milwaukee Brewers in 1972. . . . Philadelphia Athletics rookie RF Kite Thomas (averaged 5.1 ppg for Kansas State in 1946-47) supplied a career-high three hits, including a double and homer, in the opener of a 1952 doubleheader against the St. Louis Browns.
16 - Cincinnati Reds rookie LF Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) collected two homers and five RBI against the New York Giants in the nightcap of a 1950 twinbill. Eleven years later as a Milwaukee Braves 1B in 1961, Adcock swatted two homers against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates LF Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) had four hits, including three doubles, against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1927 doubleheader. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year basketball letterman for Allegheny, PA) stretched his hitting streak to 21 games with a decisive 12th-inning double in a 4-3 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1968. Three years later in 1971, Beckert banged out four hits against the Phillies. . . . CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the New York Yankees in 1942 although he never played for the Yanks. . . . St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) tallied four hits against the New York Giants in the midst of four consecutive contests with at least three safeties in 1929. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) delivered two more hits, giving him an A.L. record-tying 15 safeties over a four-game span in 1952. . . . Philadelphia Athletics RF Walt French (letterman for Rutgers and Army) had four hits against the St. Louis Browns in the nightcap of a 1926 doubleheader. . . . After 16 scoreless innings, New York Giants 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) stroked a bases-loaded triple to ignite a 7-0 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1920. . . . San Francisco Giants P Ed Halicki (NAIA All-American third-team choice in 1971-72 when leading Monmouth in scoring with 21 ppg after setting school single-game rebounding record with 40 the previous season) hurled back-to-back shutouts in a six-day span in 1976. . . . Cleveland Indians rookie P Rich Hand (averaged 6.2 ppg for Puget Sound WA in 1967-68) hurled a four-hit shutout against the Kansas City Royals in 1970. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers manager Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) hospitalized in 2000 after experiencing dizziness as a result of an irregular heartbeat. . . . California Angels LF Joe Lahoud (New Haven CT letterman in mid-1960s) launched a pair of two-run homers against the Cleveland Indians in 1974. . . . Chicago Cubs SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers in 1942-43 and 1943-44 for Drury MO) homered in each end of a 1950 twinbill sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . Boston Braves OF Ab Wright (Oklahoma A&M letterman in 1928-29) whacked a three-run, pinch-hit homer against the Brooklyn Dodgers in the nightcap of a 1944 doubleheader.
17 - Cincinnati Reds LF Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) went 4-for-4, scored four runs and threw out a runner at home plate in the ninth inning in a 9-8 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1951 twinbill. Four years later as a Milwaukee Braves 1B in 1955, Adcock pounded two homers in an 8-7 win against the New York Giants in the lidlifter of a doubleheader. . . . Texas Rangers P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) fired a three-hit shutout against the New York Yankees in 1974. . . . Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70 when averaging 7.4 ppg and 4 rpg) contributed a pinch-hit single for the A.L. in front of his hometown fans in the 1979 All-Star Game. . . . 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) traded by the San Diego Padres to the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2008. . . . Legendary Babe Ruth drew his 2,000th career base on balls in 1934 at Cleveland off P Oral Hildebrand (All-American for Butler in 1928-29 and 1929-30). . . . Cleveland Indians OF Chuck Hinton (played multiple sports for Shaw NC) hammered three homers and a triple in a 1966 doubleheader sweep of the Detroit Tigers. . . . Washington Senators LF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) homered in his first MLB game in the opener of a 1962 twinbill against the Chicago White Sox. . . . In 1964, Baltimore Orioles P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) hurled a 5-0 shutout against the Detroit Tigers despite yielding 11 hits. . . . In the midst of four straight complete-game victories, Washington Senators rookie P Dave Stenhouse (three-time All-Yankee Conference selection for Rhode Island from 1952-53 through 1954-55) spun a three-hit shutout against the Chicago White Sox in 1962. . . . In the midst of winning three straight starts in 1971, Atlanta Braves P George Stone (averaged 14.7 ppg and 6.5 rpg for Louisiana Tech in 1964-65 and 1965-66) tossed his second shutout in three weeks. . . . Boston Red Sox 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) became the first A.L. player to hit four consecutive doubles in one game (opener of 1935 doubleheader against the Cleveland Indians). . . . St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s) went 8-for-10 in a 1961 twinbill sweep of the Chicago Cubs.
18 - P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the San Diego Padres in 2006. . . . Philadelphia Phillies LF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) had four hits and four RBI in a 9-8 loss against the Cincinnati Reds in 1934. The next year, he stroked three doubles in an 11-3 defeat against the Chicago Cubs. . . . Cincinnati Reds CF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) went 4-for-4 against the New York Giants in the opener of a 1948 doubleheader. It was Baumholtz's third consecutive contest with at least three safeties. . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) hurled a one-hitter in a 7-0 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1947. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers C-OF Joe Ferguson (member of Pacific's 1967 NCAA playoff team) broke up a no-hit bid by Luke Walker of the Pittsburgh Pirates with a ninth-inning homer in the nightcap of a 1971 twinbill. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) hit two homers but they were in vain in an 8-7 setback against the New York Giants in 1930. . . . All-time hits leader Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds hit the only grand slam of his career with the homer yielded in 1964 by Philadelphia Phillies P Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55). . . . Cincinnati Reds rookie 3B Chuck Harmon (second-leading scorer for Toledo in 1946-47 and 1947-48) had four hits against the New York Giants in the opener of a 1954 doubleheader. . . . OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when he averaged 12.4 ppg) purchased from the Chicago White Sox by the Montreal Expos in 1975. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) blanked the St. Louis Cardinals, 5-0, in the nightcap of a 1913 doubleheader but his record string of 68 walkless innings came to a halt. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Ben McDonald (started six times as freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87 under coach Dale Brown) hurled a two-hit shutout against the Texas Rangers in 1992. . . . OF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) managed the only hit for the Baltimore Orioles against Boston Red Sox P Russ Kemmerer in the opener of a 1954 doubleheader. . . . Boston Red Sox 2B Pinky Pittenger (set Toledo's single-game scoring record with 49 points in 1918-19) went 4-for-4 against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1923 twinbill. . . . After speaking out against racial discrimination testifying in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee, Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) scored twice, once on a steal of home in the sixth inning, in a 3-0 triumph against the Chicago Cubs in 1949. . . . In the midst of a career-high 10-game hitting streak in a one-week span in 1955 (including three twinbills), Philadelphia Phillies SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers in 1942-43 and 1943-44 for Drury MO) smacked a homer for the third time in a four-game stretch. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram, OH, in early 1950s) went 3-for-4 in each end of a twinbill sweep of the Chicago Cubs in 1961. White tied Ty Cobb's 49-year-old record of 14 hits in back-to-back doubleheaders.
19 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) went 4-for-4 with two homers and eight RBI against the New York Giants in 1956. Eight years later with the Los Angeles Angels in 1964, Adcock homered twice in a 4-0 victory against the Minnesota Twins in the nightcap of a twinbill. . . . New York Mets SS Bill Almon (averaged 2.5 ppg in half a season for Brown's 1972-73 team ending school's streak of 12 straight losing records) had four hits and scored four runs in a 13-3 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1980. . . . Washington Senators SS Tim Cullen (starting guard for Santa Clara in 1962-63 when averaging 10 ppg and 3.4 rpg) contributed four hits in a 4-2 victory against the Detroit Tigers in 1967. . . . Boston Braves rookie 2B Jack Dittmer (played for Iowa in 1949-50), entering the game hitting .150, erupted for three safeties and five RBI in a 6-2 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1952. . . . Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (played for Guilford, NC, in mid-1920s) hit a homer off his brother (Wes Ferrell of Cleveland Indians) in 1933. Wes, who whacked a round-tripper in the same inning (fourth), finished his career with 38 HRs in 548 games while Rick had 28 in 1,884 contests. . . . Houston Astros reliever Buddy Harris (Philadelphia Textile letterman in 1965-66 and 1966-67) posted his lone MLB victory (against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1971). . . . Chicago White Sox C Duane Josephson (led Northern Iowa in scoring in 1962-63 and 1963-64 under coach Norm Stewart) went 4-for-4 in a 6-3 win against the Baltimore Orioles in the nightcap of a 1970 doubleheader. . . . P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) started a second straight game for the last-place Los Angeles Dodgers in 1958. He was lifted after walking four batters in the first inning the previous day. . . . Washington Senators CF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) went 4-for-4 with two homers and five RBI against the Boston Red Sox in the opener of a 1964 doubleheader. . . . Chicago White Sox OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) lashed a leadoff homer for the second straight game against the Kansas City Royals in 2002. . . . Washington Senators RF Danny Moeller (Millikin IL captain in 1905-06) stole second, third and home in the opening inning before doubling and tripling later in the game against the Cleveland Indians in 1915. . . . P Gary Peters (played for Grove City, PA, in mid-1950s) whacked a 13th-inning pinch-hit homer to give the Chicago White Sox a 3-2 win against the Kansas City Athletics in 1964. . . . OF Ted Savage (led Lincoln, MO, in scoring average in 1955-56) knocked in the game-winning run in the 11th inning as the Cincinnati Reds overcame a 9-0 deficit to edge the Houston Astros, 10-9, in 1969. . . . New York Giants P Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence, NY, in early 1930s) hurled a 12-hit shutout against the Cincinnati Reds in 1934. . . . New York Yankees 1B-Of Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State's back-to-back NAIA Tournament titlists in 1952 and 1953) notched his second five-hit game of the month in 1958 (against the Kansas City Athletics). . . . New York Yankees 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50) stroked a decisive ninth-inning, bases-loaded double in the ninth inning after previously providing two homers in a 13-11 triumph against the Cleveland Indians in 1960. . . . Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) went 4-for-4 against the New York Giants in 1926. . . . In 1977, San Diego Padres OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) went 2-for-2, including a two-run single off Sparky Lyle, in Winfield's first of 12 consecutive All-Star Game appearances. . . . San Diego Padres P Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection for Princeton in 1999-00) earned his fifth straight victory, surrendering only two hits in seven innings of a 1-0 verdict over the Philadelphia Phillies in 2007.
20 - St. Louis Browns RF Beau Bell (two-year letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) had three hits in both ends of a 1937 doubleheader against the New York Yankees. . . . Boston Red Sox LF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) scored four runs in an 8-7 win against the Cleveland Indians in 1952. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 3B Jake Flowers (member of Washington College's 1923 "Flying Pentagon" squad in Maryland) furnished five hits in a 16-5 romp over the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1932. . . . 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Houston Astros for P Jim Mahoney and cash in 1966. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) had four hits against the Brooklyn Robins in 1930. Two years later, Gelbert collected three safeties, three runs and three RBI against the same opponent to trigger a career-high 12-game hitting streak in 1932. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) provided five hits in a 6-5 win against the Minnesota Twins in 1996. . . . Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) logged three doubles in a 4-3 loss against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1955. . . . P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) traded by the New York Giants to the Cincinnati Reds in 1916. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87) hurled a one-hit shutout against the Kansas City Royals in 1993. . . . Cincinnati Reds rookie LF Evar Swanson (played all five positions for Knox IL) went 6-for-9 in a 1929 doubleheader against the Philadelphia Phillies.
21 - Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) contributed four safeties for the second time during a career-high 27-game hitting streak in 1968. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) tossed a six-hit shutout against the San Francisco Giants in 1978. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers INF-OF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) hit a game-winning, three-run homer in the ninth inning of a 9-8 decision over the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1930 doubleheader. Hendrick's decisive blast was one of four pinch-hit round-trippers during the twinbill (two for each team). . . . Cleveland Indians P Dutch Levsen (Iowa State letterman in 1918-19) hurled the second of back-to-back shutouts in 1926. . . . Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) went 5-for-5 in a 7-4 win against the New York Giants in the nightcap of a 1957 doubleheader. . . . 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as sophomore in 1965-66) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Houston Astros in 1986. . . . In his first MLB start, Baltimore Orioles P Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman forward for LSU in 1986-87) blanked the Chicago White Sox, 2-0, in 1990. . . . In the midst of a 10-game hitting streak, New York Yankees RF Bud Metheny (letterman for William & Mary from 1935-36 through 1937-38) went 4-for-4 against the St. Louis Browns in 1943. Two years later, he homered in a 12-3 romp over the Chicago White Sox in 1945. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates bonus baby rookie SS Eddie O'Brien (third-team All-American selection as Seattle senior in 1952-53 when finishing second in nation in field-goal percentage) went 3-for-4 in the midst of a seven-game hitting streak in 1953. . . . Philadelphia Athletics P Cotton Pippen (Texas Western letterman in 1929-30) posted his second complete-game victory in less than a month in 1939. . . . In 1960, Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) hurled his third career one-hitter.
22 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) homered in both ends of a 1956 doubleheader against the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) chipped in with four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in 1970. . . . St. Louis Browns C Benny Bengough (Niagara letterman from 1916-17 through 1918-19) went 4-for-4 against the Washington Senators in 1931. . . . Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University hoopsler in early 1920s) hit for the cycle against the Washington Senators in 1932. . . . Cincinnati Reds CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) had his 15-game hitting streak snapped by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1939. . . . P Dallas Green (Delaware's runner-up in scoring and rebounding In 1954-55) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the New York Mets in 1966. Green was returned to Philly three weeks later. . . . In 1999, Cleveland Indians manager Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) accidentally handed in an incorrect lineup card against the Toronto Blue Jays, forcing the Tribe to forfeit the DH and bat their pitcher in the seventh spot in the batting order. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Dave Leonhard (averaged 4.8 ppg with Johns Hopkins MD in 1961-62) tossed a five-hit shutout against the Kansas City Royals in 1971. . . . OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Chicago Cubs in 2003. . . . Baltimore Orioles RF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) contributed four RBI in the second of back-to-back games with three hits against the Chicago White Sox in 1987. . . . Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1927, including two of his N.L.-high 46 doubles. Three years later, he raised his 1930 batting average to .391 by extending a career-high hitting streak to 16 in a row.
23 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) contributed four hits against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955. . . . C Mark Bailey (led Southwest Missouri State in rebounding and field-goal shooting in 1980-81) traded by the Houston Astros to the Montreal Expos in 1988. . . . Washington Senators P Whitey Campbell (Alabama forward was letterman from 1927 through 1929) made his lone MLB appearance (one inning with no earned runs against the Detroit Tigers in 1933). . . . OF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on school all-time scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing Nebraska career) and C Elston Howard socked back-to-back pinch-hit homers for the New York Yankees in the ninth inning in 1955 but they still lost to the Kansas City Athletics, 8-7, in 11 frames. . . . Boston Red Sox LF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) supplied three extra-base hits in a 4-3 victory against the Chicago White Sox in 1953. Two years later, Evers' two-run, pinch-hit homer powered the Cleveland Indians to a 3-2 triumph against the Baltimore Orioles, who had traded him earlier in the month. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Johnny Gee (Michigan captain was Big Ten Conference's sixth-leading scorer in 1936-37) yielded only two hits in seven innings of scoreless relief to notch a 3-2 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1943. . . . Utilityman Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) provided a pinch-hit grand slam in the bottom of the 10th inning to give the Chicago Cubs a 9-5 win in the opener of a 1933 doubleheader against the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . Washington Senators LF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) homered for the A.L. off Philadelphia Phillies P Steve Carlton in the 1969 All-Star Game. . . . Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) smacked a triple off Oakland A's P Rollie Fingers in the 1974 All-Star Game. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 2B Barney Koch (Oregon letterman in 1943-44) contributed a career-high three hits in his MLB debut in the opener of a 1944 twinbill. . . . Chicago White Sox RF Danny Moeller (Millikin IL captain in 1905-06) had a 12-game hitting streak snapped by the Detroit Tigers in 1915. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College, MD, in the mid-1930s), after swatting four consecutive homers in two 1944 games (three in the opener of a doubleheader against the New York Giants), received the ultimate compliment. In the nightcap of the twinbill, he is issued an intentional walk forcing in a run. . . . In 1962, Brooklyn Dodgers iNF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) became the first African-American inductee to the Baseball Hall of Fame. . . . Philadelphia Athletics rookie 3B Al Rubeling (played for Towson in early 1930s) went hitless for the only time in a 19-game span in 1940. . . . Cleveland Indians 2B Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) went 4-for-4 against the Boston Red Sox in 1924. Eight years later as a Chicago Cubs LF, Stephenson contributed four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1932.
24 - Philadelphia Phillies LF Morrie Arnovich (played for Wisconsin-Superior in early 1930s) went 4-for-4 and scored four runs in a 13-11 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1937. . . . Philadelphia Athletics P Stan Baumgartner (played on Western Conference champion for University of Chicago in 1914) hurled a shutout against the St. Louis Browns in 1924. . . . New York Yankees Hall of Fame OF Earle Combs (three-year captain for Eastern Kentucky) crashed into the wall in St. Louis in 1934, incurring a broken collarbone and fractured skull. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) smashed a decisive 10th-inning, two-run homer at New York in 1954. The blast was Doby's third round-tripper in two days at Yankee Stadium. . . . Chicago White Sox C Frank Grube (Lafayette starting guard as senior in 1926-27) went 7-for-10 in a 1932 doubleheader against the Cleveland Indians. . . . The lone MLB homer for Doug Howard (second-team All-WAC choice for BYU in 1968-69 and 1969-70) was a pinch-hit circuit clout for the St. Louis Cardinals off Burt Hooton of the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1975. . . . Washington Senators CF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) had back-to-back homers against the Kansas City Athletics in 1965. . . . Chicago White Sox 1B Tony Lupien (Harvard captain in 1938-39) stroked five hits in an 8-4 win against the New York Yankees in the nightcap of a 1948 doubleheader. . . . St. Louis Cardinals RF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) contributed four RBI in a 6-4 triumph against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1929.
25 - Joey Amalfitano (played for Loyola Marymount in 1952-53) became manager for the Chicago Cubs in 1980. . . . In his second MLB start, California Angels 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70 when averaging 7.4 ppg and 4 rpg) banged out four hits against the Kansas City Royals in 1974. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) homered from each side of the plate for the second time in 1999 season in a 9-1 triumph against the Boston Red Sox. . . . Philadelphia Athletics RF Walt French (letterman for Rutgers and Army) had four hits against the Detroit Tigers in 1927. . . . St. Louis Cardinals rookie SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) went 4-for-4 against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1929. . . . OF David Justice (led Thomas More, KY, in assists in 1984-85) jacked a home run to account for the Atlanta Braves' lone hit and game's only run in a 1-0 victory against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1992. . . . Boston Red Sox 1B Tony Lupien (Harvard captain in 1938-39) went 5-for-6, including three extra-base hits, in a 9-8 win against the Louis Browns in 1942. . . . Cleveland Indians rookie 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) supplied five RBI in a 15-5 win against the Boston Red Sox in the nightcap of a 1928 doubleheader. . . . Cleveland Indians 2B Freddy Spurgeon (played for Kalamazoo MI in 1921-22) supplied four hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1926. The next year, he extended his career-high hitting streak to 14 games in a row. . . . Chicago Cubs INF-OF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) contributed four hits in a 9-5 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1930. . . . Cincinnati Reds rookie LF Evar Swanson (played all five positions for Knox IL) went 5-for-6 against the Boston Braves in 1929. . . . Boston Red Sox 3B Jim Tabor (Alabama letterman in 1936-37) hit two homers in a 10-6 verdict over the Cleveland Indians in 1941.
26 - Philadelphia Phillies LF Morrie Arnovich (played for Wisconsin-Superior in early 1930s) went 4-for-4 in a 3-1 setback against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1939. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny, PA) banged out five straight hits in a 7-6 decision over the Atlanta Braves in the nightcap of a 1970 doubleheader. . . . After incurring a 13-3 defeat against the New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox P Gene Conley (All-PCC first-team selection led North Division in scoring in 1949-50 as Washington State sophomore) and teammate Pumpsie Green mysteriously disappeared in 1962. Conley wanted to fly to Israel and went to the airport but was denied a ticket because he didn't have a visa. . . . OF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1960 NCAA playoff team) purchased from the New York Yankees by the California Angels in 1969. . . . Acting St. Louis Cardinals manager Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) contributed four hits but they weren't enough to prevent a 6-5 setback at Boston in the nightcap of a 1930 twinbill against the Braves. . . . New York Giants P Johnny Gee (Michigan captain was Big Ten Conference's sixth-leading scorer in 1936-37) hurled a complete-game, 3-2 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1946. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-Ameican with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) ended an 0-for-19 slump by going 5-for-5 in a 6-4 win against the Boston Braves in 1952. . . . New York Giants LF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) started a fourth-inning triple play with a brilliant catch near the wall in a 5-4 verdict over the Cincinnati Reds in 1936. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) won his 21st consecutive contest from the Cincinnati Reds in 1911. . . . In the midst of a career-high 15-game hitting streak in 1973, Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) supplied multiple safeties for the sixth time in last nine outings. . . . 1B Babe Young (Fordham letterman in 1935-36) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1948.
27 - Brooklyn Dodgers P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman basketball team) hurled one of his four shutouts in 1959. . . . In an 8-0 victory against the Chicago Cubs, San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) secured five hits in a game for the third time in the 1993 campaign. . . . Los Angeles P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) fanned 16 Philadelphia Phillies in 11 innings before the Dodgers prevailed in 16 frames, 2-1, in 1966. . . . Boston Red Sox OF Joe Lahoud (letterman for New Haven, CT) hammered a two-run homer in the top of the 20th inning in a 5-3 win at Seattle in 1969. . . . Washington Senators CF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) launched back-to-back homers and had five RBI in an 8-4 win against the Detroit Tigers in 1963. . . . OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) traded by the Texas Rangers to the Cleveland Indians in 2007. . . . In the ninth inning against the California Angels, New York Yankees SS Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) pulled the hidden-ball trick for the second time in six weeks in 1970. . . . OF Greasy Neale (hoopster graduated from West Virginia Wesleyan College in 1915) supplied three of the Cincinnati Reds' eight stolen bases in a 14-5 triumph against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1918 doubleheader. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) broke his ankle stepping on first base against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1931. . . . Chicago White Sox 2B Frank Whitman (one of leading scorers with Eureka IL as freshman in 1942-43) stroked a single for his lone MLB hit (against the New York Yankees in 1946).
28 - Cincinnati Reds CF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) went 4-for-4 in a 7-5 win against the Brooklyn Robins in the nightcap of a 1929 doubleheader. . . . 1B Donn Clendenon (letterman for Morehouse, GA) set a New York Mets record by knocking in seven runs in a 12-2 rout of the San Francisco Giants in 1970. . . . Detroit Tigers CF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) contributed four hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1948. . . . Kansas City Royals rookie P Rich Gale (led New Hampshire with 7.2 rpg in 1975-76), improving his mark to 12-3, posted his fifth triumph of the month by tossing his third shutout in 1978. . . . Washington Senators rookie OF Gary Holman (USC letterman in 1962-63) had a career-high three hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1968. . . . Toronto Blue Jays P Dave Lemanczyk (averaged 4.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg from 1969-70 through 1971-72 on a couple of NCAA College Division Tournament teams for Hartwick, NY) registered his third shutout in 1979, blanking his former team, the Detroit Tigers, 3-0. . . . OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the San Francisco Giants in 2002. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) tied a MLB record with two doubles in a 10-run second inning en route to a 14-6 decision over the St. Louis Browns in the opener of a 1935 doubleheader. . . . Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played four games with Central Washington in 1967-68) made an unassisted double play against the Kansas City Royals in 1973. . . . Philadelphia Athletics rookie 1B Ossie Orwoll (played for Luther IA in first half of 1920s), raising his batting average to .390, had four hits against the St. Louis Browns in 1928. . . . Philadelphia Athletics rookie SS Ace Parker (Duke letterman in 1935-36) provided a career-high three hits and four RBI in an 11-7 win against the Cleveland Indians in 1937. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) went on a 12-for-25 spurt en route to capturing the 1949 N.L. batting title. . . . Boston Red Sox RF Arlie Tarbert (Ohio State letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) had a career-high two hits in a 3-0 win against the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a 1927 doubleheader.
29 - Chicago White Sox OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) knocked in eight runs in a 1956 doubleheader sweep of the Boston Red Sox. . . . OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) awarded on waivers from the New York Giants to the Detroit Tigers in 1954. . . . Chicago White Sox P Joel Horlen, flirting with a no-hitter entering the ninth inning, wound up losing the game, 2-1, when OF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) socked a homer for the Washington Senators in 1963. LF Chuck Hinton (played multiple sports for Shaw NC) broke up the no-hit bid with a one-out single in the ninth. The next year, Lock knocked in all of the Senators' runs with two homers in a 4-1 win against the Cleveland Indians. . . . OF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) awarded on waivers from the Baltimore Orioles to the Boston Red Sox in 1954. . . . Cleveland Indians 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) went 5-for-5 and chipped in with five RBI in a 14-7 win against the Detroit Tigers in 1929. . . . Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) collected four RBI in an 11-9 victory against the Chicago White Sox in 1974. . . . P Paul Reuschel (Western Illinois' leading rebounder in 1966-67 with 15.2 per game) posted the save when the Cleveland Indians extended their winning streak to seven games with a 9-6 decision over the Chicago White Sox in 1979. . . . In 1963, Minnesota Twins rookie P Garry Roggenburk (Dayton's leading scorer three straight seasons from 1959-60 through 1961-62 grabbed school-record 32 rebounds in third varsity game) didn't allow an earned run in his first eight relief appearances of the month until the Red Sox tallied one earned run 4 2/3 innings against him.
30 - Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) provided four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in the opener of a 1967 twinbill. . . . Texas Rangers P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State, NC, backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) fanned 13 batters while hurling a no-hitter against the first-place Oakland A's in 1973. . . . Texas Rangers 1B Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding in 1966-67 for Buena Vista IA) went 4-for-4 in a 2-1 victory against the Oakland Athletics in the opener of a 1972 doubleheader. . . . Milwaukee Braves 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg in 1950-51 for Spring Hill AL) belted a double off Hank Aguirre for the N.L. in the second 1962 All-Star Game. Pittsburgh Pirates SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) contributed two hits and two RBI for the N.L. and Washington Senators P Dave Stenhouse (three-time All-Yankee Conference selection for Rhode Island from 1952-53 through 1954-55) started for the A.L. . . . 2B Marv Breeding (played for Samford in mid-1950s) traded by the Washington Senators to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1963. . . . Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) fired as manager of the Cleveland Indians in 1971. . . . Detroit Tigers CF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) accumulated three hits and four runs against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1948. . . . In the midst of a career-high 13-game hitting streak, Oakland Athletics 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) whacked two homers in an 11-1 win against the Toronto Blue Jays in 1980. . . . New York Giants OF Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln, PA, 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) tied a N.L. record by grounding into three double plays against the Milwaukee Braves in 1953. . . . In 1991, Seattle Mariners P Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage as freshman en route to averaging 5.1 ppg for Portland from 1975-76 through 1979-80) collected his eighth triumph in nine decisions over a two-month span. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) had his 13-game winning streak snapped by the Pittsburgh Pirates, 3-1, in 1909. . . . Cleveland Indians RF Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) contributed four hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1929. . . . St. Louis Cardinals C Don Padgett (freshman in 1934 with Lenoir-Rhyne NC excelled in multiple sports) had four hits against the Boston Braves in 1940. . . . Chicago White Sox P Gary Peters (played for Grove City, PA, in mid-1950s) faced only 29 batters in a 75-pitch, 6-0 shutout of the New York Yankees in 1966. . . . Chicago Cubs SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers in 1942-43 and 1943-44 for Drury MO) collected five RBI against the New York Giants in 1951. . . . San Diego Padres CF Will Venable (All-Ivy League first-team selection as a junior and second-team choice as a senior averaged 9.3 ppg under Princeton coach John Thompson III from 2001-02 through 2004-05) contributed four safeties against the Cincinnati Reds in 2009. He belted a homer for the first of three consecutive contests. . . . OF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) traded by the Seattle Mariners to the San Francisco Giants in 2005.
31 - P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) traded by the San Diego Padres to the Texas Rangers in 2011. . . . Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) belted four homers off four different pitchers plus a double against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1954, setting a MLB record for most total bases in a game (18) that stood until broken by RF Shawn Green in 2002. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year letterman for Allegheny PA) contributed seven hits against the Cincinnati Reds in a 1970 twinbill sweep. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915) banged out four hits against the New York Giants in the opener of a 1917 doubleheader. . . . St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) collected five hits and scored four runs in an 18-5 pounding of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1928. . . . P Johnny Gee (captain of Michigan's 16-4 team in 1936-37) absorbed his first defeat since returning to the New York Giants in 1946 after a year's retirement. . . . Cleveland Indians 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) scored five runs in a 16-11 victory against the Toronto Blue Jays in 1983. . . . Boston Red Sox rookie P Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection as sophomore in 1956-57 when leading Oklahoma in rebounding) hurled the middle three innings for the A.L., yielding the only run, in a 1-1 tie in the second of two All-Star Games in 1961. St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram OH in early 1950s) of the N.L. and Detroit Tigers RF Al Kaline of the A.L. were the only All-Stars with two safeties. . . . Boston Red Sox P Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Mizzou in 1957-58 as an All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) hurled a one-hitter at California in 1970. . . . Cincinnati Reds 2B Johnny Temple (played briefly in 1945 for Catawba, NC, before joining U.S. Navy) contributed seven hits in a 1955 twinbill sweep of the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . Chicago Cubs OF Cy Williams (Notre Dame forward in 1909-10) clobbered a three-run homer to chase New York Giants Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) in the opener of a 1915 doubleheader.

MLB achievements in June by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in May by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in April by former college basketball players

Better Early Than Never: UK Passes UNC For Most Undergraduate Draftees

Kentucky, after having 16 undergraduates selected in the NBA draft in the last five years under coach John Calipari, surpassed North Carolina for most players in this "defector" category. UK is expected to remain ahead of the Tar Heels in 2015 when the Wildcats should have multiple players leave school early for the sixth straight season to declare for the NBA draft.

It's debatable whether the undergrads should have returned to school for additional seasoning or even attended college in the first place. Syracuse, after having eight undergraduates in the last seven NBA drafts, joined the following list of 14 schools with more than 10 defectors listed chronologically since the introduction of hardship cases in 1971:

Kentucky (24) - Tom Payne (1971), Rex Chapman (1988), Jamal Mashburn (1993), Antoine Walker (1996), Ron Mercer (1997), Nazr Mohammed (1998), Rajon Rondo (2006), Jodie Meeks (2009), Eric Bledsoe (2010), DeMarcus Cousins (2010), Daniel Orton (2010), Patrick Patterson (2010), John Wall (2010), Brandon Knight (2011), DeAndre Liggins (2011), Anthony Davis (2012), Terrence Jones (2012), Michael Kidd-Gilchrist (2012), Doron Lamb (2012), Marquis Teague (2012), Archie Goodwin (2013), Nerlens Noel (2013), Julius Randle (2014), James Young (2014)

North Carolina (23) - Bob McAdoo (1972), James Worthy (1982), Michael Jordan (1984), J.R. Reid (1989), Jerry Stackhouse (1995), Rasheed Wallace (1995), Jeff McInnis (1996), Antawn Jamison (1998), Vince Carter (1998), Joseph Forte (2001), Raymond Felton (2005), Sean May (2005), Rashad McCants (2005), Marvin Williams (2005), Brandan Wright (2007), Wayne Ellington (2009), Ty Lawson (2009), Ed Davis (2010), Harrison Barnes (2012), John Henson (2012), Kendall Marshall (2012), Reggie Bullock (2013), P.J. Hairston (2014)

UCLA (19) - Richard Washington (1976), Stuart Gray (1984), Tracy Murray (1992), Jelani McCoy (1998), Baron Davis (1999), Jerome Moiso (2000), Trevor Ariza (2004), Jordan Farmar (2006), Arron Afflalo (2007), Kevin Love (2008), Luc Mbah a Moute (2008), Russell Westbrook (2008), Jrue Holiday (2009), Tyler Honeycutt (2011), Malcolm Lee (2011), Shabazz Muhammad (2013), Jordan Adams (2014), Kyle Anderson (2014), Zach LaVine (2014)

Kansas (17) - Norm Cook (1976), Darrin Hancock (1994), Paul Pierce (1998), Drew Gooden (2002), Julian Wright (2007), Darrell Arthur (2008), Mario Chalmers (2008), Brandon Rush (2008), Cole Aldrich (2010), Xavier Henry (2010), Marcus Morris (2011), Markieff Morris (2011), Josh Shelby (2011), Thomas Robinson (2012), Ben McLemore (2013), Joel Embiid (2014), Andrew Wiggins (2014)

Connecticut (16) - Donyell Marshall (1994), Ray Allen (1996), Richard Hamilton (1999), Khalid El-Amin (2000), Caron Butler (2002), Ben Gordon (2004), Emeka Okafor (2004), Charlie Villanueva (2005), Josh Boone (2006), Rudy Gay (2006), Marcus Williams (2006), Hasheem Thabeet (2009), Kemba Walker (2011), Andre Drummond (2012), Jeremy Lamb (2012), DeAndre Daniels (2014)

Louisiana State (15) - DeWayne Scales (1980), Jerry Reynolds (1985), John Williams (1986), Chris Jackson (1990), Stanley Roberts (1991), Shaquille O'Neal (1992), Ronnie Henderson (1996), Randy Livingston (1996), Stromile Swift (2000), Brandon Bass (2005), Tyrus Thomas (2006), Glen Davis (2007), Anthony Randolph (2008), Justin Hamilton (2012), Johnny O'Bryant (2014)

Michigan (15) - Campy Russell (1974), Tim McCormick (1984), Sean Higgins (1990), Chris Webber (1993), Jalen Rose (1994), Juwan Howard (1994), Maurice Taylor (1997), Robert Traylor (1998), Jamal Crawford (2000), Darius Morris (2011), Trey Burke (2013), Tim Hardaway Jr. (2013), Mitch McGary (2014), Glenn Robinson III (2014), Nik Stauskas (2014)

Arizona (14) - Eric Money (1974), Coniel Norman (1974), Brian Williams (1991), Mike Bibby (1998), Gilbert Arenas (2001), Richard Jefferson (2001), Michael Wright (2001), Andre Iguodala (2004), Marcus Williams (2006), Jerryd Bayless (2008), Derrick Williams (2011), Grant Jerrett (2013), Aaron Gordon (2014), Nick Johnson (2014)

Duke (13) - William Avery (1999), Elton Brand (1999), Corey Maggette (1999), Carlos Boozer (2002), Mike Dunleavy Jr. (2002), Jay Williams (2002), Luol Deng (2004), Josh McRoberts (2007), Gerald Henderson (2009), Kyrie Irving (2011), Austin Rivers (2012), Rodney Hood (2014), Jabari Parker (2014)

Memphis (13) - Larry Kenon (1973), William Bedford (1986), Vincent Askew (1987), Sylvester Gray (1988), Penny Hardaway (1993), David Vaughn III (1995), Lorenzen Wright (1996), Dajuan Wagner (2002), Shawne Williams (2006), Chris Douglas-Roberts (2008), Derrick Rose (2008), Elliot Williams (2010), Will Barton (2012)

Texas (12) - LaSalle Thompson (1982), Chris Mihm (2000), T.J. Ford (2003), LaMarcus Aldridge (2006), Daniel Gibson (2006), P.J. Tucker (2006), Kevin Durant (2007), D.J. Augustin (2008), Avery Bradley (2010), Jordan Hamilton (2011), Cory Joseph (2011), Tristan Thompson (2011)

Georgia Tech (11) - Dennis Scott (1990), Kenny Anderson (1991), Stephon Marbury (1996), Dion Glover (1999), Chris Bosh (2003), Jarrett Jack (2005), Javaris Crittenton (2007), Thaddeus Young (2007), Derrick Favors (2010), Gani Lawal (2010), Iman Shumpert (2011)

Ohio State (11) - Clark Kellogg (1982), Jim Jackson (1992), Michael Redd (2000), Mike Conley Jr. (2007), Daequan Cook (2007), Greg Oden (2007), Kosta Koufos (2008), B.J. Mullens (2009), Evan Turner (2010), Jared Sullinger (2012), Deshaun Thomas (2013)

Syracuse (11) - Pearl Washington (1986), Billy Owens (1991), Carmelo Anthony (2003), Donte Greene (2008), Johnny Flynn (2009), Wesley Johnson (2010), Fab Melo (2012), Dion Waiters (2012), Michael Carter-Williams (2013), Tyler Ennis (2014), Jerami Grant (2014)

One and Done: First Four NBA Draft Selections Were College Freshmen

The newcomers are the latest not to give themselves sufficient time at the college level to amass one-for-the-books or one-for-the-ages career records. Andrew Wiggins (Kansas), the first of freshmen selected in the 2014 NBA draft, was the sixth freshman in the last eight years to become the first choice in the draft.

Julius Randle became the sixth Kentucky freshman in the last five years to be among the NBA's top eight draft picks. Six of the top nine choices this year are among the following alphabetical list of 91 freshmen, only 18 hanging around long enough to become an All-American, who left universities since troubled Dontonio Wingfield became the first major-college "one 'n done" frosh upon departing from Cincinnati in 1994:

Freshman Draftee Pos. College NBA Team Drafted By Year Round Overall Pick
Shareef Abdur-Rahim F-C California Vancouver Grizzlies 1996 1st 3rd
Steven Adams F Pittsburgh Oklahoma City Thunder 2013 1st 12th
Carmelo Anthony F Syracuse Denver Nuggets 2003 1st 3rd
Trevor Ariza F UCLA New York Knicks 2004 2nd 43rd
Jerryd Bayless G Arizona Indiana Pacers 2008 1st 11th
Bradley Beal G-F Florida Washington Wizards 2012 1st 3rd
Michael Beasley F Kansas State Miami Heat 2008 1st 2nd
Anthony Bennett F UNLV Cleveland Cavaliers 2013 1st 1st
Eric Bledsoe G Kentucky Oklahoma City Thunder 2010 1st 18th
Chris Bosh F Georgia Tech Toronto Raptors 2003 1st 4th
Avery Bradley G Texas Boston Celtics 2010 1st 19th
Mike Conley Jr. G Ohio State Memphis Grizzlies 2007 1st 4th
Daequan Cook G Ohio State Philadelphia 76ers 2007 1st 21st
Omar Cook G St. John's Orlando Magic 2001 2nd 32nd
Jamal Crawford G Michigan Cleveland Cavaliers 2000 1st 8th
Javaris Crittenton G Georgia Tech Los Angeles Lakers 2007 1st 19th
Anthony Davis C Kentucky New Orleans Hornets 2012 1st 1st
Ricky Davis F Iowa Charlotte Hornets 1998 1st 21st
Luol Deng F Duke Phoenix Suns 2004 1st 7th
DeMar DeRozan F Southern California Toronto Raptors 2009 1st 9th
Andre Drummond C Connecticut Detroit Pistons 2012 1st 9th
Kevin Durant F Texas Seattle SuperSonics 2007 1st 2nd
Joel Embiid C Kansas Philadelphia 76ers 2014 1st 3rd
Tyler Ennis G Syracuse Phoenix Suns 2014 1st 18th
Tyreke Evans G Memphis Sacramento Kings 2009 1st 4th
Derrick Favors F Georgia Tech New Jersey Nets 2010 1st 3rd
Alton Ford F Houston Phoenix Suns 2001 2nd 51st
Keith "Tiny" Gallon C Oklahoma Milwaukee Bucks 2010 2nd 47th
Dion Glover G Georgia Tech Atlanta Hawks 1999 1st 20th
Archie Goodwin G-F Kentucky Oklahoma City Thunder 2013 1st 29th
Aaron Gordon F Arizona Orlando Magic 2014 1st 4th
Eric Gordon G Indiana Los Angeles Clippers 2008 1st 7th
Donte Greene F Syracuse Memphis Grizzlies 2008 1st 28th
Eddie Griffin F Seton Hall New Jersey Nets 2001 1st 7th
Maurice Harkless F St. John's Philadelphia 76ers 2012 1st 15th
Tobias Harris F Tennessee Charlotte Bobcats 2011 1st 19th
Donnell Harvey F Florida New York Knicks 2000 1st 22nd
Spencer Hawes C Washington Sacramento Kings 2007 1st 10th
Xavier Henry G Kansas Memphis Grizzlies 2010 1st 12th
J.J. Hickson F North Carolina State Cleveland Cavaliers 2008 1st 19th
Jrue Holiday G UCLA Philadelphia 76ers 2009 1st 17th
Larry Hughes G Saint Louis Philadelphia 76ers 1998 1st 8th
Kris Humphries F Minnesota Utah Jazz 2004 1st 14th
Grant Jerrett F Arizona Portland Trail Blazers 2013 2nd 40th
DerMarr Johnson G Cincinnati Atlanta Hawks 2000 1st 6th
DeAndre Jordan C Texas A&M Los Angeles Clippers 2008 2nd 35th
Cory Joseph G Texas San Antonio Spurs 2011 1st 29th
Michael Kidd-Gilchrist F Kentucky Charlotte Bobcats 2012 1st 2nd
Brandon Knight G Kentucky Detroit Pistons 2011 1st 8th
Kosta Koufos C Ohio State Utah Jazz 2008 1st 23rd
Zach LaVine G UCLA Minnesota Timberwolves 2014 1st 13th
Ricky Ledo G Providence Milwaukee Bucks 2013 2nd 43rd
Kevin Love F UCLA Memphis Grizzlies 2008 1st 5th
Corey Maggette F Duke Seattle SuperSonics 1999 1st 13th
Stephon Marbury G Georgia Tech Milwaukee Bucks 1996 1st 4th
O.J. Mayo G Southern California Minnesota Timberwolves 2008 1st 3rd
Ben McLemore G-F Kansas Sacramento Kings 2013 1st 7th
Quincy Miller F Baylor Denver Nuggets 2012 2nd 38th
Shabazz Muhammad G UCLA Utah Jazz 2013 1st 14th
B.J. Mullens C Ohio State Dallas Mavericks 2009 1st 24th
Nerlens Noel C Kentucky New Orleans Pelicans 2013 1st 6th
Greg Oden C Ohio State Portland Trail Blazers 2007 1st 1st
Daniel Orton C-F Kentucky Orlando Magic 2010 1st 29th
Jabari Parker F Duke Milwaukee Bucks 2014 1st 2nd
Julius Randle F Kentucky Los Angeles Lakers 2014 1st 7th
Anthony Randolph F Louisiana State Golden State Warriors 2008 1st 14th
Zach Randolph C Michigan State Portland Trail Blazers 2001 1st 19th
Austin Rivers G Duke New Orleans Hornets 2012 1st 10th
Derrick Rose G Memphis Chicago Bulls 2008 1st 1st
Jamal Sampson F-C California Utah Jazz 2002 2nd 47th
Josh Selby G Kansas Memphis Grizzlies 2011 2nd 49th
Lance Stephenson F Cincinnati Indiana Pacers 2010 2nd 40th
Marquis Teague G Kentucky Chicago Bulls 2012 1st 29th
Tim Thomas F Villanova New Jersey Nets 1997 1st 7th
Tyrus Thomas F Louisiana State Portland Trail Blazers 2006 1st 4th
Tristan Thompson F Texas Cleveland Cavaliers 2011 1st 4th
Noah Vonleh F Indiana Charlotte Bobcats 2014 1st 9th
Dajuan Wagner G Memphis Cleveland Cavaliers 2002 1st 6th
Bill Walker F Kansas State Washington Wizards 2008 2nd 47th
John Wall G Kentucky Washington Wizards 2010 1st 1st
Gerald Wallace F Alabama Sacramento Kings 2001 1st 25th
Rodney White F Charlotte Detroit Pistons 2001 1st 9th
Hassan Whiteside C Marshall Sacramento Kings 2010 2nd 33rd
Andrew Wiggins G-F Kansas Cleveland Cavaliers 2014 1st 1st
Marvin Williams F North Carolina Atlanta Hawks 2005 1st 2nd
Shawne Williams F Memphis Indiana Pacers 2006 1st 17th
Dontonio Wingfield F Cincinnati Seattle SuperSonics 1994 2nd 37th
Brandan Wright F North Carolina Charlotte Hornets 2007 1st 8th
Tony Wroten Jr. G Washington Memphis Grizzlies 2012 1st 25th
James Young G-F Kentucky Boston Celtics 2014 1st 17th
Thaddeus Young F Georgia Tech Philadelphia 76ers 2007 1st 12th

NOTE: Manute Bol (DII Bridgeport in 1985) and Shawn Kemp (JC Trinity Valley in 1989) were the first two non-NCAA DI players selected as freshmen. Ledo did not play with PC for academic reasons.

Bruised Egos: Four Additional All-Americans Not Selected in NBA Draft

What were they thinking? They must not have taken an independent-study college course in deductive reasoning. Undergraduates Khem Birch (UNLV), Jabari Brown (Missouri), Jahii Carson (Arizona State), Alex Kirk (New Mexico), James Michael McAdoo (North Carolina), Eric Moreland (Oregon State), LaQuinton Ross (Ohio State), JaKarr Sampson (St. John's) and Roscoe Smith (UNLV) - potential All-Americans if they returned to school - were not among the chosen few in this year's NBA draft. Of course, the NBA is a difficult nut to crack. Even if they became All-Americans, there were no guarantees any of them would be selected in 2015.

A total of 15 All-Americans weren't drafted in the last seven NBA drafts. Do you need any more evidence that the quality of play at the collegiate level has diminished in recent years? The NBA draft was reduced to seven rounds in 1985, three rounds in 1988 and to its present two rounds in 1989. Centers Bill Spivey of Kentucky and Sherman White of LIU, All-Americans in the early 1950s, went undrafted by the NBA allegedly because of possible repercussions stemming from a game-fixing scandal. A total of 25 All-Americans, including five in 2011, have gone undrafted by the NBA thus far in the 21st Century.

Four years ago, Sherron Collins (Kansas) and Scottie Reynolds (Villanova) became the initial NCAA consensus first-team All-Americans not to be selected in the NBA draft. Three NCAA consensus second-team All-Americans - Melvin Ejim (Iowa State), C.J. Fair (Syracuse) and Sean Kilpatrick (Cincinnati) - joined the following alphabetical list of All-Americans who weren't selected in the NBA draft:

Undrafted All-American Pos. School A-A Year(s)
Charlie Bell G Michigan State 2001
Melvin Booker G Missouri 1994**
Joe Capua G Wyoming 1956
Sherron Collins G Kansas 2009** and 2010*
Erwin Dudley F-C Alabama 2002
Melvin Ejim F Iowa State 2014**
C.J. Fair F Syracuse 2014**
Jason Gardner G Arizona 2002 and 2003**
Ben Hansbrough G Notre Dame 2011**
Udonis Haslem C Florida 2001 and 2002
Bobby Joe Hill G Texas Western 1966
Terrell "Tu" Holloway G Xavier 2011
Kevin Houston G Army 1987
Keith "Mister" Jennings G East Tennessee State 1991**
Kevin Jones F West Virginia 2012**
Sean Kilpatrick G Cincinnati 2014**
Brandin Knight G Pittsburgh 2002
Byron Larkin G Xavier 1988
Chris Lofton G Tennessee 2007** and 2008**
John Lucas III G Oklahoma State 2004
Billy McCaffrey G Vanderbilt 1993**
Jerel McNeal G Marquette 2009
DeMarcus Nelson G-F Duke 2008
Kevin Pittsnogle F West Virginia 2006
Mike Pratt F Kentucky 1974
Hollis Price G Oklahoma 2003**
Jacob Pullen G Kansas State 2011
Allan Ray G Villanova 2006**
Dexter Reed G Memphis State 1977
Scottie Reynolds G Villanova 2010*
Bill Ridley G Illinois 1956
Juan "Pepe" Sanchez G Temple 2000
Jon Scheyer G Duke 2010**
Shea Seals F-G Tulsa 1997
Ron Slay F Tennessee 2003
Charles E. Smith G Georgetown 1989
Jordan Taylor G Wisconsin 2011
Scottie Wilbekin G Florida 2014
Max Williams G Southern Methodist 1960
Andre Woolridge G Iowa 1997

*NCAA consensus first-team All-American.
**NCAA consensus second-team All-American.
NOTE: Bell, Booker, Collins, Hansbrough, Haslem, Jennings, Jones, Lucas, McNeal, Ray, Sanchez and Smith went on to play in the NBA after signing as free agents. Pratt played in the ABA.

Familiar Territory: Can Shyatt's Second Stint Be Superior to First One?

Larry Shyatt, who posted a 19-9 mark (.679) with Wyoming in 1997-98, returned as the Cowboys coach in 2011-12. Despite securing a contract extension through the remainder of this decade, he will need to dominate the Mountain West Conference similar to the way UNLV did the Big West and Gonzaga in the West Coast to compile a higher winning percentage his second time around out West.

Shyatt boasts an opportunity to achieve something rare after seeking a return to some of the school's glory days. Ronnie Arrow (South Alabama) and Jim McCafferty (Loyola LA) are the only two of the previous 36 mentors in this "Comeback Club" category over the last 60 years to compile a higher winning percentage the second time around.

Lou Carnesecca (St. John's) and Lake Kelly (Austin Peay State) are the only coaches to win NCAA playoff games in two different stints with the same school. Following is an alphabetical list of coaches who returned to their former major-college stomping grounds if their tenures weren't interrupted solely because of World War II:

Two-Time Coach DI College First Stint W-L Pct. Second Stint W-L Pct.
Ronnie Arrow South Alabama 1988-95 114-93 .551 2008-13 97-68 .588
Tom Asbury Pepperdine 1989-94 125-59 .679 2009-11 28-68 .292
Lou Carnesecca St. John's 1966-70 104-35 .748 1974-92 422-165 .719
Paul Cormier Dartmouth 1985-91 87-95 .478 2011-14 31-83 .272
Kermit Davis Idaho 1989 and 1990 50-12 .806 1997 13-17 .433
Mike Dement UNC Greensboro 1992-95 55-56 .495 2006-12 69-125 .356
Homer Drew Valparaiso 1989-2002 235-185 .560 2004-11 136-120 .531
Marshall Emery Delaware State 1977-79 30-50 .375 1986-88 18-66 .214
Dan Fitzgerald Gonzaga 1979-81 51-29 .638 1986-97 203-140 .592
Blair Gullion Washington (Mo.) 1948-52 65-41 .613 1954-59 69-61 .531
Lou Henson New Mexico State 1967-75 173-71 .709 1998-2005 136-105 .564
Ben Jobe Southern (La.) 1987-96 191-100 .656 2002 and 2003 16-40 .286
Phil Johnson San Jose State 1999 12-16 .429 2003-05 19-67 .221
Donald Kellett Penn 1944 and 1945 22-9 .710 1947 and 1948 24-22 .522
Lake Kelly Austin Peay State 1972-77 110-52 .679 1986-90 79-70 .530
Joe Lapchick St. John's 1937-47 181-54 .770 1957-65 154-75 .672
Abe Lemons Oklahoma City 1956-73 309-181 .631 1984-90 123-84 .594
Jim McCafferty Loyola (La.) 1950 9-15 .375 1955-57 38-36 .514
Dave McDowell Kent State 1949-51 56-20 .737 1956 and 1957 15-29 .341
Doc Meanwell Wisconsin 1912-17 92-9 .911 1921-34 154-90 .631
Robert Moreland Texas Southern 1976-2001 399-352 .531 2008 7-25 .219
Joe Mullaney Providence 1956-69 271-94 .742 1982-85 48-70 .407
Buzz Peterson Appalachian State 1997-2000 79-39 .669 2010 24-13 .649
Bill Reinhart George Washington 1936-42 100-38 .725 1950-66 216-201 .518
Elmer Ripley Georgetown 1928 and 1929 24-6 .800 1939-43 68-39 .636
Elmer Ripley Georgetown 1939-43 68-39 .636 1947-49 41-37 .526
Jack Rohan Columbia 1962-74 154-161 .489 1991-95 43-87 .331
Glen Rose Arkansas 1934-42 154-47 .766 1953-66 171-154 .526
John "Honey" Russell Seton Hall 1937-43 101-32 .759 1950-60 194-97 .647
Larry Shyatt Wyoming 1998 19-9 .679 2012-14 59-41 .590
Norm Sloan Florida 1961-66 85-63 .574 1981-89 150-131 .534
Ken Trickey Oral Roberts 1970-74 118-23 .837 1988-93 96-93 .508
Billy Tubbs Lamar 1977-80 75-46 .620 2004-06 46-43 .517
Butch van Breda Kolff Lafayette 1952-55 68-34 .667 1985-88 64-51 .557
Butch van Breda Kolff Hofstra 1956-62 112-43 .723 1989-94 79-81 .494
Donald White Rutgers 1946-56 98-145 .403 1963 7-16 .304
Davey Whitney Alcorn State 1971-89 395-199 .665 1997-2003 115-93 .553

NOTES: VBK also had two stints at Hofstra, but Hofstra wasn't at the major-college level his first stint there. . . . OCU de-emphasized its program to the NAIA level after Lemons returned. . . . ORU wasn't always at the Division I level for either of Trickey's stints.

Tony Gwynn Among College Basketball's Link to Baseball Hall of Fame

The Baseball Hall of Fame is hallowed ground. Deceased Tony Gwynn (two-time All-WAC hoop selection for San Diego State) is among the versatile athletes who went from the basketball court to holding court by achieving stardom in baseball's HOF. The following individuals among the more than 300 MLB Hall of Famers were college hoopsters:

WALTER ALSTON, Miami (Ohio)
Managed the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers for 23 seasons (1954 through 1976), winning seven National League pennants and three World Series. In eight All-Star Game assignments, Alston was the winning manager a record seven times. He struck out in his only major league at-bat with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1936. . . . The 6-2, 195-pound Alston, a charter member of his alma mater's Athletic Hall of Fame, lettered in basketball in 1932-33, 1933-34 and 1934-35. He scored 10 of Miami's 15 points in a 32-15 defeat against Indiana in his senior season.

LOU BOUDREAU, Illinois
Infielder hit .295 in 15 seasons (1938 through 1952) with the Cleveland Indians and Boston Red Sox. Managed Indians, Red Sox, Kansas City Athletics and Chicago Cubs, starting his managerial career at the age of 24 in 1942. As player-manager in 1948, the shortstop led Cleveland to the A.L. title and earned MVP honors by hitting .355 with 116 RBI. He hit a modest .273 in the World Series. The seven-time All-Star led the A.L. with 45 doubles on three occasions (1941, 1944 and 1947) and paced the league in batting average in 1944 (.327). . . . Played two varsity basketball seasons for Illinois (1936-37 and 1937-38) under coach Doug Mills. As a sophomore, Boudreau led the Illini in scoring with an 8.7-point average as the team shared the Big Ten Conference title. Compiled an 8.8 average the next year. After helping the Illini upset St. John's in a game at Madison Square Garden, the New York Daily News described him as "positively brilliant" and said he "set up countless plays in breathtaking fashion." . . . Averaged 8.2 points per game for Hammond (Ind.) in the National Basketball League in 1938-39.

ALBERT B. "HAPPY" CHANDLER, Transylvania (Ky.)
Twice governor of Kentucky (1935-39 and 1955-59), U.S. senator (1939-45) and commissioner of baseball (1945-51). He oversaw the initial steps toward integration of the major leagues. Democrat embraced the "Dixiecrats" in the late 1940s. . . . Captain of Transylvania's basketball team as a senior in 1920-21.

GORDON "MICKEY" COCHRANE, Boston University
Hall of Famer hit .320 (highest career mark ever for a catcher) with the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers in 13 seasons from 1925 through 1937. Swatted three homers in a single game as a rookie. Lefthanded swinger was A.L. MVP in 1928 and 1934. Led the A.L. in on-base percentage in 1933 (.459) and ranked among the league top nine in batting average five times (1927-30-31-33-35). Participated in five World Series (1929-30-31-34-35). . . . Five-sport athlete with BU, including basketball (class of '24).

EARLE COMBS, Eastern Kentucky
Hall of Fame outfielder hit .325 with the New York Yankees in 12 seasons from 1924 through 1935. Lefthanded swinger led the A.L. in hits with 231 in 1927 when he also paced the the league in singles and triples. Also led the A.L. in triples in 1928 and 1930. Assembled a 29-game hitting streak in 1931. Leadoff hitter and "table-setter" for the Yankees' potent "Murderer's Row" offense ranked among the A.L. top six in runs eight straight years when he became the first player in modern major league history to score at least 100 runs in his first eight full seasons. Posted a .350 batting average in four World Series (1926-27-28-32) before a pair of serious collisons shortened his productive career. Served as coach with the Yankees (1936-44), St. Louis Browns (1947), Boston Red Sox (1948-54) and Philadelphia Phillies (1955). . . . Captain of his alma mater's basketball squad for three years when the school was known as Eastern State Normal.

LARRY DOBY, Virginia Union
Outfielder hit .283 with 253 home runs and 969 RBI in a 13-year career from 1947 through 1959 with the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. The first black player in the American League twice led the A.L. in homers (32 in 1952 and 1954). He was the first African-American to lead a league in homers (1952 and 1954) and the first to participate in the World Series (1948). Hit 20 or more round-trippers eight consecutive seasons from 1949 through 1956 while finishing among the A.L. top nine in slugging percentage each year. The seven-time All-Star drove in 100 or more runs five times, leading the A.L. with 126 in 1954 when the Indians won 111 games before being swept by the New York Giants in the World Series. Appeared in 1948 and 1954 World Series with the Indians, winning Game 4 in '48 with a homer off Braves star Johnny Sain. Doby managed the White Sox for most of 1978 (37-50 record). . . . The 6-1, 180-pounder attended LIU on a basketball scholarship but transferred to Virginia Union prior to the start of the season after Uncle Sam summoned him for World War II service. Doby was told Virginia Union had a ROTC program and he could complete his freshman season before being drafted. He became eligible the second semester of the 1942-43 season and was a reserve guard on a team that won the CIAA title.

RICK FERRELL, Guilford (N.C.)
Catcher hit over .300 five times en route to a .281 career batting average with the St. Louis Browns, Boston Red Sox and Washington Senators in 18 years from 1929 through 1947. He set an A.L. record with 1,805 games behind the plate. Traded with his brother (pitcher Wes Ferrell) from Boston to Washington during the 1937 campaign. . . . The 5-10, 160-pounder was a basketball forward before graduating in 1928.

FRANKIE FRISCH, Fordham
Registered a run of 11 consecutive .300 seasons and set fielding records for chances and assists with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1927. As player-manager with the Cards, he instilled the rollicking all-out style of hardnosed play that prompted a team nickname of "The Gashouse Gang." His season strikeout total topped 20 only twice en route to a .316 average in his 19-year career, which also included a stint with the New York Giants. . . . According to his bio in Total Baseball, "The Fordham Flash" captained the Rams' basketball squad. In 1925, Frisch officiated the first-ever game played in the Rose Hill Gym (the oldest NCAA Division I facility in the nation).

BOB GIBSON, Creighton
Compiled a 251-174 pitching record with 3,117 strikeouts and 2.91 ERA in 17 seasons (1959 through 1975) with the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1968, he pitched 13 shutouts en route to a 1.12 ERA, the second-lowest since 1893 in 300 innings. Gibson notched a 7-2 mark and 1.89 ERA in nine games in the 1964, 1967 and 1968 World Series (92 strikeouts in 81 innings). He set a World Series record with 17 strikeouts against the Detroit Tigers on October 2, 1968. . . . First Creighton player to average 20 points per game for his career (20.2). Led the school in scoring in 1955-56 (40th in the country with 22 ppg) and 1956-57 and was second-leading scorer in 1954-55 before playing one season (1957-58) with the Harlem Globetrotters. Sketch from school brochure: "Possesses outstanding jump shot and for height (6-1) is a terrific rebounder."

TONY GWYNN, San Diego State
Padres outfielder hit .338 in 20 seasons (1982 through 2001), winning eight N.L. batting titles--1984, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1994, 1995, 1996 and 1997. Played in 15th All-Star Game in 1999 before topping the 3,000-hit plateau later in the year. Holds N.L. record for most years leading league in singles (six). Won a Gold Glove five times (1986-87-89-90-91). He hit .368 in the 1984 N.L. Championship Series to help San Diego reach the World Series against the Detroit Tigers. Also participated in the 1998 World Series against the New York Yankees. Became baseball coach at his alma mater after retiring from the major leagues. . . . Averaged 8.6 ppg and 5.5 apg in 107 games with the Aztecs in four seasons (1977-78 through 1980-81). The 5-11, 170-pound guard was named second-team All-Western Athletic Conference as both a junior and senior. Led the WAC in assists as both a sophomore and junior and was third as a senior. Paced San Diego State in steals each of his last three seasons. Selected in the 10th round of 1981 NBA draft by the San Diego Clippers.

MONTE IRVIN, Lincoln (Pa.)
Outfielder-first baseman hit .293 with 99 home runs and 443 RBI in eight major league years (1949 through 1956) with the New York Giants and Chicago Cubs. Irvin led the N.L. in RBI with 121 in 1951, the same year he led the World Series in hitting (.458 vs. crosstown Yankees) after collecting seven hits in the first two contests of the six-game set. He was a member of the Giants' squad that swept the Cleveland Indians in the 1954 World Series. The 6-1, 195-pounder was one of the first black players signed after baseball's color line was broken in 1947. Among the brightest stars in the Negro Leagues, he registered league highs of .422 in 1940 and .396 in 1941 before spending three years in the Army. . . . His athletic career was nearly prematurely ended when an infection from a scratched hand in a basketball game kept him close to death for seven weeks. Irvin participated in basketball for 1 1/2 years in the late 1930s for Lincoln, an all-black university in Oxford, Pa., before dropping out of school.

SANDY KOUFAX, Cincinnati
Compiled a 165-87 record and 2.76 ERA in 12 seasons as a lefthanded pitcher with the Brooklyn (1955 through 1957) and Los Angeles (1958 through 1966) Dodgers. Led the N.L. in ERA in each of his last five seasons, going 25-5 in 1963 (MVP), 26-8 in 1965 and 27-9 in 1966 (Cy Young Award). Pitched four no-hitters and had 98 games with at least 20 strikeouts. Notched a 4-3 record and 0.95 ERA in eight World Series games in 1959, 1963 (MVP), 1965 (MVP) and 1966. . . . The Brooklyn native attended Cincinnati one year on a combination baseball/basketball scholarship before signing a pro baseball contract for a reported $20,000 bonus. He was the third-leading scorer with a 9.7-point average as a 6-2, 195-pound forward for the Bearcats' 12-2 freshman team in 1953-54. Koufax compiled a 3-1 pitching record in his lone college baseball campaign, averaging 14.3 strikeouts and 8.4 bases on balls per game when his statistics are converted to a nine-inning game ratio. . . . Ed Jucker, coach of Cincinnati's NCAA titlists in 1961 and 1962, coached the Bearcats' baseball squad and freshman basketball team in 1953-54. Jucker said of Koufax's basketball ability: "He could jump extremely well, was a strong kid and a good driver. He would have made a fine varsity player. We certainly could have used him." If viewers pay attention to CBS acknowledging celebrities in the stands during telecasts with crowd shots, they've probably noticed that Koufax regularly attends the Final Four.

TED LYONS, Baylor
Spent his entire 21-year career with the Chicago White Sox (1923 through 1942 and 1946) after never playing in the minors. Managed the White Sox from 1946 through 1948. Three-time 20-game winner compiled a 260-230 record and 3.67 ERA in 594 games. He pitched a no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox in 1926. In 1939, Lyons hurled 42 consecutive innings without issuing a walk. . . . Earned four basketball letters at Baylor from 1919-20 through 1922-23. Consensus first-team selection on All-Southwest Conference squad as a sophomore and senior.

CHRISTY MATHEWSON, Bucknell
Often regarded as baseball's greatest pitcher, the righthander compiled a 372-188 record and 2.13 ERA with 79 shutouts for the New York Giants in 17 years from 1900 to 1916 before winning his lone start with Cincinnati in 1916. Led the N.L. in ERA five times (1905-08-09-11-13). Hall of Famer ranked among the N.L. top five in victories 12 years in a row from 1903 through 1914. Paced the N.L. in strikeouts on five occasions in a six-year span from 1903 through 1908. Won 30 games or more in three consecutive seasons, leading the Giants in their 1905 World Series victory over the Philadelphia Athletics by hurling three shutouts in six days. Also appeared in three straight World Series from 1911 through 1913. . . . The 6-2 Mathewson also played football and basketball at the turn of the 20th Century for Bucknell (class of '02).

CUM POSEY, Penn State/Duquesne
Founder and co-owner of the Homestead Greys professional baseball team that won eight consecutive National Negro League titles. . . . Posey was the first African American to complete in intercollegiate athletics for Penn State in 1910-11. He later attended Duquesne. A legend in Pittsburgh sports history was owner/player for the famed Leondi Club, an independent basketball team that was the National Negro Championship team for many years.

EPPA RIXEY JR., Virginia
Compiled a 266-251 record with 3.15 ERA in 21 seasons (1912 through 1917 and 1919 through 1933) with the Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds. He never played a minor league game and appeared in the 1915 World Series with the Phillies. Missed the 1918 campaign while serving overseas with an Army chemical-warfare division. Rixey won 19 or more games six years, including 1922 when he led the N.L. with 25 victories with the Reds. In his next to last season, he pitched a string of 27 consecutive scoreless innings at age 42. The N.L.'s winningest lefthanded pitcher until Warren Spahn broke his record was selected to the Hall of Fame in 1963. . . . The 6-5, 210-pound Rixey, who also played golf at Virginia, earned basketball letters in 1911-12 and 1913-14.

ROBIN ROBERTS, Michigan State
Compiled a 286-245 record in 19 seasons (1948 through 1966) with the Philadelphia Phillies, Baltimore Orioles, Houston Astros and Chicago Cubs. He was a twenty-game winner for six consecutive seasons with the Phillies (1950 through 1955), leading the N.L. in victories the last four years in that span. The seven-time All-Star lost his only World Series start in 1950, 2-1, when the Yankees' Joe DiMaggio homered off him in the 10th inning. . . . Roberts played three seasons of basketball with the Spartans (1944-45 through 1946-47). He averaged 10.6 points per game as a freshman (team's third-leading scorer as he was eligible because of WWII), 9.8 as a sophomore (second-leading scorer) and 9.0 as a junior (second-leading scorer). The 6-0, 190-pound forward led the team in field-goal percentage as a junior captain. Sketch from school basketball guide: "Regarded by newsmen as one of the greatest players today in college basketball. A poll by Detroit Free Press named him the 'most valuable' collegiate player in Michigan. He is not especially fast, but he's extremely well-coordinated, passes exceptionally well, and is a beautiful one-hand shot artist."

JACKIE ROBINSON, UCLA
Infielder hit .311 with 137 homers as a regular on six N.L. pennant winners with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 10 seasons (1947 through 1956). After becoming Rookie of the Year in 1947, Robinson was named MVP in 1949 when he led the N.L. with a .342 batting average and 37 stolen bases. The six-time All-Star homered in the 1952 All-Star Game. He had two homers and seven doubles in World Series competition. . . . Football, basketball and track standout at Pasadena City College in 1937-38 and 1938-39. Named to All-Southern California Junior College Conference Western Division all-star basketball team both years, a span in which UCLA was winless in league competition. First athlete in UCLA history to letter in football, basketball, baseball and track. Forward compiled the highest scoring average in the Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons at UCLA (12.3 points per league game in 1939-40 as an all-league second-team selection and 11.1 in 1940-41). In his last UCLA athletic contest, he accounted for more than half of the Bruins' output with 20 points in a 52-37 loss to Southern California.

DAVE WINFIELD, Minnesota
Outfielder hit .283 with 465 home runs, 1,833 RBI and 3,110 hits in 22 seasons (1973 through 1988 and 1990 through 1995) with the San Diego Padres, New York Yankees, California Angels, Toronto Blue Jays, Minnesota Twins and Cleveland Indians. Appeared in 12 All-Star Games after never playing in the minors. Participated in the World Series with the Yankees (1981) and Blue Jays (1992). . . . Played two seasons of varsity basketball as a 6-6, 220-pound forward with the Gophers, averaging 6.9 points and 5.4 rebounds per game as a junior in 1971-72 and 10.5 points and 6.1 rebounds as a senior in 1972-73. He played the entire game in Minnesota's first NCAA Tournament appearance in 1972 under coach Bill Musselman. . . . Selected by the Atlanta Hawks in the fifth round of the 1973 NBA draft and the Utah Stars in the sixth round of the 1973 ABA draft. Didn't play college football, but was chosen in the 17th round of the 1973 NFL draft by the Minnesota Vikings. Excerpt from school guide: "Recruited out of intramural ranks to lend depth, became a starter and was a giant in the stretch drive. Amazing athlete leaps like a man catapulted. Soft touch from medium range."

Hoop Legacy: Father's Day Celebrating Three Generations of Basketball

"It is much easier to become a father than to be one." - Letters to My Son: Reflections on Becoming a Man

Undeniably, it is also much easier to talk about becoming a prominent player than putting in the man hours necessary to earn your spurs and have an impact at a single university like the Guokas clan at Saint Joseph's. Matt Sr. and Matt Jr. went on to become the first father-son tandem to win NBA championships as players before Matt III competed four seasons with the Hawks from 1988-89 through 1991-92.

Gifted by having a father and grandfather with hoop credentials is not a prerequisite for becoming a competent basketball player. Although some observers might think the last couple of generations in the following hoop families were groomed from birth, on-court excellence is earned not inherited.

Hoosier Hysteria's passion can't be denied when considering Indiana families including All-Americans Steve Alford, Eric Montross and Jack Parkinson plus significant DI contributors with last names like Dakich, Plumlee and Shepherd. In deference to Father's Day, new Marshall coach Dan D'Antoni is among the following most accomplished father-son-grandson basketball combinations with at least one of them playing for or coaching a school from a power conference or in national postseason competition:

Grandfather/Father Father/Son Grandson(s)/Son(s)
Sam Alford (Franklin, IN '64) Steve Alford (Indiana '87) Kory Alford (UCLA '16) and Bryce Alford (UCLA '17)
Tom Dakich (Bowling Green State '56) Dan Dakich (Indiana '85) Andrew Dakich (Michigan '17)
Lewis D'Antoni (Concord, WV '37) Dan D'Antoni (Marshall '69) Nick D'Antoni (William & Mary '05)
Don Gatens (Notre Dame '46) Mike Gatens (Iowa '76) Matt Gatens (Iowa '12)
Matt Guokas Sr. (St. Joseph's '38) Matt Guokas Jr. (St. Joseph's '66) Matt Guokas III (St. Joseph's '92)
Bill Hosket Sr. (Ohio State '33) Bill Hosket Jr. (Ohio State '68) Brad Hosket (Ohio State '00)
Press Maravich (Davis & Elkins, WV '41) Pete Maravich (Louisiana State '70) Jaeson Maravich (Alabama, McNeese State and William Carey, MS '04) and Josh Maravich (Louisiana State '05)
Johnny McConathy (Northwestern State '51) Mike McConathy (Louisiana Tech '77) Michael McConathy (Northwestern State '10) and Logan McConathy (Northwestern State '11)
Jack Parkinson (Kentucky '48) Bruce Parkinson (Purdue '77) Austin Parkinson (Purdue '04)
Don Parsons (Rutgers '50) Gary Parsons (Rollins, FL '77) Chandler Parsons (Florida '11)
Albert Schultz (Michigan Tech '44) Perky Plumlee (Tennessee Tech '83) Miles, Mason and Marshall Plumlee with Duke thus far in 21st Century
Bill Reigel (Duquesne/Duke '53/McNeese State '56) Ernie Reigel (Davidson '80) Will Reigel (Davidson '12)
Danny Schultz (Tennessee '64) Danny Schultz (Tennessee Tech '84) Dan Schultz (Tennessee '08)
Bill Shepherd Sr. (Butler '49) Billy Shepherd Jr. (Butler '72) Scott Shepherd (Florida State '96) and Jeff Shepherd (Huntington, IN '99)
John Townsend (Michigan '38) Scott Montross (Michigan '68) Eric Montross (North Carolina '94)

Father's Way: McDermotts Supplant Maravichs as Top Father-Son Tandem

Creighton's move joining the Big East Conference became a Happy Father's Day/Week/Month/Year for coach Greg McDermott when his son, Doug, chose to remain in college for his senior season. The McDermotts moved atop the list of all-time best father-son, coach-player combinations after the Bluejays reached the NCAA Tournament and won a playoff game for the third straight season.

Dad paid about $40,000 for his All-American son to be a senior walk-on after the NCAA granted playmaker teammate Grant Gibbs a sixth year of eligibility. Doug emerged as the first player to capture conference MVP awards in two different leagues, joining LSU legend Pete Maravich as the only other player to win three such league awards while on his father's roster.

Maravich never participated in the NCAA tourney. If Georgia State advances to the 2015 NCAA playoffs, the Hunters (dad Ron and son R.J.) will be a family duo worth tracking. Elsewhere, the McCallums probably would have cracked the following all-time Top 10 of sons playing under their dad at the same school if Ray Jr. had returned to Detroit for his senior season:

Rank Coach/Father School(s) Record Player/Son Pos. Son's Career Summary Under Father
1. Greg McDermott Creighton 107-38 Doug McDermott F Doug was three-time NCAA first-Team All-American from 2011-12 through 2013-14 after originally signing with old Missouri Valley Conference rival Northern Iowa. As a sophomore and junior, he was MVC MVP before earning same award when Bluejays moved to the Big East Conference.
2. Press Maravich Louisiana State 49-35 Pete Maravich G Pete, a three-time unanimous NCAA first-team All-American, became the NCAA's career record holder for total points (3,667 in three years from 1967-68 through 1969-70) and scoring average (44.2 ppg). In his senior season, the Tigers had their highest SEC finish (2nd) and only postseason tournament appearance (NIT) in a 24-year span from 1955 through 1978.
3. Wade Houston Tennessee 60-68 Allan Houston G Allan, a four-time All-SEC first-team selection, averaged more than 20 ppg each of his four seasons en route to becoming the Volunteers' all-time leading scorer (2,801 points from 1989-90 through 1992-93). They participated in the NIT in his freshman and junior campaigns.
4. Bill Berry San Jose State 46-41 Ricky Berry G-F Ricky, after playing his freshman season with Oregon State, averaged 21 ppg, 5.6 rpg and 3.2 apg for the Spartans from 1985-86 through 1987-88 en route to becoming their all-time leading scorer (1,767 points). He was a three-time All-Big West Conference first-team selection.
5. Dick Acres Oral Roberts 47-34 Mark Acres C Dick coached his sons (including Jeff) from midway through the 1982-83 campaign through 1984-85. Mark, a three-time All-Midwestern City Conference first-team selection, averaged 18.5 ppg and 9.6 rpg and shot 56.4% from the floor. Mark was a two-time Midwestern City MVP who led the Titans in scoring and rebounding all four seasons. ORU participated in the 1984 NCAA Tournament.
6. Homer Drew Valparaiso 88-36 Bryce Drew G Bryce, who averaged 17.7 ppg, 5.2 apg and 1.5 spg from 1994-95 through 1997-98 en route to becoming the school's all-time leader in scoring and assists, was the Mid-Continent Conference MVP his last two seasons. The Crusaders won the MCC regular-season and league tournament championships all four years.
7. Dick Bennett Wisconsin-Green Bay 87-34 Tony Bennett G Tony, a three-time All-Mid-Continent Conference first-team selection, averaged 19.4 ppg and 5.1 apg from 1988-89 through 1991-92, finishing as UWGB's all-time leading scorer (2,285 points). He holds the NCAA career record for highest three-point field-goal percentage (.497/minimum of 200 made) and won the Frances Pomeroy Award his senior year as the nation's top player shorter than six feet tall. The Phoenix won the 1991 MCC Tournament and 1992 regular-season title.
8. Sonny Allen SMU/Nevada-Reno 64-48 Billy Allen G Billy averaged 13.1 ppg and 8.2 apg in 1981-82 and 1982-83 after transferring from SMU. The two-time All-Big Sky Conference selection set a UNR single-season record with 8.6 apg as a junior when he was a second-team choice before moving up to first-team status the next year. Billy led the SWC in assists as a freshman in 1978-79 (9 apg) and sophomore in 1979-80 (9.1 apg). He also paced the Mustangs in free-throw percentage both years. In his sophomore season, SMU tied its highest win total (16) in a 15-year span from 1967-68 through 1981-82.
9. Jerry Tarkanian UNLV 77-19 Danny Tarkanian G Danny led the Rebels in assists and steals each of his three seasons from 1981-82 through 1983-84 after transferring from Dixie Junior College (Utah). The All-Pacific Coast Athletic Association second-team selection finished second in the nation with 8.5 apg as a senior. UNLV participated in the NIT in 1982 and NCAA Tournament in 1983 and 1984. The Rebels captured the PCAA regular-season championship in 1983 and 1984.
10. Fred A. Enke Arizona 60-18 Fred W. Enke G Fred W., a future NFL quarterback, was a three-time All-Border Conference first-team selection from 1945-46 through 1947-48. The Wildcats participated in the 1946 NIT after their first of three consecutive league championships.

Numerous Former College Basketball Hoopsters Coached CWS Champions

Florida State's Mike Martin was again denied the possibility of becoming the latest former college basketball player to coach a school to a CWS championship. One of the all-time five winningest college baseball coaches, he boasts the highest winning percentage among NCAA Division I mentors, winning almost three-fourths of his games. Martin, who has guided the Seminoles to the CWS a total of 15 times (1980-86-87-89-91-92-94-95-96-98-99-00-08-10-12), played basketball for Wingate (NC) in the mid-1960s before the institution became a four-year school. One of his junior college hoop teammates was Morris "Mo" McHone, who went on to coach the San Antonio Spurs in 1983-84. Martin coached basketball for Tallahassee (Fla.) Community College in the early 1970s.

Martin, runner-up in 1986 and 1999, isn't the only revered coach frustrated by not capturing a national title. Richard "Itchy" Jones, who averaged 8.9 ppg for Southern Illinois' basketball squad in 1956-57, established a baseball dynasty in 21-year coaching career at his alma mater before accepting a similar position with the Illini in Champaign in 1991. Jones compiled a 1,240-752-6 record before retiring in 2005. In 1971, his second year at Southern Illinois, Jones guided the Salukis to within one game of the national title, finishing second at the College World Series. In 1974 and 1977, Jones brought Southern Illinois back to the CWS, placing third both times. Buoyed by 22 eventual major leaguers, he became the 18th coach in NCAA Division I history to win 1,000 games.

Stanford's Everett Dean, compiling a 3-0 basketball tournament record in 1942, is the only unbeaten coach in NCAA playoff history. He is also the only NCAA basketball championship coach to win a College World Series baseball game for the same school as a coach (1953). Following is an alphabetical list of previous ex-college hoopsters who went the extra step and reached the milestone of coaching a CWS titlist:

JOHN "JACK" BARRY, Holy Cross
Infielder, primarily a shortstop, hit .243 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox in 11 A.L. seasons from 1908 through 1919. Ranked fifth in the league in RBI in 1913 with 85 for the Athletics as a key component of Connie Mack's first dynasty. Participated in five World Series, four with the champion, in a six-year span from 1910 through 1915. Compiled a 90-62 managerial record with the Red Sox in 1917 before winning more than 80% of his games coaching his alma mater for 40 years (including capturing the 1952 College World Series). The 5-9 Barry was a basketball letterman for the Crusaders in 1908.

SAM BARRY, Wisconsin
Basketball Hall of Famer coached USC's 1948 baseball titlist. He is the Trojans' all-time winningest basketball coach.

RAY "PICK" FISHER, Middlebury (VT)
Righthander compiled a 100-94 record and 2.82 ERA with the New York Yankees and Cincinnati Reds in 10 years from 1910 through 1920. Ranked among the A.L. top 10 in ERA and complete games in back-to-back seasons (1914 and 1915). Started one World Series game for the Reds against the Chicago White Sox in 1919. Won 14 Big Ten Conference championships as baseball coach at Michigan for 38 years until the late 1950s (including 1953 College World Series title). Became a spring training pitching instructor for the Detroit Tigers after being blacklisted for almost 40 years because of salary disputes with Cincinnati's owners. Fisher played "class" basketball (1910 graduate) before becoming his alma mater's first full-time salaried member of the Physical Education Department.

MARTIN KAROW, Ohio State
Coach of his alma mater's 1966 College World Series winner after the Buckeyes finished runner-up the previous year. He was a basketball letterman in 1925.

JERRY KINDALL, Minnesota
Infielder hit .213 in nine seasons (1956 through 1958 and 1960 through 1965) with the Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians and Minnesota Twins. Baseball coach at Arizona for more than 20 years, leading the Wildcats to three College World Series titles (1976, 1980 and 1986). He is the only player to hit for the cycle in the College World Series at Omaha (against Ole Miss on June 11, 1956). Kindall is the only individual to play for and coach CWS champions. The 6-2 1/2, 175-pounder played two seasons of varsity basketball for Minnesota under coach Ozzie Cowles, averaging 1.4 ppg as a sophomore in 1954-55 and 6.9 ppg as a junior in 1955-56. Excerpt from school guide: "Exceptionally quick reflexes and a good eye are his main attributes although he also has tremendous spring making him a good rebounder."

DON LUND, Michigan
Outfielder hit .240 in a seven-year career (1945, 1947 through 1949 and 1952 through 1954) with the Brooklyn Dodgers, St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers. His only season as a regular was 1953 when he was the Tigers' right fielder. Coached baseball at his alma mater, winning the national championship in 1962, before running the Tigers' farm system until 1970. First-round selection as a fullback/linebacker by the Chicago Bears in the 1945 NFL draft. Rejected $100 a game offer from the Bears and never played pro football. He was a 6-0, 200-pound starting guard as a junior for the Wolverines' basketball team and starting center as a senior. Averaged 4.4 ppg in 46 outings. In his history of Michigan basketball, Jeff Mortimer wrote of the school's World War II squads: "Lund, rejected for military service because of a trick knee, was the mainstay of these teams." Following his playing career, he served as baseball coach for his alma mater (won 1962 College World Series), farm system director for the Tigers and associate athletic director at his alma mater.

DICK SIEBERT, Concordia-St. Paul (Minn.)
Lefthanded first baseman hit .282 with the Brooklyn Dodgers, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Athletics in 11 years in 1932 and from 1936 through 1945. All-Star in 1943 finished among the top Seven in the A.L. in batting average in 1941 and 1944. Minnesota's baseball coach for 31 years (753-361-8 record from 1948 through 1978) captured three CWS titles in a nine-year span from 1956 through 1964. His son, Paul, pitched with the Houston Astros, San Diego Padres and New York Mets for five years from 1974 to 1978. Siebert played two years of college basketball in 1929 and 1930. The March 1929 issue of the Concordia Comet mentions that, "Lefty Siebert, despite having never touched a basketball before enrolling at Concordia, was almost as good a basketball player as he was a baseball player."

JOHN "HI" SIMMONS, Northeast Missouri State
Missouri's all-time winningest baseball coach (481-284 record in 34 years) captured the 1954 NCAA title in one of his six College World Series appearances. One of his winning pitchers at the CWS was Norm Stewart, who went on to become Mizzou's all-time winningest basketball coach. School's baseball stadium is named after Simmons. All-conference center was senior captain of 1927-28 basketball squad.

BOBBY WINKLES, Illinois Wesleyan
Coached Arizona State to College World Series titles in 1965, 1967 and 1969 before managing the California Angels in 1973 and through the first 74 games of 1974 (170-213 major league record). Reggie Jackson, Rick Monday and Sal Bando were among the more than 20 future major leaguers he coached at ASU. Winkles led Illinois Wesleyan in scoring as a senior in 1950-51 (12 ppg). The 5-9, 170-pound guard was a first-team selection in the College Conference of Illinois.

From Hoop Dreams to Field of Dreams: MLB Draft First-Round Selections

Swingman Pat Connaughton, Notre Dame's runner-up in scoring and rebounding last season, was the most notable college basketball player selected in the 2014 MLB Amateur Draft. Connaughton, a pitcher, was picked in the fourth round by the Baltimore Orioles (121st choice overall). The Orioles selected former LSU hoopster Ben McDonald with the first pick in the 1989 draft. McDonald, a pitcher, went on to be in the starting rotation for the Orioles and Milwaukee Brewers.

Infielder-outfielder C.J. Henry, the 17th pick overall in the 2005 draft, hit an anemic .222 in four low-minors seasons in the New York Yankees' farm system before the brother of Kansas standout Xavier Henry averaged 3.1 ppg in 13 contests with the Jayhawks in 2009-10. But North Carolina State's Andrew Brackman, who pitched briefly for the Yankees in 2011, is the only DI basketball regular in the 21st Century to become a major leaguer after being selected in the opening round of the amateur draft.

Lefthanded reliever Matt Thornton of the Yanks averaged 5.8 points and 2.4 rebounds per game for Grand Valley State (MI) from 1995-96 through 1997-98, shooting 54.7% from the floor his last two seasons before becoming a first-round draft choice by the Seattle Mariners. Following is an alphabetical list including Thornton among the major leaguers who were first-round choices in the amateur baseball draft after playing varsity college basketball:

First-Round Choice Position College(s) MLB Team Selector Pick Overall Year
Bill Almon SS Brown San Diego Padres 1st 1974
Andy Benes RHP Evansville San Diego Padres 1st 1988
Andrew Brackman RHP North Carolina State New York Yankees 30th 2007
Tony Clark 1B Arizona/San Diego State Detroit Tigers 2nd 1990
Cameron Drew OF New Haven CT Houston Astros 12th 1985
Atlee Hammaker LHP East Tennessee State Kansas City Royals 21st 1979
Rich Hand RHP Puget Sound WA Cleveland Indians 1st 1969**
Jim Lyttle OF Florida State New York Yankees 10th 1966
Ben McDonald RHP Louisiana State Baltimore Orioles 1st 1989
Dennis Rasmussen LHP Creighton California Angels 17th 1980
Jeff Shaw RHP Rio Grande OH Cleveland Indians 1st 1986**
*Mike Stenhouse OF-1B Harvard Oakland Athletics 26th 1979**
Matt Thornton LHP Grand Valley State MI Seattle Mariners 22nd 1998
Dave Winfield OF Minnesota San Diego Padres 4th 1973
John Young 1B Chapman CA Detroit Tigers 16th 1969**

*Did not sign that year.
**January draft/secondary phase.
NOTE: 1B-OF Rick Leach (13th pick in 1979 by Detroit Tigers) was a JV player for Michigan and OF Ken Singleton (3rd selection in 1967 by New York Mets) was a freshman player for Hofstra.

Brains in the Clouds: Tall Man Bias Impacts Division I Head Coaching Gigs

If not pants on the ground, then it's brains in the clouds. In today's gimme-gimme-gimme culture, it always seems to be discrimination when something isn't handed to you. Numerous All-Americans have dabbled at coaching in the low minors or as an assistant but never been a DI bench boss. In the wake of Patrick Ewing expounding on his belief that employers are biased against tall coaches, following is a list of individuals who might think they deserve to be guiding their alma mater if they weren't so damn tall:

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Headlines in June MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only four percent of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

The St. Louis Cardinals won the World Series 50 years ago with a roster featuring six former college basketball players - Roger Craig, Bob Gibson, Dick Groat, Bobby Humphreys, Ray Washburn and Bill White. The Cards defeated the New York Yankees, a club boasting three pitchers with college hoops connections - Al Downing, Steve Hamilton and Rollie Sheldon.

Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is a June calendar involving such versatile athletes:

JUNE
1 - Chicago White Sox CF Guy Curtright (two-time All-MIAA basketball selection led Northeast Missouri State in scoring each of four seasons in early 1930s) scored four runs in an 11-9 win against the Washington Senators in 1945. . . . Brooklyn Robins 3B Wally Gilbert (captain played for Valparaiso from 1918-19 through 1920-21) stroked four hits in a 10-2 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1930. . . . Cincinnati Reds 1B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) went 5-for-5, including three doubles, against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1931. The previous day against the Cards, Hendrick had four hits in the opener of a doubleheader. . . . Detroit Tigers OF Lynn Jones (averaged 10.4 ppg for Thiel PA from 1970-71 through 1973-74) supplied his second four-hit game against the Milwaukee Brewers in a span of eight days in 1981. . . . OF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV basketball squad with Bloomsburg, PA, three years in mid-1930s) traded by Philadelphia Phillies to St. Louis Cardinals in 1943. . . . Philadelphia Phillies 1B Len Matuszek (starter for Toledo's 18-7 team in 1975-76) failed to notch a putout in a 12-3 defeat against the Chicago Cubs in 1984. . . . St. Louis Cardinals OF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) had his 24-game hitting streak end against the Milwaukee Braves in 1957. . . . Boston Red Sox 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) collected four hits and four RBI in a 13-1 win against the Washington Senators in 1934. . . . OF Lyle Mouton (starter in LSU's backcourt with All-American Chris Jackson for 1989 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Baltimore Orioles to the Milwaukee Brewers in 1999. . . . Washington Senators P Ray Rippelmeyer (led SIU in scoring and rebounding in 1952-53 before transferring and pacing SEMO in scoring in 1953-54 and 1954-55 as All-MIAA first-team choice each year) registered his lone MLB victory (as a reliever against the Minnesota Twins in 1962). . . . New York Giants RF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) went 4-for-4 against the Boston Braves in the opener of a 1930 twinbill. . . . Kansas City Athletics P Dave Thies (two-time all-conference selection finished St. Mary's MN career in 1959 as school's all-time leading scorer) lost his lone MLB decision (against the Washington Senators in 1963). . . . P Bob Veale (scored 1,160 points with Benedictine, KS, from 1955-56 through 1957-58) amassed 16 strikeouts in shutting out the Philadelphia Phillies, 4-0, for the Pittsburgh Pirates' 12th consecutive victory in 1965.
2 - 2B Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's top three scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among the nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Boston Red Sox for reliever Don McMahon in 1967 and wound up playing in the World Series that year against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . In 1951, 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a single season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) demoted by the Boston Red Sox to the minors to regain his form after he was A.L. Rookie of the Year the previous campaign. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) had four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1945. . . . Kansas City Royals DH Gail Hopkins (averaged 2.5 ppg with Pepperdine in 1963-64) went 4-for-4 against the Cleveland Indians in 1973. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as a freshman in 1964-65 and 12.1 ppg as a sophomore in 1965-66) tied a MLB mark by committing three errors in the first inning of a 6-3 setback against the Montreal Expos in 1973. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in the early 1920s) tossed a shutout (6-0 against the Boston Red Sox in opener of a 1940 doubleheader), notching his 225th career victory. . . . Chicago Cubs CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) whacked two homers against the San Francisco Giants in 1979. . . . C Cal Neeman (Illinois Wesleyan's leading scorer in 1947-48 and 1948-49) purchased from the St. Louis Cardinals by the Cleveland Indians in 1963. . . . San Francisco Giants CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) went 3-for-3 with three steals in an 8-6 win against the Chicago Cubs in 1979. . . . Baltimore Orioles LF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) homered in his third consecutive contest in 1987. . . . Atlanta Braves P George Stone (averaged 14.7 ppg and 6.5 rpg for Louisiana Tech in 1964-65 and 1965-66) won his first six decisions in 1969. . . . P Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State, MI, from 1995-96 through 1997-98) selected by Seattle Mariners in first round (22nd pick overall) in 1998 amateur draft.
3 - Chicago Cubs 2B Glenn Beckert (three-year basketball letterman for Allegeny, PA) drove in P Ken Holtzman with the only run of the game in Holtzman's no-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds in 1971. The next year, Beckert banged out four hits against the San Diego Padres in 1972. . . . New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) scored five runs in a 13-8 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1954. . . . OF Cameron Drew (NECC first-team selection in 1984-85 when he led New Haven, CT, in scoring and rebounding) selected by Houston Astros in first round (12th pick overall) in 1985 amateur draft. . . . 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the Detroit Tigers in a nine-player swap in 1952. . . . Overweight P George Earnshaw (competed with Swarthmore, PA, squad in 1922) fined by Philadelphia Athletics owner/manager Connie Mack in 1933. . . . OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Boston Red Sox in a nine-player swap in 1952. . . . New York Giants C Paul Florence (Georgetown letterman from 1920-21 through f1922-23) furnished a career-high three hits in a 10-5 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1926. . . . In 1983, George Bamberger stepped down as manager of the New York Mets and is succeeded by Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when he led Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58). . . . In 1978, Philadelphia Phillies 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) became the first MLB player to hit two pinch-hit grand slams in a single season. . . . P Dave Lemanczyk (participated in NCAA Division II Tournament in 1970 and 1971 with Hartwick, NY) traded by the Toronto Blue Jays to the California Angels in 1980. . . . P Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg in three seasons from 1977-78 through 1979-80) selected in first round (17th pick overall) by the California Angels in 1980 amateur draft.
4 - Chicago Cubs OF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) went 4-for-4 in an 8-5 win against the New York Giants in 1936. . . . Chicago Cubs RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) notched his sixth straight multiple-hit game in 1961. . . . Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32), supported by an inside-the-park homer from player/manager Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) during a 10-run third inning, was the winning pitcher in an 18-9 decision over the Philadelphia Athletics. . . . Seattle Mariners P Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) tossed a two-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers in 1982. . . . 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) selected by the Detroit Tigers in first round (2nd pick overall) in 1990 amateur draft. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) hit for the cycle against the Boston Red Sox in 1952. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 3B Howard Freigau (played for Ohio Wesleyan) collected four hits, four stolen bases and five RBI in a 12-5 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1924. . . . Pinch-hitter Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) hammered a two-out, bases-loaded triple in the ninth inning to spark the Cleveland Indians to an 11-10 verdict over the St. Louis Browns in 1925. Four years later after having his career-high 25-game hitting streak snapped in the final contest of May, 1B Hendrick collected two homers and six RBI for the Brooklyn Robins in an 11-8 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in the nightcap of a 1929 doubleheader. . . . P Jim Konstanty (Syracuse player in late 1930s) signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1956 after he was released by the New York Yankees. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) became the fourth hurler to toss three no-hitters, blanking the N.L.-leading Philadelphia Phillies, 3-0, in 1964. . . . Cleveland Indians 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) had four hits in a 10-2 win against the Boston Red Sox in 1931. . . . 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Pittsburgh Pirates in a 10-player swap in 1953. . . . California Angels 3B John Werhas (USC's leading scorer in 1958-59 and 1959-60) whacked a pinch-hit homer against the Minnesota Twins in 1967. . . . In 1986, New York Yankees OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) homered twice in an 11-0 victory over the California Angels in support of P Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66), who hurled a no-hitter for 7 2/3 innings before yielding a safety. . . . Cleveland Indians 3B Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) went 4-for-4 against the Detroit Tigers in 1922. Eight years later as a Chicago Cubs LF, Stephenson amassed five hits, four runs and four RBI against the Boston Braves in 1930.
5 - In the midst of a career-high 19-game hitting streak, Detroit Tigers LF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) contributed five RBI in a 7-4 win against the Washington Senators in 1950. . . . P Atlee Hammaker (averaged 5.3 ppg as a freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 ppg as a sophomore in 1977-78 under East Tennessee State coach Sonny Smith) selected in first round (21st pick overall) by the Kansas City Royals in 1979 amateur draft. . . . Brooklyn Robins LF Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams winning school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) had four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1938. . . . INF-OF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) purchased from the St. Louis Cardinals by the Cincinnati Reds in 1932. . . . A three-run, pinch-hit homer by Gail Hopkins (averaged 2.5 ppg with Pepperdine in 1963-64) off Lindy McDaniel sparked the Kansas City Royals to an 11-7 triumph against the New York Yankees in 1971. . . . Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) had four hits in a 7-0 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954. . . . P Ben McDonald (started six games as a 6-6 freshman forward for Louisiana State in 1986-87) picked first overall by the Baltimore Orioles in the 1989 amateur draft. . . . Extending his hitting streak to 15 games, St. Louis Browns LF Ray Pepper (Alabama letterman in 1926-27) provided four safeties in a 10-5 win against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1934 doubleheader. . . . Cincinnati Reds RF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) registered two triples among his four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1931. . . . Closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) fans four of the last five Pittsburgh Pirates batters to earn the save for the Chicago Cubs in a 3-1 victory in 1983.
6 - P Mike Barlow (Syracuse substitute from 1967-68 through 1969-70) traded by the Houston Astros to the California Angels in 1976. . . . Cleveland Indians RF Beau Bell (two-year letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) went 4-for-4 in a 5-4 win against the Washington Senators in 1940. . . . P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State, NC, backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Texas Rangers in 1973. . . . San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) stroked a ninth-inning single on a 3-0 delivery to end Tom Browning's bid for a perfect game with the Cincinnati Reds in 1988. . . . OF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV basketball squad with Bloomsburg, PA, three years in mid-1930s) notched the only for the Philadelphia Phillies off Johnny Vander Meer of the Cincinnati Reds in a 1941 outing. . . . P Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) traded by the New York Yankees to the Minnesota Twins in 1987. . . . Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) registered his only victory in 1961 (3-2 at San Francisco). He finished with the worst-ever season record (1-10 in final year with Philadelphia Phillies) for a Hall of Fame pitcher.
7 - SS Bill Almon (averaged 2.5 ppg in half a season for Brown's 1972-73 team ending the Bears' streak of 12 straight losing records) selected first overall in 1974 amateur draft featuring 12 of first 13 choices going on to become major leaguers. . . . Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70 provided four hits in a 5-4 win against the Cleveland Indians in 1981. . . . P Andrew Brackman (averaged 7.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg with North Carolina State in 2004-05 and 2005-06 for pair of NCAA playoff teams) selected in first round (30th pick overall) by the New York Yankees in 2007 amateur draft. . . . OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when he averaged 12.4 ppg) selected in first round (10th pick overall) by the New York Yankees in 1966 amateur draft. . . . New York Giants Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played basketball for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) combined with teammate Joe McGinnity to surrender 11 runs in the opening inning of a 19-0 drubbing by the Chicago Cubs in 1906. It is the worst setback in Giants' history. . . . Len Matuszek (starter for Toledo's 18-7 team in 1975-76) smashed a three-run, pinch-hit homer for the Los Angeles Dodgers against the Houston Astros in 1986. . . . P Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) traded by the New York Yankees to the Minnesota Twins in 1987. . . . In the midst of a 12-game hitting streak, St. Louis Cardinals RF Don Padgett (freshman in 1934 with Lenoir-Rhyne NC excelled in multiple sports) pounded his fourth homer in last six contests. . . . Chicago Cubs P Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps, MS, in late 1920s and early 1930s) hurled a shutout against the Brooklyn Dodgers and supplied a two-run, game-ending homer in the ninth inning in 1946. . . . Detroit Tigers LF Curtis Pride (led William & Mary in steals three times and assists twice while averaging 5.6 ppg and 3.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90) contributed four hits and scored the game-winning run in the bottom of the ninth inning in a 6-5 triumph against the New York Yankees in 1996. . . . OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) picked fourth overall by the San Diego Padres in 1973 amateur draft and goes straight to the majors. . . . 1B Babe Young (Fordham letterman in 1935-36) traded by the New York Giants to the Cincinnati Reds in 1947.
8 - Chicago Cubs RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) went 4-for-4 in a 4-3 loss against the New York Mets in the opener of a 1962 doubleheader. . . . Detroit Tigers P Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first-five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) tossed a one-hitter against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1937. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915) supplied at least three hits for the sixth time in a 13-game span in 1923. . . . Cincinnati Reds CF Harry Craft (four-sport letterman with Mississippi College in early 1930s) went 5-for-5, hitting for the cycle, with six RBI in a 23-2 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1940. . . . Boston Red Sox 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43), en route to becoming 1950 A.L. Rookie of the Year, contributed two homers, seven RBI and five runs scored in a 29-4 romp over the St. Louis Browns in the most lopsided result in the 20th Century. . . . New York Yankees 1B-OF Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams that won a school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) extended his hit streak to 20 games with a pair of singles against the Cleveland Indians in 1942. . . . P Cal Koonce (standout for Campbell in 1960 and 1961 when North Carolina-based school was a junior college) purchased from the New York Mets by the Boston Red Sox in 1970. . . . Bonus baby Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) activated from the injury list by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955. They made room for him by optioning P Tommy Lasorda, who eventually managed them for 21 years from 1976 to 1996. . . . In 1945, Cleveland Indians 2B Dutch Meyer (Texas Christian letterman in 1934-35 and 1935-36) supplied his third three-hit outing in the last four games. . . . P Dennis Rasmussen (sixth-man for Creighton averaged 5.1 ppg in three seasons from 1977-78 through 1979-80) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the San Diego Padres in 1988. . . . Cincinnati Reds 1B Eddie Shokes (Duke letterman in 1939-40 and 1940-41) supplied a career-high three hits against the Boston Braves in 1946.
9 - Chicago Cubs rookie CF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) went 4-for-4 in an 8-4 win against the Cincinnati Reds in 1959. . . . Detroit Tigers LF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) went 5-for-5 against the New York Yankees in 1949. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for UMass' 15-1 freshman basketball squad in 1971-72) shut out the Detroit Tigers in 1984, beating them for the second time in a week. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) had four hits against the Chicago Cubs in 1935. . . . In 2008, Florida Marlins P Mark Hendrickson (two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection paced Washington State in rebounding four straight seasons from 1992-93 through 1995-96) yielded the 600th home run of the career of Ken Griffey Jr. . . . The lone MLB safety for 1B Gary Holle (led Siena in scoring and rebounding in 1974-75)) was a pinch-hit double with the Texas Rangers against the Baltimore Orioles in 1979. . . . OF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg, PA, three years in mid-1930s) purchased from the St. Louis Cardinals by the Boston Braves in 1946. . . . Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) replaced as manager of the Minnesota Twins by Cal Ermer in 1967. . . . Montreal Expos P Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as a Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) hurled the first of his two one-hitters in a month in 1971 (against San Francisco Giants and Philadelphia Phillies). . . . Chicago White Sox P Art Smith (Columbia two-year letterman graduated in 1931) lost his lone MLB decision when dropping debut as a starter against the Washington Senators in 1932.
10 - A pinch-hit single by Houston Colts .45s 2B Joey Amalfitano (played for Loyola Marymount in 1952-53) triggered a 12-game hitting streak for him in 1962. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915) provided four hits for the third time in a 19-game span in 1922. . . . Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) contributed four hits in a 10-5 win against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1946. . . . Chicago Cubs P Mark Freeman (LSU center averaged 3.6 ppg as senior in 1950-51) notched his only MLB complete game with a four-hit, 6-1 win against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1960. . . . P Joe Gibbon (two-time All-SEC forward for Ole Miss was nation's second-leading scorer as a senior in 1956-57) traded by the San Francisco Giants to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1969. . . . Oakland Athletics rookie 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) swatted two homers against the Detroit Tigers in 1977. . . . Philadelphia Phillies CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) went 4-for-4 in a 7-5 triumph against the Atlanta Braves in 1977. . . . Recently-acquired OF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) knocked in six fourth-inning runs (three-run HR and bases-loaded triple) for the Chicago White Sox in a 1952 game at Philadelphia. . . . Boston Braves LF Joe Mowry (Iowa letterman in 1929-30 and 1930-31) went 3-for-3 against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1933. . . . Chicago Cubs SS Paul Popovich (teammate of Jerry West for West Virginia's 1960 NCAA playoff team) smacked a homer in back-to-back games against the San Diego Padres in 1970. . . . P Jeff Robinson (two-time NAIA All-District 3 honoree in early 1980s for Azusa Pacific CA) awarded off waivers from the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Texas Rangers in 1992. . . . Cleveland Indians P Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Missouri in 1957-58 as an All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) hurls no-hitter against the Washington Senators in 1966. . . . 2B Junior Spivey (redshirted his only semester at Northwestern Oklahoma State on a basketball scholarship before transferring to a KS junior college) traded by the Milwaukee Brewers to the Washington Nationals in 2005. . . . Chicago Cubs rookie 2B Jimmy Stewart (All-VSAC selection for Austin Peay's NCAA DII Tournament teams in 1959-60 and 1960-61) stroked four hits against the New York Mets in 1964. . . . INF Gary Sutherland (Southern California's fifth-leading scorer in 1963-64 when averaging 7.4 ppg) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Milwaukee Brewers in 1976.
11 - In 1927, Pittsburgh Pirates LF Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) supplied three extra-base hits against the Brooklyn Robins for his 10th consecutive multiple-hit contest. . . . Hall of Fame C Rick Ferrell (played for Guilford, NC, in mid-1920s) traded with his brother (P Wes Ferrell) from the Boston Red Sox to the Washington Senators in 1937. . . . INF Jerry Kindall (averaged 6.9 ppg for Minnesota in 1955-56) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Minnesota Twins in a three-team swap including the Los Angeles Angels in 1964. . . . Boston Red Sox RF Joe Lahoud (New Haven CT letterman in mid-1960s) smacked three homers against the Minnesota Twins in 1969. . . . OF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV basketball squad with Bloomsburg, PA, three years in mid-1930s) among three St. Louis Cardinals who hit back-to-back-to-back sixth-inning homers in the nightcaqp of a 1944 doubleheader. . . . In 1972, 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) homered for the Cleveland Indians and brother Jim Nettles homered for the Minnesota Twins in the same game. . . . INF Paul Popovich (averaged 3.3 ppg for West Virginia's 1960 NCAA playoff team) wound up with the Chicago Cubs in 1969 after being traded twice on the same day (by the Los Angeles Dodgers and Montreal Expos). . . . In 1961, Boston Red Sox P Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection led Oklahoma in rebounding in 1956-57) won his first five MLB starts, compiling a 1.31 ERA in that span. . . . In his first game with the Milwaukee Brewers, 2B Gary Sutherland (averaged 7.4 ppg with USC in 1963-64) knocked in the go-ahead run against Oakland Athletics P Vida Blue in a 4-2 win in 1976. . . . Boston Red Sox C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) clobbered a ninth-inning grand slam off Satchel Paige to defeat the St. Louis Browns, 11-9, in 1952. White completed his HR trot by rounding third base and crawling from half-way home and kissing the plate.
12 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) had four hits against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the nightcap of a 1953 doubleheader. Ten years later with the Cleveland Indians in 1963, he homered for the fourth time in a five-game span. . . . Eighteen-year-old P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) made his Brooklyn Dodgers debut, striking out the first three New York Giants batters he faced in 1944. . . . A two-run, seventh-inning triple by pinch-hitter Grant Dunlap (Pacific letterman in 1942-43 and 1946-47) proved decisive as the St. Louis Cardinals edged the New York Giants, 3-1, in 1953. . . . San Francisco Giants 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City, CA, club winning 1967 state community college crown) contributed a double and homer in the fourth inning when they scored all of their runs in an 8-5 win over the Cincinnati Reds in 1983. . . . P Johnny Gee (captain of Michigan's 16-4 team in 1936-37) purchased from the Pittsburgh Pirates by the New York Giants in 1944. . . . San Francisco Giants P Ed Halicki (NAIA All-American third-team choice in 1971-72 when leading Monmouth in scoring with 21 ppg after setting school single-game rebounding record with 40 the previous season) hurled a one-hit shutout against the Montreal Expos in 1978. Nine days later, he had a three-hit whitewash against the Cincinnati Reds. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 3B Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) stole second, third and home against the Chicago Cubs in the eighth inning in 1928. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) hammered a grand slam en route to amassing eight RBI in a 20-7 triumph over the Cincinnati Reds in 1949. . . . California Angels DH Joe Lahoud (New Haven CT letterman in mid-1960s) launched two homers against the Detroit Tigers in 1975. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Doc Lavan (played for Hope MI from 1908 through 1910) went 5-for-5 against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1922. . . . C-OF Don Padgett (participated in multiple sports as a freshman for Lenoir-Rhyne, NC, in 1934) purchased from the Brooklyn Dodgers by the Boston Braves in 1946. . . . In the midst of a career-high 16-game hitting streak in 1928, St. Louis Cardinals rookie LF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) supplied his sixth straight multiple-hit outing. . . . An inside-the-park homer by Cincinnati Reds OF Champ Summers (led SIUE in scoring in 1969-70 after doing same with Nicholls State in 1964-65) represented his second pinch-hit round-tripper in less than a month in 1977. Three years later with the Detroit Tigers, Summers smashed two homers against the Minnesota Twins in 1980. . . . Detroit Tigers P Ed Wells (multi-sport athlete graduated in 1924 from Bethany WV) hurled his third straight shutout en route to six complete-game victories during the month in 1926. . . . In 1954, P Jim Wilson (letterman for San Diego State's 1942 NAIA Tournament participant) hurled a no-hitter for the Milwaukee Braves against Hall of Famer Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) and the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . OF-3B Chuck Workman (All-MIAA selection was leading scorer in inaugural NAIA Tournament won by Central Missouri State in 1937) traded by the Boston Braves to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1946.
13 - 2B Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's three leading scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among the nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) traded by the Baltimore Orioles to the Chicago White Sox in 1966. . . . 1B Dale Alexander (starting center in mid-1920s for Milligan, TN) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the Boston Red Sox in 1932. . . . P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State, NC, backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) traded by the Texas Rangers to the Cleveland Indians in 1975. . . . 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City, CA, club winning 1967 state community college crown) traded by the Atlanta Braves to the San Francisco Giants in 1976. . . . Kansas City Royals rookie P Rich Gale (led New Hampshire with 7.2 rpg in 1975-76) hurled a one-hit shutout against the Texas Rangers in 1978. . . . In 1962, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) whacked his first MLB homer (off fellow Hall of Fame lefthander Warren Spahn of the Milwaukee Braves). Koufax went on to collect one more career round-tripper. . . . Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) contributed five RBI in a 12-5 win against the San Francisco Giants in 1960. . . . Philadelphia Phillies 1B Tony Lupien (Harvard captain in 1938-39) had two triples among his four hits against the Boston Braves in the nightcap of a 1944 doubleheader. . . . A grand slam by rookie CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) propelled the Philadelphia Phillies to a 5-1 triumph against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1975. . . . New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) hurled a no-hitter against Chicago in a 1-0 win in 1905. . . . OF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the Washington Senators in 1949. . . . New York Yankees SS Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) pulled hidden-ball trick for the first of two times in a six-week span in 1970. . . . St. Louis Cardinals LF Rip Repulski (started a few games for St. Cloud State, MN) stroked two hits in each game of a 1954 doubleheader sweep against the Pittsburgh Pirates, triggering a streak of 10 consecutive contests with two or more safeties. . . . Philadelphia Phillies Hall of Fame P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) yielded three consecutive triples to INF Danny O'Connell of the Milwaukee Braves in 1956. . . . Boston Red Sox P Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection led Oklahoma in rebounding in 1956-57) tossed a two-hit shutout against the Baltimore Orioles in 1962. . . . P Rollie Sheldon (third-leading scorer as a sophomore for Connecticut's 1960 NCAA Tournament team) traded by the Kansas City Athletics to the Boston Red Sox in a six-player swap in 1966. . . . INF Gary Sutherland (Southern California's fifth-leading scorer in 1963-64 when he averaged 7.4 ppg) purchased from the Montreal Expos by the Houston Astros in 1972. . . . St. Louis Browns rookie SS Herb Upton (All-EIBL first-team selection with Penn in 1945-46 before pacing Southeast Missouri State in scoring three years last half of 1940s and finishing as SEMO's career scoring leader) provided two triples in a 6-1 win against the Washington Senators in the nightcap of a 1950 doubleheader.
14 - LF Babe Barna (West Virginia letterman in 1936 and 1937) traded by the New York Giants to the Boston Red Sox in 1943. . . . Philadelphia Athletics SS Jack Barry (Holy Cross letterman in 1908) banged out four hits against the Chicago White Sox in 1914. . . . SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) traded with three additional players by the New York Giants in 1956 to the St. Louis Cardinals for future Hall of Fame 2B Red Schoendienst and three players. . . . In his final games with the St. Louis Cardinals, CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) went 7-for-8 in a 1931 doubleheader sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies before he was traded to the Cincinnati Reds. . . . 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) traded by the San Diego Padres to the Cleveland Indians in 1979. . . . Boston Bees 1B-OF Buddy Hassett (played for Manhattan teams that won a school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931) fouled out late in a game against the Chicago Cubs after hitting safely in 10 straight at-bats over three contests in 1940. . . . P Roy Parmelee (letterman for Eastern Michigan in 1924-25 and 1925-26) purchased from the Philadelphia Athletics by the Boston Red Sox in 1939. . . . C Hugh Poland (Western Kentucky letterman from 1931-32 through 1933-34) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Cincinnati Reds in 1947. . . . New York Giants P Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence, NY, in early 1930s) hurled a five-hit shutout against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1936. . . . Cincinnati Reds closer Jeff Shaw (freshman guard for 31-5 Rio Grande, OH, team participating in 1985 NAIA Tournament), entering the game with an 0.97 ERA, yielded five runs on seven hits in the ninth and 10th innings as the Houston Astros rallied to win, 6-3, in 1998. . . . Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) whacked two homers in a 9-7 victory against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1926. . . . San Diego Padres P Eric Stults (played for NAIA D-II Tournament runner-up and 2000 NCCAA Tournament titlist with Bethel IN) fired a two-hit complete game in a 2-1 triumph against the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2013.
15 - Los Angeles Angels 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) homered in fourth consecutive contest in 1964. . . . LF Morrie Arnovich (played for Wisconsin-Superior in early 1930s) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Cincinnati Reds in 1940. . . . OF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 points in a career) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the Chicago Cubs in 1949. . . . In 1935, Cleveland Indians 2B Bosey Berger (Maryland's first All-American led Southern Conference in scoring in league competition in 1930-31) had two extra-base hits, triggering a 16-game hitting streak. . . . 1B Donn Clendenon (played for Morehouse, GA) traded by the Montreal Expos to the New York Mets in 1969. . . . Cleveland Indians P Vince Colbert (averaged 14.3 ppg and 7.3 rpg for East Carolina in 1966-67 and 1967-68) tossed a five-hit shutout against the California Angels in 1972. . . . In 1931, the St. Louis Cardinals, in a move making room for Pepper Martin, traded CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) to the Cincinnati Reds for OF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) in a swap one day after Douthit stroked seven straight hits in a doubleheader sweep over the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . San Francisco Giants 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City, CA, club winning 1967 state junior college crown) socked three homers in a 7-1 triumph over the Houston Astros in 1983. . . . Detroit Tigers OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) had his 19-game hitting streak snapped by the Philadelphia Athletics in 1950. . . . C-OF Joe Ferguson (member of Pacific's 1967 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Los Angeles Dodgers to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1976. . . . INF Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" championship squad for Washington College, MD) awarded on waivers from the Brooklyn Robins to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1931. . . . 1B Gary Holle (Siena's scoring and rebounding leader in 1974-75 and 1975-76) traded by the Texas Rangers to the Chicago White Sox in 1979. . . . In 1969, Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Ole Miss from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among the nation's top 45 scorers each year) established a N.L. record with his 54th consecutive errorless contest to start a season. . . . Cleveland Indians 1B Ray Knode (played for Maryland in 1918-19) contributed four hits against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1925. . . . OF Joe Lahoud (letterman for New Haven, CT, in mid-1960s) purchased from the California Angels by the Texas Rangers in 1976. . . . SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) traded by the Milwaukee Braves to the Pittsburgh Pirates for OF Gino Cimoli in 1961. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) notched his ninth straight victory in 1927. His two-run triple in the eighth inning broke a 4-4 deadlock against the Philadelphia Athletics. . . . Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games with Westminster, MO, in 1968-69 and 1969-70) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1977. He went on to hit .339 the remainder of the season for Philly. . . . Chicago White Sox RF Danny Moeller (captain of Millikin IL squad in 1905-06) delivered four hits against the Cleveland Indians in 19114. . . . INF Johnny O'Brien (two-time All-American with Seattle was first college player to crack 1,000-point plateau in a single season when he scored 1,051 in 37 games in 1951-52) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates with 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) to the St. Louis Cardinals for SS Dick Schofield and cash in 1958. . . . P Joe Ostrowski (led Scranton in scoring with 15.1 ppg in 1942-43) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the New York Yankees in 1950. . . . P Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as a Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) traded by the New York Mets to the Montreal Expos in 1969. . . . Detroit Tigers P Jeff Robinson (two-time NAIA All-District 3 honoree in early 1980s left Azusa Pacific CA as school's No. 9 all-time scorer) won his seventh straight decision with a five-hit shutout against the Baltimore Orioles in 1988. . . . OF Richie Scheinblum (averaged 6.1 ppg and 3.6 rpg in 1962-63 and 1963-64 with LIU-C.W. Post) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the California Angels for two players to be designated in 1973. . . . P Don Schwall (All-Big Seven Conference second-team selection as a sophomore in 1956-57 when he led Oklahoma in rebounding) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Atlanta Braves for P Billy O'Dell in 1966. . . . In 1959, Detroit Tigers P Dave Sisler (All-Ivy League second-team selection for Princeton's first NCAA Tournament team in 1952) posted his fourth save in as many relief appearances in a nine-day span. . . . 2B Wayne Terwilliger (two-year letterman for Western Michigan averaged 5.6 ppg in his final season in 1947-48) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Brooklyn Dodgers in an eight-player swap in 1951. . . . 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Kansas City Athletics in 1958. . . . C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48) purchased from the Boston Red Sox by the Milwaukee Braves in 1961.
16 - Philadelphia Phillies OF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) contributed four hits in an 8-3 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1934. . . . In the midst of a 17-game hitting streak, St. Louis Cardinals RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) went 5-for-7 in a 1963 doubleheader split against the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . C Ferrell Anderson (Kansas letterman in 1936-37 and 1937-38) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the St. Louis Browns in 1951. . . . In the midst of a career-high 15-game hitting streak, Chicago Cubs LF Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Buena Vista IA in 1966-67) had four safeties in a 13-inning, 7-6 win against the Houston Astros in 1978. . . . Hitting an anemic .128 entering the contest, Detroit Tigers LF Hoot Evers (Illinois starter in 1939-40) started a streak of seven straight multiple-hit games in 1951. . . . Boston Red Sox rookie P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) lost against the New York Yankees, 3-2, in 1945 after starting his career with eight victories (four of them shutouts). . . . Baltimore Orioles 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) whacked two homers for the second time in first 13 games of the month in 1985. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) had three hits in both ends of a 1946 doubleheader split against the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Andy Karl (Manhattan letterman from 1933 through 1935) surrendered his first run after blanking opponents in previous eight relief appearances in 1946. . . . Light-hitting INF Jerry Kindall (averaged 6.9 ppg for Minnesota in 1955-56) connected for a game-winning two-run homer in the ninth inning to give the Cleveland Indians a 10-9 win over the New York Yankees in 1962. . . . Cleveland Indians rookie 3B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) stroked four extra-base hits in a 9-2 win against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1928.
17 - Milwaukee Brewers rookie P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) scored upon for the only time in his first 14 MLB relief appearances in 2004. . . . Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) swatted two homers in a 5-4 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in the opener of a 1956 twinbill. . . . New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) and C Wes Westrum (played for Bemidji State, MN, one season before serving in military during WWII) each collected four hits in a 1951 game against the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . Boston Red Sox OF Dick Gernert (Temple basketball letterman in 1948-49) walloped two homers in a 17-1 romp over the Detroit Tigers in 1953. . . . Rookie Wynn Hawkins (Baldwin-Wallace's all-time leading scorer upon graduation in 1957) yielded Boston Red Sox Hall of Famer Ted Williams' 500th home run (fourth player in MLB history to reach that plateau) at Cleveland in 1960. . . . In 1965, Chicago Cubs P Bobby Humphreys (four-year letterman graduated from Hampden-Sydney VA in 1958) yielded his only run in last 11 relief appearances of the month. . . . Chicago White Sox C Duane Josephson (led Northern Iowa in scoring in 1962-63 and 1963-64 under coach Norm Stewart) went 4-for-4 and scored three runs in a 6-3 win against the New York Yankees in 1970. . . . Chicago Cubs SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Ole Miss from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) went 6-for-6 in a 10-inning, 7-6 win over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1971. . . . Milwaukee Brewers OF Joe Lahoud (letterman in mid-1960s for New Haven, CT) contributed a grand slam en route to six RBI in a 15-5 rout of the Chicago White Sox in 1973. . . . Starting P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) scored the winning run in the 15th inning to give the Philadelphia Phillies a 3-2 decision over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1954. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) left 13 runners stranded in a 1951 doubleheader against the Boston Braves. . . . C John Stephenson (scored 1,361 points for William Carey, MS, in early 1960s) shipped from the New York Mets to the Chicago Cubs in 1967 as the player to be designated, completing an earlier deal that month.
18 - Pittsburgh Pirates RF Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) had five RBI against the Boston Braves in 1923. . . . Cincinnati Reds rookie RF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 points in a career) collected four hits and 1B Babe Young (Fordham letterman in 1935-36) contributed a pair of three-run homers to support teammate Ewell Blackwell's no-hitter against the Boston Braves in 1947. . . . 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) and OF Dick Gernert (Temple letterman in 1948-49) whacked the only homers for the Boston Red Sox while tallying 17 runs in the seventh inning of a 23-3 rout of the Detroit Tigers in 1953. . . . Chicago White Sox P Jim Geddes (averaged 2.7 ppg for Ohio State from 1967-68 through 1969-70 under coach Fred Taylor) held the California Angels hitless for 4 2/3 innings but walked six in his 1973 debut. In his next appearance, he held the Texas Rangers scoreless in 4 1/3 innings in the opener of a July 4 doubleheader. . . . Brooklyn Robins 3B Wally Gilbert (captain played for Valparaiso from 1918-19 through 1920-21) went 4-for-4 and scored three runs in an 8-7 win against the New York Giants in the opener of a 1929 doubleheader. . . . Cleveland Indians P Oral Hildebrand (Butler All-American in 1928-29 and 1929-30) hurled back-to-back shutouts in 1933. . . . In 1962, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) outdueled St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57). It marked the third time Koufax won a game, 1-0, on a Tommy Davis homer. . . . Spoiling the MLB debut of Hall of Fame P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47), the Pittsburgh Pirates edged the Philadelphia Phillies, 2-0, in 1948. . . . Arizona Diamondbacks rookie 2B Junior Spivey (redshirted his only semester at Northwestern Oklahoma State on a basketball scholarship before transferring to a KS junior college) had five hits in a 14-5 thrashing of the Houston Astros in 2001. . . . In 1986, San Diego Padres P Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) slugged his first and only MLB homer. He appeared in another 128 games but never had another at-bat. . . . C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) tied a MLB record by scoring three runs in one inning when the Boston Red Sox tallied 17 in the seventh against the Detroit Tigers in 1953.
19 - Detroit Tigers 1B Dale Alexander (starting center in mid-1920s for Milligan, TN) had a 29-game hitting streak snapped by the New York Yankees in 1932. Two years later, Alexander was with the Boston Red Sox when he went 4-for-4 against the Cleveland Indians in the opener of a doubleheader. . . . Cleveland Indians P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) tossed a four-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers in the nightcap of a 1977 twinbill. . . . Chicago Cubs 1B Larry Biittner (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Buena Vista IA in 1966-67) went 4-for-4 in the nightcap of a 1976 doubleheader against the Atlanta Braves. . . . New York Giants OF Hoot Evers (starter for Illinois in 1939-40) climaxed a four-run, ninth-inning rally with a pinch-hit homer against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1954. . . . 3B Gene Freese (captain of 1952 NAIA Tournament team for West Liberty WV) went 7-for-8, sparking the Cincinnati Reds to a 1961 twinbill sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) yielded his only run in an 11-game stretch of relief appearances in 1979.
20 - Boston Red Sox 1B Dale Alexander (starting center in mid-1920s for Milligan, TN) contributed four hits in a 9-5 win against the Cleveland Indians in 1933. . . . P Bob Chlupsa (led Manhattan in rebounding in 1965-66 and 1966-67) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the San Diego Padres in 1972. . . . 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) clobbered two of Detroit's team-record eight homers in the Tigers' 18-6 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays in 2000. . . . Hall of Fame C Mickey Cochrane (Boston University player in early 1920s) collected four of the Philadelphia Athletics' 26 hits in an 18-11 decision over the Chicago White Sox in 1932. . . . Lone MLB triumph for Paul Edmondson (averaged 12.4 ppg and 6.6 rpg with Cal State Northridge from 1962-63 through 1964-65) came in his debut in 1969 when he hurled a two-hitter for the Chicago White Sox against the California Angels. . . . P Ed Halicki (NAIA All-American third-team choice in 1971-72 when leading Monmouth in scoring with 21 ppg after setting school single-game rebounding record with 40 the previous season) awarded on waivers from the San Francisco Giants to the California Angels in 1980. . . . In 1961, Baltimore Orioles rookie RF Earl Robinson (three-time All-PCC second-team selection for California under coach Pete Newell from 1955-56 through 1957-58) ripped first MLB homer, which was among his three hits against the Minnesota Twins. . . . Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) preserved the California Angels' 3-2 verdict over the Kansas City Royals in 1995, setting a MLB mark with his 18th save in 18 opportunities (record subsequently broken).
21 - Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) and LF Carson Bigbee (letterman with his brother on Oregon's squad in 1915) combined for nine hits against the Brooklyn Robins in 1922. . . . P Walt Huntzinger (All-EIBL second-five selection in 1921-22 with Penn) awarded on waivers from the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs in 1926. . . . Washington Senators CF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) smashed two homers against the Kansas City Athletics in the opener of a 1964 doubleheader. . . . Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) notched his 250th career win in 1942. He will finish the season hurling complete games in all 20 starts, lead the A.L. with a 2.10 ERA, and then enter the U.S. Marine Corps at age 42. . . . As a pinch-hitter, New York Mets C John Stephenson (scored 1,361 points for William Carey, MS, in early 1960s) was the final out of P Jim Bunning's perfect game for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1964. . . . Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) supplied four hits against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1932. . . . In 1973, San Diego Padres OF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) whacked his first of 465 MLB homers (off Ken Forsch of the Houston Astros).
22 - San Diego Padres P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) surrendered his only run (against the Tampa Bay Rays) in a span of 20 relief appearances from mid-May to early July in 2010. . . . OF Billy Cowan (co-captain of Utah's 1960 NCAA playoff team) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1966. . . . Cleveland Indians OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) homered in both ends of a 1953 doubleheader against the Washington Senators. . . . SS Dick Groat (NCAA unanimous first-team All-American for Duke in 1951-52 when he was runner-up in the nation in scoring) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the San Francisco Giants in 1967. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates 3B Lee Handley (Bradley letterman from 1932-33 through 1934-35) had four hits against the New York Giants in 1939. . . . In 2003, Mark Hendrickson (two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection paced Washington State four straight seasons in rebounding from 1992-93 through 1995-96) became the first Toronto Blue Jays pitcher to hit a home run (against the Montreal Expos). . . . Setting a new record for a night game, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) fanned 16 Philadelphia Phillies in a 6-2 triumph in 1959. . . . P Dave Leonhard (averaged 4.8 ppg with Johns Hopkins, MD, in 1961-62), joining the Baltimore Orioles on a weekend leave from the National Guard, tossed a three-hit shutout against the Cleveland Indians in the nightcap of a 1969 doubleheader. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates rookie 2B Johnny O'Brien (consensus All-American second-team choice as junior and consensus first-team selection as senior averaged 25.8 ppg for Seattle from 1950-51 through 1952-53) had back-to-back three-hit outings to cap off a nine-game hitting streak in 1953. . . . In 1944, Pittsburgh Pirates INF Al Rubeling (played for Towson in early 1930s) ripped his second pinch-hit homer in last four games. . . . In 1982, St. Louis Cardinals P John Stuper (two-time all-conference junior college player in mid-1970s for Butler County PA) surrendered Pete Rose's 3,772nd career hit. The third-inning double moved Rose past Hank Aaron into second place on MLB's all-time list. . . . Chicago White Sox RF Evar Swanson (played all five positions for Knox IL) had four hits against the Boston Red Sox in 1934. . . . Chicago White Sox rookie P Billy Wynne (one of prime Pfeiffer NC players in mid-1960s) hurled his lone MLB shutout (1-0 against the California Angels in 1969).
23 - Pittsburgh Pirates RF Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) went 4-for-4 against the Cincinnati Reds in 1923. . . . St. Louis Browns RF Beau Bell (two-year letterman for Texas A&M in early 1930s) banged out four hits in a 6-3 win against the New York Yankees in 1937. . . . Cincinnati Reds 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named state's Mr. Basketball) went 4-for-4 with four RBI in a 5-3 victory against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the opener of a 1957 doubleheader. . . . SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) traded by the Philadelphia Phillies to the Milwaukee Braves in 1960. . . . OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist), retired from the Cleveland Indians, joined P Don Newcombe in 1962 as the first former MLB players to compete for a Japanese team. Doby's season batting average overseas will be a modest .225. . . . 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) and C Sammy White (All-PCC Northern Division first-five selection for Washington in 1947-48 and 1948-49) both homer when 12 consecutive Boston Red Sox players reach base in an 11-run, fourth-inning outburst at Detroit in 1952. Seven years later, Dropo was traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the Baltimore Orioles. . . . INF Howard Freigau (played for Ohio Wesleyan) purchased from the Brooklyn Robins by the Boston Braves in 1928. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) went 5-for-5 against the Boston Braves in 1930. . . . New York Mets OF Jimmy Piersall celebrated by running around the bases backwards in 1963 after the free spirit hit the 100th homer of his MLB career and only one in the N.L. The round-tripper was yielded by the Philadelphia Phillies' Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55). . . . Cleveland Indians rookie 2B Jack Hammond (four-year letterman for Colgate from 1909-10 through 1912-13) had a career-high three hits against the Chicago White Sox in the nightcap of a 1915 doubleheader. . . . Boston Red Sox rookie P Herb Hash (three-year letterman averaged 6.4 ppg as junior center for Richmond's undefeated team in 1934-35) hurled his lone MLB shutout (2-0 against the Cleveland Indians in 1940). . . . Chicago Cubs INF-OF Harvey Hendrick (Vanderbilt letterman in 1918) hammered a game-winning, pinch-hit grand slam in the 10th inning against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1933 doubleheader. . . . P Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage as a Portland freshman in 1975-76) traded by the Oakland Athletics to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1987. . . . OF Sam Mele (NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs) purchased from the Boston Red Sox by the Cincinnati Reds in 1955. Six years later, Mele became manager of the Minnesota Twins. . . . Boston Red Sox 1B Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) collected three hits and scored four runs in a 10-2 win against the Chicago White Sox in 1934. . . . Jim Riggleman (two-year letterman for Frostburg State, MD, averaged 7.2 ppg in early 1970s) resigned as Washington Nationals manager in 2011 on the heels of them winning 11 of 12 games when the franchise failed to give him a contract extension. . . . P Garry Roggenburk (led Dayton in scoring all three seasons from 1959-60 through 1961-62 and grabbed a school-record 32 rebounds in his third varsity game en route to pacing the Flyers in rebounding his first two years) purchased from the Boston Red Sox by the Seattle Pilots in 1969.
24 - INF-OF Leo Burke (averaged 9.2 ppg for Virginia Tech in 1952-53 and 1953-54) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs for P Barney Schultz in 1963. . . . Detroit Tigers P Ownie Carroll (Holy Cross letterman in 1922), hurling his second shutout, allowed a total of four earned runs in his first eight victories of the 1928 campaign en route to leading the team with 16 triumphs. . . . Boston Braves SS Dick Culler (#9 jersey retired by High Point for Little All-American in 1935 and 1936) went 6-for-7 in a 1945 doubleheader split against the Brooklyn Dodgers. . . . 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 ppg in 1942-43) awarded on waivers from the Chicago White Sox to the Cincinnati Reds in 1958. . . . New York Yankees reliever Steve Hamilton (Morehead State's leading scorer and rebounder in 1956-57 and 1957-58) struck out Cleveland Indians 1B Tony Horton with a couple of "Folly Floaters" in the nightcap of a 1970 doubleheader. . . . Philadelphia Athletics 1B Tom Hamilton (member of Texas' 1947 Final Four team was SWC's leading scorer in league competition in 1949-50) supplied a career-high two hits in a 6-3 setback against the Detroit Tigers in 1953. . . . In 1958, New York Yankees INF Jerry Lumpe (member of Southwest Missouri State's 1952 NAIA Tournament championship team) hit his first big league homer (at Chicago off Early Wynn of the White Sox). . . . New York Yankees RF Bud Metheny (William & Mary letterman from 1935-36 through 1937-38) amassed two homers and six RBI in a 13-5 win against the Philadelphia Athletics in the opener of a 1945 twinbill. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) powered a grand slam in back-to-back innings (fifth and sixth) against the Cleveland Indians in 1968. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1911-12 and 1913-14) went into the eighth inning with a perfect game but wound up losing to the Pittsburgh Pirates, 4-3, in 1924. . . . In 1947, Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) swiped home in the fifth inning against the Pittsburgh Pirates. It was the first of 19 times in his career that he pilfered home. . . . New York Giants C Wes Westrum (played for Bemidji State, MN, one season before serving in military) had a career game, hitting three homers plus a triple and scoring five runs in a 12-2 triumph against the Cincinnati Reds in 1950. . . . In 1991, California Angels RF-DH Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) went 5-fot-5 against the Kansas City Royals and became the oldest player in MLB history to go for the cycle (39).
25 - Oakland A's rookie P Mark Acre (played in 1990 NCAA Tournament with New Mexico State) earned his third relief victory in 11 days in 1994. . . . Houston Astros rookie C Mark Bailey (led Southwest Missouri State in rebounding and field-goal shooting in 1980-81) blasted two homers in an 8-5 win against the Atlanta Braves in 1984. . . . New York Giants 2B Andy Cohen (Alabama letterman in 1924 and 1925) had four hits and scored three runs in a 12-4 triumph against the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1928 doubleheader. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City, IN, in 1947 and 1948) went for the cycle (including two homers) in a 17-10 triumph at Pittsburgh in 1949. . . . Philadelphia Phillies CF Don Lock (led Wichita State in field-goal percentage in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Ralph Miller) went 6-for-8, homering in both ends of a 1967 twinbill sweep against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) went 4-for-4 in a 5-4 loss against the Philadelphia Phillies in 1963. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (competed for Washington College, MD, in mid-1930s) purchased from the Washington Senators by the Chicago Cubs for $35,000 in 1939. . . . Baltimore Orioles DH Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) hammered two homers against the California Angels in 1989. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers P Eric Stults (played for NAIA D-II Tournament runner-up and 2000 NCCAA Tournament titlist with Bethel IN) fired a four-hit shutout against the Chicago White Sox in 2008. . . . New York Yankees OF-DH Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) stroked five singles against the Detroit Tigers in 1984. It was one of three five-hit games for Winfield this month, tying a mark set by Ty Cobb.
26 - OF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) purchased from the New York Yankees by the Houston Colt .45's in 1962. . . . Brooklyn Robins 2B Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" basketball championship squad for Washington College MD) contributed four hits against the Boston Braves in the opener of a 1928 doubleheader. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) hurled his fifth consecutive shutout (3-0 against the Pittsburgh Pirates) in the opener of a 1968 doubleheader. . . . San Francisco Giants P Ed Halicki (NAIA All-American third-team choice in 1971-72 when leading Monmouth in scoring with 21 ppg after setting school single-game rebounding record with 40 the previous season) hurled a five-hit shutout against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1975. Two years later, he tossed his second shutout of the month that season. . . . In 1966, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) matched his N.L. record of seven straight strikeouts in back-to-back nine-inning appearances en route to a 2-1 victory at Atlanta. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B-OF Rick Leach (averaged 15.5 ppg for Michigan's JV squad in 1975-76), mired in a 3-for-35 nosedive, broke up a no-hit bid by Baltimore's Storm Davis with a ninth-inning homer in 1983. . . . Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) had his second 14-game hitting streak of the 1958 campaign. . . . Oakland Athletics CF Billy North (played briefly for Central Washington in 1967-68) stole three bases against the California Angels in 1974. . . . P Paul Reuschel (Western Illinois' leading rebounder in 1966-67 with 15.2 per game) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Cleveland Indians in 1978.
27 - INF Jack Barry (letterman for Holy Cross in 1908) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the Philadelphia Athletics in 1919. . . . Seattle Mariners 1B Bruce Bochte (starting forward for Santa Clara's NCAA playoff team in 1969-70 supplied his ninth multiple-hit outing during an 11-game hitting streak in 1979. . . . 2B Marv Breeding (played for Samford in mid-1950s) traded by the Houston Astros to the Chicago Cubs in 1967. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City, CA, club winning 1967 state community college crown) registered his 2,000th career hit with a first-inning, two-run homer against the Baltimore Orioles in 1987. . . . San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) went 3-for-4 against the Atlanta Braves, raising his batting average in 1987 to .387 en route to finishing at .370. . . . P Mark Hendrickson (two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection paced Washington State four straight seasons in rebounding from 1992-93 through 1995-96) traded by the Tampa Devil Rays to the Los Angeles Dodgers in a five-player swap in 2006. . . . In the midst of a career-high 14-game hitting streak, Chicago Cubs CF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring the previous season) smashed a homer in four consecutive contests in 1979. . . . Cleveland Indians 2B Dutch Meyer (Texas Christian letterman in 1934-35 and 1935-36) collected four hits against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1945. . . . 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) belted a 14th-inning, two-run homer to give the New York Yankees a 6-4 victory over the Boston Red Sox in 1978. . . . Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State, MI, from 1995-96 through 1997-98) made his MLB debut in 2004, pitching four scoreless innings of relief with the Seattle Mariners against the San Diego Padres.
28 - Chicago Cubs RF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) furnished five extra-base hits, including a homer in each game, in a 1961 doubleheader split against the Cincinnati Reds. . . . Detroit Tigers P Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first-five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) won for the fifth time in as many decisions during the month in 1934. . . . In the midst of a career-high 23-game hitting streak, Pittsburgh Pirates LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915) went 7-for-10 against the Chicago Cubs in a 1921 twinbill. . . . Brooklyn Robins 3B Wally Gilbert (captain played for Valparaiso from 1918-19 through 1920-21) supplied four hits in a 10-4 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1931. . . . First MLB victory for Philadelphia Phillies rookie P Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) was a three-hit shutout against the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1960. . . . LF Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary HBCU coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Cleveland Indians in 1968. . . . In 1951, New York Giants OF Monte Irvin (played basketball for Lincoln, PA, 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) swatted two homers off Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) in same game. . . . Toronto Blue Jays P Dave Lemanczyk (averaged 4.5 ppg and 3.5 rpg for Hartwick NY teams compiling 51-21 record from 1969-70 through 1971-72) posted his fifth triumph of the month in 1977. . . . OF Don Lund (two-year starter for Michigan in mid-1940s) awarded on waivers from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the St. Louis Browns in 1948. . . . New York Yankees SS Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) pulled hidden-ball trick against the Cleveland Indians in 1969. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Dick Ricketts (Duquesne's all-time leading scorer was second-team consensus All-American choice as junior in 1953-54 and first-five consensus selection as senior in 1954-55) registered his lone MLB victory (against the Cincinnati Reds in 1959). . . . Cincinnati Reds P Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1912 and 1914) banged out four hits, including a homer and two doubles, in a 5-2 triumph over the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of a 1924 doubleheader. . . . Chicago Cubs SS Roy Smalley Jr. (one of top scorers for Drury, MO, in 1942-43 and 1943-44) went for the cycle in a 15-3 romp over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1950. . . . In 2014, San Diego Padres P Eric Stults (played for NAIA D-II Tournament runner-up and 2000 NCCAA Tournament titlist with Bethel IN) lost for the sixth time in as many starts during the month. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Champ Summers (led SIUE in scoring in 1969-70 after doing same with Nicholls State in 1964-65) socked a homer in his third consecutive contest in 1979. . . . Chicago White Sox P Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) posted his third relief victory during a span going unscored upon in last 12 appearances of the month in 2008.
29 - Milwaukee Braves 1B Joe Adcock (Louisiana State's leading scorer in 1945-46) smashed two homers in a 3-1 win against the Chicago Cubs in the nightcap of a 1960 twinbill. . . . P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) secured his first win with the Texas Rangers by hurling a one-hit shutout against the Kansas City Royals in 1973. . . . New York Giants 2B Andy Cohen (Alabama letterman in 1924 and 1925) had an 11-game hitting streak snapped by the Philadelphia Phillies in the opener of a 1929 twin bill. . . . Boston Red Sox rookie P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) contributed a run-scoring single and two-run, ninth-inning homer in a 4-2 decision over the Chicago White Sox in 1945. . . . Washington Senators SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) had three hits for the third consecutive contest in 1940. . . . OF David Justice (led Thomas More, KY, in assists in 1984-85), acquired by the New York Yankees from the Cleveland Indians in 2000, went on to become the first player to collect more than 50 RBI in a single season with two different clubs. . . . OF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) homered in the nightcap of a 1941 doubleheader sweep of the Washington Senators by the New York Yankees, extending the Bronx Bombers' streak to a MLB-record 25 consecutive contests with a round-tripper. . . . In 1931, Philadelphia Phillies rookie RF Fred Koster (four-year starting forward from 1923-24 through 1926-27 was Louisville's leading scorer as sophomore and senior) contributed three hits for the second time in three games. . . . Cleveland Indians rookie CF Ed Morgan (Tulane letterman from 1923-24 through 1925-26) had his fifth outing of the month with at least three hits in his last 13 games. . . . Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma, MI, in 1958-59) set a MLB mark with his third grand slam in a week in 1968. . . . Chicago Cubs 2B Paul Popovich (teammate of Jerry West for West Virginia's 1960 NCAA playoff team) scored four runs against the St. Louis Cardinals in the nightcap of a 1969 twinbill. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) finished the month with 10 consecutive scoreless relief appearances. Five years later in 1987 with the New York Yankees, Stoddard allowed his only earned run in a 14-game span until mid-July.
30 - Cincinnati Reds LF Morrie Arnovich (played for Wisconsin-Superior in early 1930s) went 4-for-4 in a 7-6 win against the Chicago Cubs in the nightcap of a 1940 doubleheader. . . . Chicago Cubs CF Frankie Baumholtz (MVP in 1941 NIT and first player in Ohio University history to score 1,000 career points) had four hits against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1953. . . . In 1960, Detroit Tigers 2B Frank Bolling (averaged 7.3 ppg for Spring Hill, AL, in 1950-51) had a streak of seven straight two-hit games, with an extra-base safety in all but one of them, halted when he went hitless against the Boston Red Sox. . . . In 1978, Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) became the second black MLB manager, succeeding Bob Lemon as skipper of the Chicago White Sox. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 3B Jake Flowers (member of 1923 "Flying Pentagon" championship squad for Washington College MD) closed out the month with five straight multiple-hit games in 1932. . . . In 1940, Washington Senators SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s for Lebanon Valley PA) closed out the month hitting .474 in 11 games (18-of-38). . . . San Diego Padres OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) and two teammates each socked a three-run homer in a 15-6 rout of the Oakland A's in 1997. . . . Commencing the game by fanning the side on nine pitches in the opening inning, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) hurled a no-hitter against the New York Mets in 1962. . . . Minnesota Twins P Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage as freshman en route to averaging 5.1 ppg for Portland from 1975-76 through 1979-80) tossed a two-hit shutout against the California Angels in 1992. . . . In 1938, New York Giants OF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) launched the final homer at Philadelphia's Baker Bowl before the Phillies moved to Shibe Park. . . . In the midst of a 10-game hitting streak, Philadelphia Athletics C Ed Madjeski (Seton Hall letterman from 1928-29 through 1930-31) had five safeties in a 1933 doubleheader split against the St. Louis Browns. . . . P Nels Potter (leading scorer during two years he attended Mount Morris, IL, in early 1930s) purchased from the Philadelphia Athletics by the Boston Red Sox in 1941. . . . Baltimore Orioles LF Larry Sheets (All-ODAC selection in 1981-82 and 1982-83 with Eastern Mennonite VA) collected four RBI while triggering a career-high 10-game hitting streak in 1987. . . . New York Mets P George Stone (averaged 14.7 ppg and 6.5 rpg for Louisiana Tech in 1964-65 and 1965-66) hurled his final MLB complete game when defeating the Chicago Cubs, 5-1, in 1975. . . . OF Kite Thomas (averaged 5.1 ppg for Kansas State in 1946-47) awarded on waivers from the Philadelphia Athletics to the Washington Senators in 1953. . . . Seattle Mariners P Matt Thornton (averaged 5.8 ppg and 2.4 rpg for Grand Valley State MI from 1995-96 through 1997-98) charged with a run for the first time in last 14 relief appearances in 2005.

MLB achievements in May by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in April by former college basketball players

Former College Hoopster Koufax Hurled MLB No-Hitter Four Years in a Row

In the aftermath of no-hitters for the Los Angeles Dodgers by Josh Beckett and Clayton Kershaw plus the San Francisco Giants by Tim Lincecum, it's time to take a look at ex-college hoopsters who went on to hurl a no-no at the major-league level. Brooklyn native Sandy Koufax attended Cincinnati one year on a combination baseball/basketball scholarship under coach Ed Jucker in both sports before signing a pro baseball contract. Koufax was the third-leading scorer with 9.7 ppg for the Bearcats' 12-2 freshman squad in 1953-54 before hurling no-hitters in four straight seasons the first half of the 1960s.

Two former Bucknell products - Bob Keegan and Christy Mathewson - are among the following former college basketball players who went on to toss a MLB no-hitter (listed in reverse order):

Date No-Hit Pitcher Team Opponent Score Basketball College
5-14-1977 Jim Colborn Kansas City Royals Texas Rangers 6-0 Whittier CA
8-24-1975 Ed Halicki San Francisco Giants New York Mets 6-0 Monmouth NJ
7-30-1973 Jim Bibby Texas Rangers Oakland A's 6-0 Fayetteville State NC
8-14-1971 Bob Gibson St. Louis Cardinals Pittsburgh Pirates 11-0 Creighton
9-18-1968 Ray Washburn St. Louis Cardinals San Francisco Giants 2-0 Whitworth WA
6-10-1966 Sonny Siebert Cleveland Indians Washington Senators 2-0 Missouri
9-9-1965 Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers Chicago Cubs 1-0* Cincinnati
6-4-1964 Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers Philadelphia Phillies 3-0 Cincinnati
5-11-1963 Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers San Francisco Giants 8-0 Cincinnati
6-30-1962 Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers New York Mets 5-0 Cincinnati
8-20-1957 Bob Keegan Chicago White Sox Washington Senators 6-0 Bucknell
6-12-1954 Jim Wilson Milwaukee Braves Philadelphia Phillies 2-0 San Diego State
9-3-1947 Bill McCahan Philadelphia Athletics Washington Senators 3-0 Duke
8-21-1926 Ted Lyons Chicago White Sox Boston Red Sox 6-0 Baylor
5-5-1917 Ernie Koob St. Louis Browns Chicago White Sox 1-0 Western Michigan
6-13-1905 Christy Mathewson New York Giants Chicago Cubs 1-0 Bucknell
7-15-1901 Christy Mathewson New York Giants St. Louis Cardinals 5-0 Bucknell

*Perfect game.

A Few Good Men: Gonzaga Guru Makes Mark Among Conference Dominators

The principal reason Jerry Tarkanian became a Hall of Famer is the fact he is the only coach in NCAA Division I history to win more than 90% of his assignments for a school in a single conference including both regular season and postseason league tourney (229-19 mark in PCAA/Big West with UNLV in 10-year span from 1982-83 through 1991-92).

Among active coaches, Gonzaga's Mark Few is expected to extend his stunning string of 15 consecutive NCAA playoff appearances in as many seasons with the Zags. But what is equally impressive is his domination of the West Coast Conference not only in regular-season competition (198-24) but also in league tournament action (30-4). Several touted transfers from Kentucky, Southern California and Vanderbilt means Few won't transfer from list of league rulers anytime soon.

Brad Stevens won 80.8% of Butler's Horizon League games in five seasons but fell just short of meeting the minimum of 100 decisions in a single conference on the following list before subsequently moving on to the Atlantic 10 and NBA's Boston Celtics. Stevens aspires to have a better pro career than Tarkanian, who compiled a 9-11 record in a brief stint with the San Antonio Spurs at the start of the 1992-93 campaign. Few ranks third, also behind North Carolina State's Everett Case, among the following coaches who have won more than 75% of their games in a single conference including participation in league tourney play:

Coach School Conference Seasons Regular-Season League Tourney Overall Pct.
Jerry Tarkanian UNLV PCAA/Big West 1983-92 205-17 24-2 229-19 .923
Everett Case North Carolina State Southern 1947-53 87-11 20-1 107-12 .899
Mark Few Gonzaga West Coast 2000-14 198-24 30-4 228-28 .891
Adolph Rupp Kentucky SEC 1933-72 397-75 57-6 454-81 .849
Roy Williams Kansas Big 12 1997-2003 94-18 14-4 108-22 .831
Bill Self Kansas Big 12 2004-14 151-23 22-5 173-36 .828
Gregg Marshall Winthrop Big South 1999-2007 104-24 19-2 123-26 .826
John Calipari Memphis C-USA 2001-09 117-25 17-5 134-30 .817
Rick Majerus Utah Western Athletic 1991-99 118-30 15-6 133-36 .787
Eddie Sutton Arkansas Southwest 1975-85 139-35 13-7 152-42 .784
Bob Huggins Cincinnati C-USA 1996-2005 123-33 16-6 139-39 .781
Pete Gillen Xavier Midwestern Collegiate 1986-94 83-25 17-4 100-29 .775
Vic Bubas Duke ACC 1960-69 106-32 22-6 128-38 .771
Stew Morrill Utah State Big West 1999-2005 91-28 13-3 104-31 .770
Charlie Spoonhour SW Missouri State Mid-Continent 1984-90 73-21 9-4 82-25 .766
Lute Olson Arizona Pacific-10 1984-2007 328-102 16-6 344-108 .761
Joe Williams Furman Southern 1971-78 67-25 18-3 85-28 .752
Denny Crum Louisville Metro 1977-95 173-59 33-9 206-68 .752

NOTES: Calipari (Kentucky), Huggins (West Virginia), Marshall (Wichita State) and Williams (North Carolina) are active coaches now at other schools. . . . UCLA's John Wooden won 81% of his games in the PCC/AAWU/Pacific-8 from 1949-75 but none of those contests included conference tournament competition.

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