Welcome to CollegeHoopedia.com: Home for College Hoops History

Welcome to CollegeHoopedia.com! This tell-it-like-it-is treasure trove of facts, statistical analysis and edgy opinion is unique because it catalogs the matchless performances of uncommon participants. Much of this dig-deep information you can't find anywhere else among banal boosterism couldn't have been assembled without securing input from a variety of old-school basketball resources and passionate fans. We offer a hearty thank-you for visiting this salient site and seeking to enhance your contemporary and historical perspectives of college hoops plus possibly know more about us as a fiercely independent voice you can trust. We devoutly study the sport and will be chafed to the point of enemies-list snarky whenever our ideals are threatened. Unflinchingly, there will be no mercy on anyone we believe is violating the game's integrity. Someone needs to exhibit the intestinal fortitude expressing utter contempt for chronically clueless characters. Click here if you want to follow our incisive information and unvarnished truth on Twitter where we reject the simplistic church of group-think embracing sacred cows like so many of the embellishing follow-the-pack national and local media predictably trivializing verifiable truth and contrary creativity. Unabashedly, we aspire to be a three-dimensional "player" - respecting life lessons from the past, portraying the present with pithy posturing and keeping a keen eye on the future!

Oh Canada: Pangos Prime Pick to Continue North-of-Border All-Americans

Canada's recent basketball bounty has gone from Syracuse's Kris Joseph (Quebec) to Gonzaga's Kelly Olynyk (British Columbia) to three All-Americans last season in Iowa State's Melvin Ejim (Toronto), Michigan's Nik Stauskas (Ontario) and Kansas' Andrew Wiggins (Ontario). The next Canadian likely to earn All-American status and show the nation is more than a hockey hotbed probably is Gonzaga guard Kevin Pangos (Ontario).

Foreigners have been much more than bit players in a modern-day immigrant version of "Coming to America." Following is an alphabetical list of hoop princes of sorts as the first 21 All-Americans who spent most or all of their formative years in a country outside mainland U.S.:

Foreigner Pos. College Native Country Year(s) All-American NBA Draft Status
Andrew Bogut* C Utah Australia 2005 1st pick overall by Milwaukee
Kresimir Cosic C Brigham Young Yugoslavia 1972 and 1973 66th by L.A. Lakers
Tim Duncan* C Wake Forest Virgin Islands 1995 through 1997 1st by San Antonio
Melvin Ejim F Iowa State Toronto, Ontario 2014 undrafted
Patrick Ewing* C Georgetown Jamaica 1982 through 1985 1st by New York
Adonal Foyle C Colgate West Indies 1997 8th by Golden State
Al Horford F-C Florida Dominican Republic 2007 3rd by Atlanta
Kris Joseph F Syracuse Quebec 2012 51st by Boston
Dikembe Mutombo C Georgetown Zaire 1991 4th by Denver
Eduardo Najera F Oklahoma Mexico 2000 38th by Houston
Hakeem Olajuwon C Houston Nigeria 1983 and 1984 1st by Houston
Kelly Olynyk C Gonzaga British Columbia 2013 13th by Dallas
Juan "Pepe" Sanchez G Temple Argentina 2000 undrafted
Detlef Schrempf F Washington Germany 1985 8th by Dallas
Rony Seikaly C Syracuse Greece 1988 9th by Miami
Doron Sheffer G Connecticut Israel 1996 36th by L.A. Clippers
Nik Stauskas G Michigan Ontario 2014 8th by Sacramento
Hasheem Thabeet C Connecticut Tanzania 2009 2nd by Memphis
Mychal Thompson F-C Minnesota Bahamas 1977 and 1978 1st by Portland
Greivis Vasquez G Maryland Venezuela 2010 28th by Memphis
Andrew Wiggins G-F Kansas Ontario 2014 1st by Cleveland

*Named National Player of the Year.

Grant's Army: Marching Up Legacy List Concerning First Families of Hoops

"You don't choose your family. They are God's gift to you, as you are to them." - Desmond Tutu

At first glance to God-fearing fans, it appeared as if Grant's Army was retreating after Jerian Grant exited Notre Dame midway through last season because of academic shortcomings. But Jerian's departure was somewhat offset in the giving Grant household by the emergence of brother Jerami as Syracuse's leading rebounder. Combined with older brother Jerai, the leading rebounder for Clemson's 2011 NCAA playoff team, and father Harvey, an All-American for Oklahoma's 1988 NCAA Tournament runner-up, the "College Grants" rank among the top five hoop families in NCAA annals regarding a legacy list; especially since Jerian followed through on his promise to return to the Irish and youngest son Jaelin is comparable to his brothers when he leaves high school in the near future.

Elsewhere, it seems somewhat ridiculous for a power conference school such as Indiana to offer a scholarship to an eighth-grader (Eron Gordon) several years ago. But that is before examining his family tree. His father, Eric Sr., averaged 14.1 points per game with Liberty from 1981-82 through 1983-84, leading the Flames in scoring as a senior with 18.1 ppg before the school moved up to the NCAA Division I level later in the decade. Oldest brother Eric Jr. led the Big Ten Conference in scoring as a freshman All-American in his lone season with IU in 2007-08 before moving on to the NBA. Older brother Evan was named to the Big South Conference All-Freshman team with Liberty in 2009-10 before becoming an all-league second-team selection as a sophomore prior to transferring to Arizona State and moving on again to Eric Jr.'s old stomping grounds with the Hoosiers. If Eron lives up to billing, the Gordons could become one of the most influential families in college basketball history.

Hoopdom's "Focus on the Family" will also concentrate on the Plumlees if youngest brother Marshall Plumlee finally overcomes his foot problems and improves as much as Duke siblings Mason and Miles. They could combine with their father, former Tennessee Tech frontcourter Perky, to comprise one of the all-time premier family units. Mason became the Blue Devils' go-to plumb line to keep them on the straight and narrow two seasons ago after forgoing leaving school early for the NBA.

Until we have a final reading on the Gordons and Plumlees, following are a dynamic dozen nuclear-power families. The "HoopDaddys" comprised of college players who had at least three sons also go on to compete in a significant way at a similar level include:

BARRY BARRY GOOD
1. Barry - Father Rick Barry, a first-team All-American as a senior when he led the nation in scoring, averaged 29.8 ppg and 16.5 rpg for Miami (FL) from 1962-63 through 1964-65. Son Scooter averaged 3.3 ppg for Kansas' 1988 NCAA titlist before leading the Jayhawks with 5.7 apg the next season. Son Jon, a junior college transfer, averaged 14.4 ppg, 3.6 rpg and 4.5 apg for Pacific and Georgia Tech in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Son Brent averaged 12.1 ppg, 3.7 rpg and 3.3 apg for Oregon State from 1991-92 through 1994-95. Son Drew, an All-ACC second-team selection as a senior, averaged 10.7 ppg, 4.1 rpg and 6.2 apg for Georgia Tech from 1992-93 through 1995-96, leading the ACC in assists each of his last three seasons. Son Canyon, a redshirt freshman for the College of Charleston, was averaging 9.4 ppg and 2.7 rpg in the Cougars' debut season in the CAA before being sidelined with a finger injury. Jon, an All-ACC third-team selection as a junior in 1991-92, and Brent, an All-Pacific-10 Conference choice as a senior, were late bloomers who went on to have productive NBA careers. Rick, Jon and Brent were NBA first-round draft choices while Drew was a second-round pick. Bruce Hale, Rick's father-in-law and a Santa Clara alumnus, coached him at Miami (FL) after playing five years in the NBA.

WALTON MOUNTAIN GANG
2. Walton - Father Bill Walton, a three-time national player of the year, averaged 20.3 ppg and 15.7 rpg for UCLA from 1971-72 through 1973-74. Son Adam lettered with LSU before incurring a rest-of-season suspension in Dale Brown's final year as coach in 1996-97 and subsequently transferring to a small college in California. Son Nate was an All-Ivy League first-team selection for Princeton as a senior in 2000-01, becoming the fourth player in school history with two seasons of at least 100 assists. Son Luke, a two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference choice, averaged 9.1 ppg, 5.1 rpg and 4.5 apg for Arizona from 1999-2000 through 2002-03. Son Chris finished among the top 15 in the Mountain West Conference in assists and rebounding as a junior in 2003-04 for San Diego State, finishing his four-year career with averages of 5.1 ppg and 3.4 rpg.

PRICE IS RIGHT CONTROL
3. Price - Father Dennis Price, an All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection as a junior, averaged 10.9 ppg for Oklahoma from 1957-58 through 1959-60. Son Mark, a three-time All-ACC first-team selection and All-American, averaged 17.4 ppg and 4 apg for Georgia Tech from 1982-83 through 1985-86. Son Matt scored 23 points in 18 games as a freshman for Appalachian State in 1984-85. Son Brent, an All-Big Eight Conference first-team selection as a senior, averaged 18 ppg and 5.8 apg for Oklahoma in 1990-91 and 1991-92 after transferring from South Carolina, where he averaged 12.6 ppg and 3.5 apg in 1987-88 and 1988-89.

GRANT'S ARMY MARCHES ON
4. Grant - Father Harvey Grant was an All-American in 1988 as the leading rebounder and second-leading scorer for Oklahoma's NCAA Tournament runner-up. Eldest son Jerai was the leading rebounder for Clemson's 2011 NCAA playoff squad. Jerian was Notre Dame's leader in scoring average each of the last three campaigns. Emerging standout Jerami was the leading rebounder for Syracuse's inaugural ACC club in 2013-14.

HIGH ON HAARLOW
5. Haarlow - Father Bill Haarlow Jr., a three-time All-Western Conference selection for the University of Chicago from 1933-34 through 1935-36, was the league's third-leading scorer as a sophomore (9.9 ppg), leading scorer as a junior (13) and second-leading scorer as a senior (12.6). He had three sons play for Princeton in the 1960s - A. William III averaged 10.8 ppg and 5 rpg in 1962-63, Bob averaged 8.5 ppg and 4.4 rpg from 1963-64 through 1965-66 (second-leading scorer for the Tigers' 1965 Final Four team as a teammate of All-American Bill Bradley) and John averaged 12.6 ppg and 7.3 rpg from 1965-66 through 1967-68 (All-Ivy League second-team selection as a junior). With Bill Jr. cited on CollegeHoopedia.com's comprehensive list of all-time All-Americans, the Haarlows might have been the initial most impactful family on the sport.

PATERNO INFLUENCE
6. Paterno - Father Bill Paterno averaged 3.4 ppg with St. Francis (N.Y.) in 1948-49 and 1949-50 after scoring 18 points in nine games in 1947-48. Son Billy averaged 9.8 ppg and 4.7 rpg for Notre Dame from 1973-74 through 1976-77 under coach Digger Phelps, finishing team runner-up in scoring to All-American Adrian Dantley as a sophomore with 13.3 ppg. Son Mike averaged 3.1 ppg for Monmouth in 1987-88. Son Joe averaged 14.6 ppg and 5.1 rpg with Fordham from 1985-86 through 1988-89, leading the Rams in scoring in three seasons and finishing his career as their all-time second-leading scorer. Son Steve averaged 10.8 ppg and 3.6 rpg with Marist from 1987-88 through 1990-91, leading the Red Foxes in scoring as a junior before finishing runner-up as a senior.

TOASTING THE RAIVIOS
7. Raivio - Father Rick Raivio, a three-time All-WCAC selection who led Portland in field-goal shooting all four seasons, finished as the Pilots' all-time leading rebounder (910/9.4 rpg) while averaging 17.2 ppg before becoming a fifth-round draft choice by the Los Angeles Lakers. Son Derek, the WCC co-player of the year as a Gonzaga senior (18 ppg and nation-leading 96.1 FT%), averaged 11.5 ppg and 2.8 apg while shooting 41.6% from beyond the arc from 2003-04 through 2006-07 with Gonzaga en route to becoming the #2 all-time free-throw shooter in DI history (92.7%). Son Nik, a J.C. recruit, was an All-WCC selection as a junior with Portland in 2008-09 when he averaged 16 ppg and 6.5 rpg before heading overseas to play professionally after finishing his Pilots' career with 14.3 ppg and 5.3 rpg. Son Matt averaged 9.4 ppg, 2.8 rpg and 2.8 apg for Simon Fraser (Vancouver) in 2011-12 and 2012-13 after transferring from Santa Rosa (CA) JC.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH
8. Pollard - Father Pearl Pollard (6-9), a second-team All-Skyline Conference choice as a senior, averaged 10.5 ppg and 7.9 rpg for Utah from 1956-57 through 1958-59 with three national postseason tournament teams, leading the Utes in scoring and rebounding as a senior. Son Carl, 7-2, played briefly for BYU as a freshman in 1983-84 before redshirting in 1984-85, going on a two-year Mormon mission and transferring with a brother to Southern California, where he didn't play prior to competing with Southern Utah in 1989-90 and averaging 1.5 ppg and 2.9 rpg. Son Alan, 6-9, averaged 5.6 ppg and 5.3 rpg while splitting four seasons between Brigham Young and USC from 1984-85 through 1988-89, leading BYU in rebounding as a freshman. Son Mark, 6-11, played briefly for San Diego State in 1990-91 before also leaving at the same time with a brother. Son Neal, 7-0, redshirted at San Diego State in 1988-89 before going on a Mormon mission to New England, playing three games with the Aztecs in 1991-92 and transferring to Utah State, where he didn't play. Son Scot, 6-11, averaged 9.4 ppg, 6.6 rpg and 1.7 bpg for four Kansas teams reaching NCAA playoff regional semifinals from 1993-94 through 1996-97 before becoming an NBA first-round draft choice.

CAN'T FOIL THE DOYLES
9. Doyle - Father Dan Doyle averaged 13.7 ppg and 12.2 rpg for Belmont Abbey (N.C.) in his four-year career. He was selected by the Detroit Pistons in 5th round of 1961 NBA draft (44th pick overall) after pacing Al McGuire-coached teams in scoring average his final three seasons and rebounding as a junior and senior. Son Danny averaged 7.4 ppg and 2.1 rpg with Iona from 1989-90 through 1993-94, leading the Gaels in assists and steals as a senior. Son Joe led then-DII Sacred Heart in scoring, assists and steals as a senior in 1996-97. Son Tim played sparingly for St. John's in 2002-03 before transferring to Northwestern, where he averaged 8.1 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 3.7 apg and 1.3 spg from 2004-05 through 2006-07, leading the Wildcats in assists his last two seasons and in steals as a senior.

HUGGY BEARS ALL
10. Huggins - Father Charlie Huggins was an All-WVIAC first-team selection for Alderson-Broaddus (W. Va.) in 1957-58 after transferring from West Virginia. Son Bob averaged 8.4 ppg and 2.8 rpg while shooting 45.9% from the floor and 79.4% from the free-throw line with West Virginia in the mid-1970s after transferring from Ohio University. Son Harry was a two-year letterman for Texas Lutheran in the late 1970s after transferring from Rice. Son Larry averaged 5.6 ppg, 2 rpg and 2.1 apg while shooting 46.3% from the floor and 79.3% from the free-throw line as a captain for Ohio State in the early 1980s.

WE AND PAPA McGEE
11. McGee - Father Anthony McGee led Long Beach State in scoring in 1975-76 with 14.8 ppg before contributing 4.5 ppg for the 49ers' NCAA playoff team the next season. Son Tony averaged 4 ppg for Eastern Washington in 1997-98 and 1998-99. Son Antoine averaged 1.4 ppg and 1.7 apg with Colorado from 2002-03 through 2005-06. Son Andre averaged 5.2 ppg and 1.8 apg while shooting 36.5% from beyond the arc with Louisville from 2005-06 through 2008-09, leading the Cardinals in three-point field-goal shooting as a junior (39.4%).

FIFE AND DRUM CORPS
12. Fife - Father Dan Fife, a 10th-round draft choice by the Milwaukee Bucks before pitching briefly for the Minnesota Twins, averaged 12.6 ppg and 4.9 rpg for Michigan from 1968-69 through 1970-71. Son Dugan, overlooked during the Fab Five era, averaged 4.6 ppg and 2 rpg for Michigan from 1992-93 through 1995-96. Son Jeremy led Grand Valley State (MI) in assists in 1996-97 and 1997-98. Son Dane averaged 5.6 ppg, 2.6 rpg, 2.3 apg and 1.4 spg while shooting 38.2% from three-point range for Indiana from 1998-99 through 2001-02 before becoming a DI head coach with IUPU-Fort Wayne.

HONORABLE MENTION
Christensen - Father Harold, a member of Brigham Young's 1951 NIT championship team, averaged 7.8 ppg and 4.4 rpg. He was chosen by the Minneapolis Lakers in 1953 NBA draft before having three sons play for the Cougars - Craig averaged 5.1 ppg in half a season in 1981-82, Kurt averaged 4.5 ppg in 1992-93 and 1993-94, and Todd averaged 5.8 ppg in 1995-96, 1998-99 and 1999-00.

Winter Blunderland: Saint Joseph's Jolted by Most-Lopsided Loss in History

Here is a hoop tidbit if you need to win a bar bet: Centre College in Danville, Ky., boasts a distinction that could probably render Dickie V speechless. Centre clobbered both Kentucky (87-17 in 1909-10) and Louisville (61-7 in 1919-20) by more than 50 points, handing each perennial power its most-lopsided defeat in history. Additional major universities succumbing by staggering record-setting margins in the Dinosaur Age against obscure opponents include Bradley (bowed to Millikin), Cincinnati (Circleville), Connecticut (Wesleyan), Duke (Washington & Lee), Massachusetts (Williams), North Carolina (Lynchburg YMCA Elks), Oklahoma State (Southwestern KS), Rhode Island (Amherst), USC (L.A. Athletic Club) and Wichita State (Ottawa).

Returning from the time tunnel, Saint Joseph's, trailing 48-10 at halftime, suffered its most-lopsided loss in school annals early this season when the Hawks were humbled at Gonzaga, 94-42. Their previous worst setback was 123-79 under legendary coach Jack Ramsay against Cincinnati in 1959-60 and they had been one of five DI schools reaching the NCAA playoff national semifinals at some point in their careers to win at least 20 games in a major-college season when suffering their most-lopsided setback. After the St. Joe's blowout under all-time winningest coach Phil Martelli, the "Final Four" left standing in this category are Indiana (1993-94), St. John's (1951-52), Texas-El Paso (2000-01) and UCLA (1996-97). Kentucky was the opponent when Florida, Georgia, St. John's, Temple, Tennessee, Tennessee-Martin, Tulsa and Vanderbilt were saddled with their worst reversals.

Meanwhile, Kansas' anemic 12-point second half resulted in a 72-40 rout by Kentucky. However, it didn't come close to the all-time worst loss for the Jayhawks. Dr. James Naismith founded the game of basketball but he apparently didn't boast any "inside" information gaining a competitive edge. In fact, Naismith is the only one of KU's first nine full-season head coaches to compile a career losing record (55-60 in nine campaigns from 1898-99 through 1906-07). One of the defeats was by an all-time high 40 points against Nebraska.

Naismith is among the following coaches, including a striking number of luminaries (such as Harold Anderson, Gene Bartow, Ben Carnevale, Gale Catlett, Chick Davies, Bill Foster, Marv Harshman, Doggie Julian, Bob Knight, Guy Lewis, Rick Majerus, Frank McGuire, Shelby Metcalf, Lute Olson, Johnny Orr, Vadal Peterson, Digger Phelps, Honey Russell, Norm Stewart and Dick Vitale) incurring the most-lopsided loss in history for a Division I university (info unavailable for some DI schools listed alphabetically below):

Losing DI School Season Record Coach Victorious Opponent Score Margin
Air Force 1965-66 14-12 Bob Spear Utah 108-57 51
Alabama 1997-98 15-16 David Hobbs Auburn 94-40 54
Alabama State 1996-97 8-21 Rob Spivery Minnesota 114-34 80
American 1964-65 4-19 Jimmy Williams Syracuse 127-67 60
Appalachian State 1972-73 6-20 Press Maravich North Carolina State 130-53 77
Arizona 1955-56 11-15 Fred Enke Utah 119-45 74
Arizona State 1955-56 10-16 Bill Kajikawa Texas Tech 113-63 50
Arkansas 1973-74 10-16 Lanny Van Eman Mississippi 117-66 51
Army 1913-14 5-7 Joseph Stilwell Union 81-13 68
Auburn 1912-13 6-9 Mike Donahue Georgia 92-12 80
Austin Peay 1981-82 6-20 Ron Bargatze Clemson 102-53 49
Ball State 1946-47 9-8 Pete Phillips Notre Dame 80-31 49
Ball State 1987-88 14-14 Rick Majerus Purdue 96-47 49
Baylor 1944-45 0-17 Van Sweet Arkansas 94-28 66
Bethune-Cookman 1991-92 4-25 Cy McClairen Arkansas 128-46 82
Boston College 1955-56 6-18 Don Martin Marshall 130-69 61
Boston University 1905-06 2-4 unavailable Wesleyan 74-7 67
Bowling Green 1954-55 6-16 Harold Anderson Dayton 109-38 71
Bradley 1913-14 10-10 Fred Brown Millikin 62-10 52
Brigham Young 1996-97 1-25 Roger Reid Washington 95-44 51
Brown 1988-89 7-19 Mike Cingiser Kansas 115-45 70
Butler 1954-55 10-14 Tony Hinkle Illinois 88-34 54
California 1999-00 18-15 Ben Braun Stanford 101-50 51
UC Irvine 1975-76 14-12 Tim Tift UNLV 129-57 72
UC Santa Barbara 1966-67 10-16 Ralph Barkey UCLA 119-75 44
UC Santa Barbara 1976-77 8-18 Ralph Barkey UNLV 113-69 44
Cal State Fullerton 1964-65 1-25 Alex Omalev U.S. International 91-32 59
Campbell 1997-98 10-17 Billy Lee Florida International 96-43 53
Centenary 1987-88 13-15 Tommy Canterbury Oklahoma 152-84 68
Central Connecticut 1995-96 13-15 Mark Adams Connecticut 116-46 70
Central Florida 1988-89 7-20 Phil Carter Florida State 133-79 54
Central Michigan 1911-12 2-5 Harry Helmer Michigan State 72-10 62
Cincinnati 1901-02 5-4 Henry S. Pratt Circleville 84-13 71
Clemson 1954-55 2-21 Banks McFadden Duke 115-54 61
Colorado 1951-52 8-16 Bebe Lee Kansas State 92-40 52
Connecticut 1905-06 6-3 unofficial Wesleyan 86-12 74
Creighton 1948-49 9-14 Duce Belford Illinois 96-30 66
Dartmouth 1966-67 7-17 Doggie Julian Princeton 116-42 74
Davidson 1908-09 1-3 J.W. Rhea Georgia 100-12 88
Dayton 1994-95 7-20 Oliver Purnell Cincinnati 116-63 53
Detroit 1962-63 14-12 Bob Calihan Western Michigan 110-67 43
Detroit 1973-74 17-9 Dick Vitale Southern Illinois 95-52 43
Detroit 1980-81 9-18 Willie McCarter Iowa 98-55 43
Drake 1998-99 10-17 Kurt Kanaskie Indiana 102-46 56
Duke 1912-13 11-8 J.E. Brinn Washington & Lee 90-15 75
Duquesne 1937-38 6-11 Chick Davies Stanford 92-27 65
East Carolina 1963-64 9-15 Wendell Carr Davidson 105-45 60
East Tennessee State 1996-97 7-20 Ed DeChellis Davidson 97-47 50
East Tennessee State 2007-08 19-13 Murry Bartow Syracuse 125-75 50
Eastern Illinois 2001-02 15-16 Rick Samuels Oklahoma 109-50 59
Eastern Michigan 1957-58 1-20 James Skala Southern Illinois 128-60 68
Evansville 1960-61 11-16 Arad McCutchan Utah 132-77 55
Fairfield 1949-50 5-16 Bob Noonan Holy Cross 89-43 46
Florida 1947-48 15-10 Sam McAllister Kentucky 87-31 56
Florida A&M 1992-93 10-18 Willie Booker Oklahoma 146-65 81
Florida Atlantic 2000-01 7-24 Sidney Green Florida 100-42 58
Florida International 1989-90 7-21 Rich Walker Ball State 105-50 55
Florida State 1957-58 9-16 J.K. Kennedy West Virginia 103-51 52
Fordham 1908-09 17-12 Chris Mahoney Williams 77-12 65
George Mason 1970-71 9-17 John Linn Randolph-Macon 118-36 82
George Washington 1961-62 9-15 Bill Reinhart West Virginia 120-68 52
Georgetown 1912-13 11-5 James Colliflower Navy 67-18 49
Georgia 1955-56 3-21 Harbin Lawson Kentucky 143-66 77
Georgia State 1994-95 11-17 Carter Wilson Memphis State 124-52 72
Georgia Tech 1908-09 1-6 John Heisman Georgia 78-9 69
Gonzaga 1945-46 6-14 Gordon White Montana 103-34 69
Grambling State 1999-00 1-30 Larry Wright Louisiana State 112-37 75
Harvard 1989-90 12-14 Peter Roby Duke 130-54 76
Hawaii 1965-66 0-18 Red Rocha Washington 111-52 59
Hofstra 1969-70 13-13 Paul Lynner St. Joseph's 98-57 41
Holy Cross 1901-02 4-5 Fred Powers Dartmouth 78-27 51
Houston 1975-76 17-11 Guy Lewis Arkansas 92-47 45
Howard 2000-01 10-18 Frankie Allen Memphis 112-42 70
Idaho 1976-77 5-21 Jim Jarvis UNLV 135-78 57
Idaho State 1992-93 10-18 Herb Williams Oklahoma 112-59 53
Illinois 1973-74 5-18 Harv Schmidt Indiana 107-67 40
Illinois State 1958-59 24-4 James Collie Tennessee State 131-74 57
Indiana 1993-94 21-9 Bob Knight Minnesota 106-56 50
Indiana State 1910-11 2-8 John P. Kimmel Purdue 112-6 106
Iona 1967-68 13-9 Jim McDermott Duquesne 100-47 53
Iowa 1974-75 10-16 Lute Olson Indiana 102-49 53
Iowa State 1989-90 10-18 Johnny Orr Indiana 115-66 49
Jacksonville 1988-89 14-16 Rich Haddad South Alabama 105-59 46
James Madison 1977-78 18-8 Lou Campanelli Utah State 102-66 36
Kansas 1899-00 3-4 Dr. James Naismith Nebraska 48-8 40
Kansas State 1945-46 4-20 Fritz Knorr Marshall 88-42 46
Kentucky 1909-10 4-8 R.E. Spahr/E.R. Sweetland Centre 87-17 70
Lafayette 1994-95 2-25 John Leone Connecticut 110-48 62
Lamar 1963-64 19-6 Jack Martin St. Louis 113-63 50
La Salle 1945-46 9-14 Joe Meehan CCNY 94-52 42
Lehigh 1901-02 9-5 J.W. Pollard Bucknell 68-3 65
Long Beach State 1990-91 11-17 Seth Greenberg UNLV 114-63 51
Long Island 1998-99 10-17 Ray Martin Florida 119-61 58
Louisiana-Monroe 1997-98 13-16 Mike Vining Xavier 118-61 57
Louisiana Tech 1974-75 12-13 Emmett Hendricks Tulane 88-40 48
Louisville 1919-20 6-5 Tuley Brucker Centre 61-7 54
Loyola of Chicago 1916-17 1-3 unavailable Whiting Owls 91-21 70
Loyola Marymount 1990-91 16-15 Jay Hillock Oklahoma 172-112 60
Maine 1973-74 13-10 Skip Chappelle Massachusetts 108-38 70
Manhattan 1985-86 2-26 Thomas Sullivan North Carolina 129-45 84
Marquette 2004-05 19-12 Tom Crean Louisville 99-52 47
Marshall 1913-14 2-6 Boyd Chambers Cincinnati Church of Christ 68-10 58
Maryland 1943-44 4-14 H. Burton Shipley Army 85-22 63
Massachusetts 1907-08 4-11 unofficial Williams 60-3 57
Memphis 1927-28 10-11 Zach Curlin Elks Club 79-30 49
Miami 1969-70 9-17 Ron Godfrey UCLA 127-69 58
Miami (Ohio) 1948-49 8-13 Blue Foster Cincinnati 94-36 58
Michigan 1999-00 15-14 Brian Ellerbe Michigan State 114-63 51
Michigan State 1974-75 17-9 Gus Ganakas Indiana 107-55 52
Middle Tennessee State 1954-55 11-16 Charles Greer Morehead State 123-68 55
Milwaukee 1962-63 4-17 Russ Rebholz Loyola of Chicago 107-47 60
Minnesota 1991-92 16-16 Clem Haskins Indiana 96-50 46
Mississippi 1913-14 8-7 B.Y. Walton Mississippi State 84-18 66
Mississippi State 1992-93 13-16 Richard Williams Arkansas 115-58 57
Missouri 1997-98 17-15 Norm Stewart Kansas State 111-56 55
Missouri State 1980-81 9-21 Bob Cleeland Puget Sound 103-50 53
Morehead State 1992-93 6-21 Dick Fick Michigan State 121-53 68
Murray State 1960-61 13-10 Cal Luther St. Bonaventure 92-39 53
Navy 1963-64 10-12 Ben Carnevale Duke 121-65 56
Nebraska 1957-58 10-13 Jerry Bush Kansas 102-46 56
Nevada 1990-91 17-14 Len Stevens UNLV 131-81 50
New Mexico 1954-55 7-17 Woody Clements UCLA 106-41 65
New Orleans 2001-02 15-14 Monte Towe Oklahoma State 95-47 48
NYU 1912-13 1-11 James Dale Navy 74-13 61
Niagara 1996-97 11-17 Jack Armstrong Kansas 134-73 61
Nicholls State 2002-03 3-25 Ricky Blanton Texas Tech 107-35 72
North Carolina 1914-15 6-10 Charles Doak Lynchburg YMCA Elks 63-20 43
UNC Asheville 1997-98 19-9 Eddie Biedenbach Maryland 110-52 58
North Carolina A&T 1976-77 3-24 Warren Reynolds North Carolina State 107-46 61
North Carolina State 1920-21 6-14 Richard Crozier North Carolina 62-10 52
UNC Wilmington 1996-97 16-14 Jerry Wainwright Villanova 87-38 49
North Texas 1998-99 4-22 Vic Trilli Maryland 132-57 75
Northern Arizona 1991-92 7-20 Harold Merritt Louisiana State 159-86 73
Northern Illinois 1966-67 8-12 Tom Jorgensen Bradley 117-66 51
Northern Iowa 1906-07 5-4 R.f. Seymour Iowa 73-16 57
Northwestern 1986-87 7-21 Bill Foster Duke 106-55 51
Northwestern State 2000-01 19-13 Mike McConathy Arkansas 115-47 68
Notre Dame 1971-72 6-20 Digger Phelps Indiana 94-29 65
Ohio 1902-03 TBD unavailable Ohio State 88-2 86
Ohio State 1955-56 16-6 Floyd Stahl Illinois 111-64 47
Oklahoma State 1919-20 1-12 James Pixlee Southwestern KS 53-9 44
Oral Roberts 1992-93 5-22 Ken Trickey Kansas 140-72 68
Oregon 1921-22 7-24 George Bohler Washington 76-15 61
Oregon State 1996-97 7-20 Eddie Payne Arizona 99-48 51
Oregon State 2009-10 14-18 Craig Robinson Seattle 99-48 51
Pacific 1952-53 2-20 Van Sweet California 87-30 57
Penn 1987-88 10-16 Tom Schneider UCLA 98-49 49
Penn State 1985-86 12-17 Bruce Parkhill Navy 103-50 53
Pepperdine 1965-66 2-24 Robert Dowell Iowa 111-50 61
Portland 1966-67 10-16 Al Negratti UCLA 122-57 65
Portland State 1964-65 8-18 Sharkey Nelson Montana State 97-43 54
Prairie View 1995-96 4-23 Elwood Plummer Tulsa 141-50 91
Princeton 1908-09 8-13 Harry Shorter Penn 55-10 45
Providence 1954-55 9-12 Vin Cuddy Holy Cross 101-47 54
Purdue 1947-48 11-9 Mel Taube Illinois 98-54 44
Rhode Island 1916-17 2-6 Jim Baldwin Amherst 65-5 60
Rice 1971-72 6-20 Don Knodel North Carolina 127-69 58
Rider 1989-90 10-18 Kevin Bannon Minnesota 116-48 68
Robert Morris 1996-97 4-23 Jim Boone Arizona 118-54 64
Rutgers 1906-07 0-3 Frank Gorton Lehigh 88-23 65
St. Francis (N.Y.) 1993-94 1-26 Ron Ganulin Providence 108-48 60
St. John's 1951-52 25-6 Frank McGuire Kentucky 81-40 41
Saint Joseph's 2014-15 TBD Phil Martelli Gonzaga 94-42 52
Saint Louis 1945-46 13-11 John Flanigan Oklahoma A&M 86-33 53
Saint Mary's 2000-01 2-27 Dave Bollwinkel Arizona 101-41 60
Saint Peter's 1941-42 5-11 Morgan Sweetman St. Francis (N.Y.) 85-29 56
Sam Houston State 1991-92 2-25 Jerry Hopkins Lamar 126-57 69
Samford 1957-58 7-17 Virgil Ledbetter Alabama 105-44 61
San Diego State 1998-99 4-22 Fred Trenkle Utah 86-38 48
San Jose State 1970-71 2-24 Danny Glines New Mexico State 114-55 59
Santa Clara 2001-02 13-15 Dick Davey Ohio State 88-41 47
Seton Hall 1957-58 7-19 Honey Russell Cincinnati 118-54 64
Siena 1987-88 23-6 Mike Deane Syracuse 123-72 51
South Alabama 1994-95 9-18 Ronnie Arrow Southern Utah 140-72 68
South Carolina 1929-30 6-10 A.W. Norman Furman 70-11 59
South Florida 1987-88 6-22 Bobby Paschal Syracuse 111-65 46
Southeastern Louisiana 1998-99 6-20 John Lyles Auburn 114-60 54
Southern California 1913-14 5-7 unavailable L.A. Athletic Club 77-14 63
Southern Illinois 1980-81 7-20 Joe Gottfried West Texas State 97-57 40
Southern Methodist 1980-81 7-20 Dave Bliss Arkansas 92-50 42
Southern Mississippi 2001-02 10-17 James Green Cincinnati 89-37 52
Southern Utah 1988-89 10-18 Neil Roberts Oklahoma 132-64 68
Stetson 1993-94 14-15 Dan Hipsher Florida 90-44 46
Syracuse 1961-62 8-13 Fred Lewis NYU 122-59 63
Temple 1946-47 8-12 Josh Cody Kentucky 68-29 39
Tennessee 1992-93 13-17 Wade Houston Kentucky 101-40 61
Tennessee-Martin 1994-95 7-20 Cal Luther Kentucky 124-50 74
Tennessee Tech 1962-63 16-8 John Oldham Loyola of Chicago 111-42 69
Texas 1971-72 19-9 Leon Black UCLA 115-65 50
Texas A&M 1971-72 16-10 Shelby Metcalf UCLA 117-53 64
Texas-Arlington 1993-94 7-22 Eddie McCarter Iowa State 119-55 64
Texas Christian 1977-78 4-22 Tim Somerville Clemson 125-62 63
Texas-El Paso 2000-01 23-9 Jason Rabedeaux Fresno State 108-56 52
Texas-San Antonio 1996-97 9-17 Tim Carter Texas Tech 99-51 48
Texas Southern 1993-94 19-11 Robert Moreland Arkansas 129-63 66
Texas State 1918-19 TBD unavailable Texas 89-6 83
Texas Tech 2007-08 16-15 Pat Knight Kansas 109-51 58
Toledo 1932-33 3-13 Dave Connelly Ohio State 64-10 54
Tulane 2000-01 9-21 Shawn Finney Cincinnati 105-57 48
Tulsa 1947-48 7-16 John Garrison Kentucky 72-18 54
UAB 1990-91 18-13 Gene Bartow UNLV 109-68 41
UCLA 1996-97 24-8 Steve Lavin Stanford 109-61 48
UNLV 1970-71 16-10 John Bayer Houston 130-73 57
U.S. International 1989-90 12-16 Gary Zarecky Oklahoma 173-101 72
Utah 1934-35 10-9 Vadal Peterson Denver AC 60-16 44
Utah State 1909-10 3-7 Clayton Teetzel Utah 69-15 54
Utah State 1925-26 13-5 Lowell Romney Southern California 82-28 54
Valparaiso 1967-68 11-15 Gene Bartow Houston 158-81 77
Vanderbilt 1946-47 7-8 Norm Cooper Kentucky 98-29 69
Villanova 1921-22 11-4 Michael Saxe Army 58-11 47
Virginia 1964-65 7-18 Bill Gibson Duke 136-72 64
Virginia Commonwealth 1976-77 13-13 Dana Kirk Auburn 109-59 50
Virginia Tech 1952-53 4-19 Red Laird Marshall 113-57 56
Wagner 1998-99 9-18 Tim Capstraw Connecticut 111-46 65
Wake Forest 1913-14 10-7 J.R. Crozier Virginia 80-16 64
Washington 1988-89 12-16 Andy Russo Arizona 116-61 55
Washington State 1964-65 9-17 Marv Harshman UCLA 93-41 52
Washington State 2004-05 12-16 Dick Bennett Oklahoma State 81-29 52
Weber State 1988-89 17-11 Denny Huston Akron 92-50 42
West Virginia 1978-79 16-12 Gale Catlett Louisville 106-60 46
Western Carolina 1998-99 8-21 Phil Hopkins Maryland 113-46 67
Western Kentucky 1990-91 14-14 Ralph Willard Georgia 124-65 59
Western Michigan 1988-89 12-16 Vern Payne Michigan 107-60 47
Wichita State 1912-13 1-11 E.V. Long Ottawa 80-8 72
William & Mary 1918-19 3-6 V.M. Geddy Roanoke 87-6 81
Wisconsin 1975-76 10-16 John Powless Indiana 114-61 53
Wisconsin 1985-86 12-16 Steve Yoder Iowa 101-48 53
Wright State 1976-77 11-16 Marcus Jackson Cincinnati 120-52 68
Wyoming 1910-11 1-4 Harold Dean Colorado 65-12 53
Xavier 1966-67 13-13 Don Ruberg Kansas 100-52 48
Yale 1976-77 6-20 Ray Carazo Clemson 104-50 54
Youngstown State 1941-42 9-12 Dom Rosselli Toledo 88-32 56

Saving General Ryan: Traevon Jackson Next Case of Bo Knows Development

Has there ever been a coach in an elite "Power 6" league with a consistent track record for dramatic player development anywhere close to duplicating Wisconsin's Bo Ryan? A UW player became an All-Big Ten Conference selection each of the previous five campaigns and seven of last eight after previously averaging fewer than three points per game as a freshman. This year, point guard Traevon Jackson (1.1 in 2011-12) could join the following chronological list of Badgers becoming an all-league choice under Ryan after averaging fewer than 3 ppg as a freshman (all but one of them fewer than 2 ppg):

G Kammron Taylor (1.2 ppg in 2003-04 to 13.3 ppg in 2006-07)
G Michael Flowers (1.2 ppg in 2004-05 to 9.6 ppg in 2007-08)
G Trevon Hughes (1.4 ppg in 2006-07 to 15.3 ppg in 2009-10)
F Jon Leuer (2.9 ppg in 2007-08 to 18.3 ppg in 2010-11)
G Jordan Taylor (1.6 ppg in 2008-09 to 18.1 ppg in 2010-11 and 14.8 ppg in 2011-12)
C Jared Berggren (1.1 ppg in 2009-10 to 11 ppg in 2012-13)
C Frank Kaminsky (1.8 ppg in 2011-12 to 14.1 ppg in 2013-14)

"Saving" his program time and time again by turning scars into stars, it is no wonder Wisconsin won 50 consecutive contests under "General" Ryan in one stretch when the Badgers were ahead or tied with five minutes remaining in regulation. They never finished lower than fourth place in the Big Ten standings in his first 13 years at their helm. Kaminsky scored a school-record 43 points early in the 2013-14 campaign en route to pacing the team in scoring average. It is time to right "Ryan's Wrong." There is no satisfactory explanation why Ryan never has been named national coach of the year.

Centers of Attention: Will Frosh Okafor Be More Like Davis or Drummond?

Regal recruit Jahlil Okafor, designated preseason national player of the year in some quarters, hit 9 of 10 field-goal attempts for Duke as the Blue Devils hosed the Presbyterian Blue Hose, 113-44, in their season opener. But Okafor (19 points/6 rebounds) still needs to compete against quality competition for observers to try to gauge his potential. Will Okafor's first-season impact be more like Anthony Davis, the national player of the year two seasons ago when he sparked Kentucky to an NCAA title, or Andre Drummond, who averaged a modest 10 ppg and 7.6 rpg for Connecticut as the disappointing Huskies finished out of the 2011-12 final Top 25 polls?

Actually, textbook centers are becoming a rare breed. Time will tell if Davis or Okafor eventually deserve to be included among the premier pivotmen in college basketball history. By almost any measure, centers in the last 40 years don't seem to be anywhere close to duplicating feats that luminaries Lew Alcindor, Artis Gilmore, Bob Lanier, Jerry Lucas, Bill Russell and Bill Walton achieved in their initial varsity campaigns.

Similar to Navy's David Robinson in 1983-84, Drummond was scoreless in his season debut three years ago against Columbia. In a forgettable debut, Wake Forest's Tim Duncan was also scoreless in a season-opening loss to NCAA Division II Alaska-Anchorage in 1993-94 before rebounding with a 12-point, 12-rebound performance in his next outing against Hawaii.

Alcindor (77: 56 points/21 rebounds) and Chamberlain (83: 52 points/31 rebounds) each totaled more points and rebounds in their college game debut than Drummond, Duncan, Patrick Ewing, Nerlens Noel, Hakeem Olajuwon, Shaquille O'Neal, Robinson and Ralph Sampson amassed collectively. Following is a look at how many of the premier centers in history fared in their varsity debut against a major college and a summary of their first season of NCAA Division I competition:

Celebrated Center School First Varsity Season Debut Game PPG RPG W-L Mark
Nerlens Noel Kentucky 2012-13 4 points/9 rebounds 10.5 9.5 21-12
Anthony Davis Kentucky 2011-12 23 points/10 rebounds 14.2 10.4 38-2
Greg Oden Ohio State 2006-07 14 points/10 rebounds 15.7 9.6 35-4
Tim Duncan Wake Forest 1993-94 12 points/12 rebounds 9.8 9.6 21-12
Shaquille O'Neal Louisiana State 1989-90 10 points/5 rebounds 13.9 12.0 23-9
Alonzo Mourning Georgetown 1988-89 10 points/10 rebounds 13.1 7.3 29-5
David Robinson Navy 1983-84 scoreless/1 rebound 7.6 4.0 24-8
Hakeem Olajuwon Houston 1981-82 2 points/0 rebounds 8.3 6.5 25-8
Patrick Ewing Georgetown 1981-82 7 points/4 rebounds 12.7 8.5 30-7
Ralph Sampson Virginia 1979-80 4 points/6 rebounds 14.9 11.2 24-10
*Bill Walton UCLA 1971-72 19 points/14 rebounds 21.1 15.5 29-1
**Artis Gilmore Jacksonville 1969-70 35 points/18 rebounds 26.5 22.2 17-7
*Bob Lanier St. Bonaventure 1967-68 23 points/17 rebounds 26.2 15.6 23-2
*Lew Alcindor UCLA 1966-67 56 points/21 rebounds 29.0 15.5 30-0
*Jerry Lucas Ohio State 1959-60 16 points/28 rebounds 26.3 16.3 25-3
*Wilt Chamberlain Kansas 1956-57 52 points/31 rebounds 29.6 18.9 24-3
*Bill Russell San Francisco 1953-54 16 points/17 rebounds 19.9 19.2 14-7

*Sophomore classification.
**Junior classification after attending junior college.

Humble Pie: Memphis' Loss to Christian Brothers Won't Send Tigers to Hell

"I claim to be a simple individual liable to err like any other fellow mortal. I own, however, that I have humility enough to confess my errors and to retrace my steps." - Mahatma Gandhi

An exhibition game setback for Memphis against local Division II institution Christian Brothers was a generous dose of humility for the Tigers and coach Josh Pastner. But they can take some comfort from the fact that the inexplicable defeat won't formally count against their record. Tom Izzo-coached Michigan State (Grand Valley State prior to start of 2007-08 campaign) and Jim Boeheim-coached Syracuse (LeMoyne in 2009-10) each incurred the ignominy of succumbing against a small-school opponent in an exhibition contest before reaching an NCAA playoff regional semifinal by season's end. Actually, Pastner is in good company among mentors exposed to the humility described in Gandhi's quote.

Many of the biggest names in college coaching history had to recover from embarrassing defeats that aren't cited on their otherwise mostly regal resumes. For instance, there are numerous mentors who captured NCAA championships despite losing to a small school at some point in their careers - Phog Allen (lost to Emporia State), Jim Calhoun (American International, Assumption, Brandeis, Bridgeport, Florida Southern, Merrimack, St. Anselm, Stonehill and Tufts), John Calipari (Florida Tech and Lowell), Denny Crum (Chaminade), Jim Harrick (Abilene Christian), Don Haskins (Louisiana College), Hank Iba (Abilene Christian and Westminster), George Ireland (Regis), Doggie Julian (Amherst, Colby, St. Anselm, St. Michael's, Springfield, Tampa and Williams), Mike Krzyzewski (King's, Scranton and SUNY-Buffalo), Rollie Massimino (New Orleans and Philadelphia Textile), Al McGuire (Evansville and Washington MO), Rick Pitino (Adelphi), Nolan Richardson Jr. (American-Puerto Rico), Norman Sloan (Presbyterian), John Thompson Jr. (Assumption, Gannon, Randolph-Macon and Roanoke) and Jim Valvano (Armstrong State, Bloomsburg, Gannon, Tampa and Wilkes).

In 2003-04, CBC defeated a DI university (Troy State) during the regular season. Kansas' Bill Self lost 18 consecutive contests bridging the 1993-94 and 1994-95 seasons with Oral Roberts but at least he didn't lose a decision to a non-Division I institution. The following alphabetical list "retraces steps" of prominent coaches who lost games to non-Division I colleges during their major-college careers:

  • Forrest "Phog" Allen - Lost to Emporia State (Kan.) in 1947-48 while coaching Kansas.
  • Forrest "Forddy" Anderson - Lost to Emporia State (Kan.) in 1947-48 while coaching Drake. Lost to Northern Michigan in 1960-61 while coaching Michigan State.
  • John Bach - Lost to Adelphi (N.Y.) in 1958-59 while coaching Fordham.
  • Kevin Bannon - Lost to Grand Canyon (Ariz.) at Hawaii in 1991-92 while coaching Rider.
  • Rick Barnes - Lost at Chaminade (Hawaii) in 1991-92 while coaching Providence and in 2012-13 while coaching Texas.
  • J.D. Barnett - Lost to Louisiana Christian in 1995-96 while coaching Northwestern State (La.).
  • Jim Baron - Lost to Walsh (Ohio) in 1992-93 while coaching St. Bonaventure. Lost to Lubbock Christian (Tex.) at Las Vegas in 2003-04 while coaching Rhode Island. Lost to Metro State (Colo.) while coaching Canisius.
  • Gene Bartow - Lost at American-Puerto Rico in 1994-95 while coaching UAB.
  • Dick Bennett - Lost to Wisconsin-Eau Claire in 1985-86 and 1986-87 while coaching Wisconsin-Green Bay.
  • Eddie Biedenbach - Lost to Montreat (N.C.) in 2001-02 and Lenoir-Rhyne (N.C.) in 2005-06 while coaching UNC Asheville.
  • Tom Blackburn - Lost to Anderson (Ind.) in 1947-48, Ohio Wesleyan in 1948-49, Muskingum (Ohio) in 1949-50 and Wittenberg (Ohio) in 1962-63 while coaching Dayton.
  • Bill Blair - Lost to Morris Harvey (W. Va.) and twice to Roanoke (Va.) in 1972-73 and to West Virginia Tech and Shepherd (W.Va.) in 1973-74 while coaching VMI.
  • George Blaney - Lost to Springfield (Mass.) in 1969-70 and 1971-72 while coaching Dartmouth. Lost to Assumption (Mass.) in 1973-74 and 1985-86 and at Florida Southern in 1979-80 while coaching Holy Cross.
  • Dave Bliss - Lost to Rollins (Fla.) and Texas Wesleyan in 1980-81 and at Chaminade (Hawaii) in 1984-85 while coaching SMU. Lost to Eastern New Mexico in 1991-92 while coaching New Mexico.
  • Bob Boyd - Lost to Tennessee-Martin in 1981-82 and Delta State (Miss.) in 1985-86 while coaching Mississippi State.
  • Jim Brandenburg - Lost to South Dakota in 1979-80 while coaching Wyoming.
  • Byron "Buster" Brannon - Lost to Sam Houston State (Tex.) twice in 1938-39 and once in 1940-41 while coaching Rice. Lost to East Texas State, at Hamline (Minn.) and twice to Austin (Tex.) College in 1948-49, Midwestern State (Tex.) in 1953-54 and Kentucky Wesleyan in 1955-56 while coaching Texas Christian.
  • Tom Brennan - Lost to St. Michael's (Vt.) in 1986-87, 1987-88 and 1988-89 while coaching Vermont.
  • John Bunn - Lost to Eastern New Mexico (six times from 1957-58 through 1962-63), Fort Hays (Kan.) State (five times from 1957-58 through 1962-63), New Mexico Highlands in 1960-61, twice to Panhandle State (Okla.) in 1957-58, St. Cloud State (Minn.) in 1962-63, Southwestern Oklahoma State in 1956-57, Wayne State (Neb.) in 1962-63 and Western New Mexico in 1961-62 while coaching Northern Colorado.
  • Jim Calhoun - Lost to Assumption (Mass.) in 1972-73; to Tufts (Mass.), American International (Mass.), Bridgeport (Conn.) and at Assumption (Mass.) in 1973-74; Assumption (Mass.) and Brandeis (Mass.) in 1974-75; Merrimack (Mass.) in 1975-76; Bridgeport (Conn.), Merrimack (Mass.), St. Anselm (Vt.) and Stonehill (Mass.) in 1976-77; American International (Mass.) and Assumption (Mass.) in 1978-79 and Florida Southern in 1980-81 while coaching Northeastern.
  • John Calipari - Lost at Florida Tech in 1988-89 and to Lowell (Mass.) in 1989-90 while coaching Massachusetts.
  • Lou Campanelli - Lost to West Virginia Tech in 1980-81 while coaching James Madison. Lost to Alaska-Anchorage in 1990-91 on neutral court while coaching California.
  • Howard Cann - Lost to Panzer in 1938-39 and Brandeis (Mass.) in 1956-57 while coaching NYU.
  • P.J. Carlesimo - Lost at Bentley (Mass.), to Southern Connecticut on a neutral court, to C.W. Post (N.Y.), at Springfield (Mass.) and at Bridgeport (Conn.) in 1976-77; to New Haven (Conn.) and at C.W. Post (N.Y.) in 1977-78, and at Staten Island (N.Y.) and U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (N.Y.) in 1981-82 while coaching Wagner.
  • Henry "Doc" Carlson - Lost to Bethany (W. Va.) in 1948-49, Geneva (Pa.) in 1941-42, 1950-51 and 1952-53 and Carnegie Tech (Pa.) three times in four seasons from 1938-39 through 1941-42 plus five times in six seasons from 1949-50 through 1954-55 while coaching Pittsburgh.
  • Pete Carril - Lost to East Stroudsburg (Pa.) in 1966-67 while coaching Lehigh.
  • Don Casey - Lost to Philadelphia Textile in 1975-76 while coaching Temple.
  • Joe Cipriano - Lost at Hawaii-Hilo in 1976-77 while coaching Nebraska.
  • Gary Colson - Lost to John Brown (Ark.) in 1972-73 and Moorhead (Minn.) State in 1973-74 while coaching Pepperdine. Lost to Alaska-Anchorage in 1983-84 while coaching New Mexico.
  • Bobby Cremins - Lost to Lenoir-Rhyne (N.C.) in 1975-76 and twice in 1977-78 while coaching Appalachian State.
  • Denny Crum - Lost at Chaminade (Hawaii) in 1983-84 and 1984-85 while coaching Louisville.
  • Charles "Chick" Davies - Lost to Waynesburg (Pa.) in 1937-38 and 1938-39 and to Wooster (Ohio) in 1937-38 while coaching Duquesne.
  • Tom Davis - Lost to Moravian (Pa.) in 1973-74 and at Albright (Pa.) in 1975-76 while coaching Lafayette. Lost to Chico State (Calif.) in 1982-83 while coaching Stanford. Lost to UC Riverside in 1988-89 while coaching Iowa.
  • Johnny Dee - Lost to Jacksonville (Ala.) State in 1952-53 while coaching Alabama.
  • Don DeVoe - Lost to Johns Hopkins (Md.) in 2002-03 while coaching Navy.
  • Ed Diddle - Lost to Kentucky Wesleyan in 1955-56, David Lipscomb (Tenn.) in 1962-63 and LeMoyne (N.Y.) in 1963-64 while coaching Western Kentucky.
  • Bob Donewald - Lost to Cal State Bakersfield in 1980-81 while coaching Illinois State.
  • Homer Drew - Lost to Bethel (Ind.) in 1997-98 while coaching Valparaiso.
  • Charles "Lefty" Driesell - Lost to Catawba (N.C.) twice in 1960-61 and to Carson-Newman (Tenn.) and Erskine (S.C.) in 1961-62 while coaching Davidson.
  • Hugh Durham - Lost at Puerto Rico-Mayaguez in 2001-02 while coaching Jacksonville.
  • Bobby Dye - Lost at Chapman (Calif.) in 1975-76 while coaching Cal State Fullerton. Lost to Lewis-Clark State (Idaho) in 1985-86 while coaching Boise State.
  • Norm Ellenberger - Lost at Hawaii-Hilo in 1976-77 while coaching New Mexico.
  • Fred Enke - Lost to Regis (Colo.) in 1959-60 while coaching Arizona.
  • Larry Eustachy - Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1991-92 and to Elizabeth City State (N.C.) in 1992-93 while coaching Idaho.
  • Paul Evans - Lost at Rollins (Fla.) in 1981-82 while coaching Navy.
  • Bill C. Foster - Lost at University of the South (Tenn.) and Roanoke (Va.) in 1970-71 and to Valdosta (Ga.) State in 1971-72 while coaching UNC Charlotte. Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1987-88 while coaching Miami (Fla.).
  • Bill E. Foster - Lost at Albright (Pa.) in 1964-65 while coaching Rutgers. Lost at Chaminade (Hawaii) in 1981-82 while coaching South Carolina. Lost to Rollins (Fla.) in 1986-87 and 1987-88 while coaching Northwestern.
  • Harold "Bud" Foster - Lost to South Dakota in 1956-57 while coaching Wisconsin.
  • Bill Frieder - Lost to Alaska-Anchorage on a neutral court in 1988-89 while coaching Michigan.
  • Jack Friel - Lost at Centenary (La.) in 1955-56, to Spring Hill (Ala.) in 1955-56 and Whitworth (Wash.) five times from 1951-52 through 1956-57 while coaching Washington State.
  • John "Taps" Gallagher - Lost to Gannon (Pa.) and Rochester (N.Y.) in 1964-65 while coaching Niagara.
  • Dave Gavitt - Lost at Springfield (Mass.) in 1967-68 while coaching Dartmouth.
  • Boyd Grant - Lost to Wisconsin-Parkside in 1978-79 while coaching Fresno State.
  • Murray Greason - Lost to Rio Grande (Ohio) in 1953-54 while coaching Wake Forest.
  • Ron Greene - Lost to Spring Hill (Ala.) in 1966-67 while coaching Loyola of New Orleans. Lost to Tennessee Wesleyan and Mississippi College in 1978-79, Arkansas College in 1981-82, West Virginia Tech in 1982-83 and Lincoln Memorial (Tenn.) in 1984-85 while coaching Murray State. Lost to Rollins (Fla.) in 1986-87 while coaching Indiana State.
  • Tim Grgurich - Lost to Morris Harvey (W. Va.) in 1977-78 while coaching Pittsburgh.
  • Leonard Hamilton - Lost at BYU-Hawaii in 1987-88 while coaching Oklahoma State.
  • Jim Harrick - Lost at Abilene (Tex.) Christian in 1984-85 while coaching Pepperdine.
  • Dick Harter - Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1978-79 while coaching Penn State.
  • Jack Hartman - Lost to Kentucky Wesleyan four times in three years from 1967-68 through 1969-70 while coaching Southern Illinois.
  • Don Haskins - Lost to Louisiana College in 1977-78 while coaching Texas-El Paso.
  • George "Jud" Heathcote - Lost at Puget Sound (Wash.) in 1972-73, 1973-74 and 1975-76 and at Southern Colorado in 1972-73 while coaching Montana.
  • Bill Henderson - Lost to Howard Payne (Tex.) in 1955-56 while coaching Baylor.
  • Lou Henson - Lost to Howard Payne (Tex.) twice, Midwestern State (Tex.), Eastern New Mexico and Abilene Christian (Tex.) in 1962-63; Abilene Christian and Midwestern State in 1964-65, and Pittsburg State (Kan.) in 1965-66 while coaching Hardin-Simmons. Lost at Eastern New Mexico in 1966-67, to Angelo State (Tex.) in 1971-72, at Alaska-Fairbanks in 1998-99 and at BYU-Hawaii in 2001-02 while coaching New Mexico State.
  • Eddie Hickey - Lost to South Dakota in 1938-39 and 1939-40 while coaching Creighton.
  • Bernard "Peck" Hickman - Lost to Georgetown (Ky.) in 1958-59 while coaching Louisville.
  • Paul "Tony" Hinkle - Lost to Wabash (Ind.) in 1959-60, twice in 1960-61 and in 1966-67 while coaching Butler.
  • Terry Holland - Lost at Chaminade (Hawaii) in 1982-83 while coaching Virginia.
  • Ben Howland - Lost to Concordia (Calif.) in 1994-95 while coaching Northern Arizona.
  • Henry "Hank" Iba - Lost to Westminster (Mo.) in 1934-35 and 1936-37 and Abilene (Tex.) Christian in 1965-66 while coaching Oklahoma A&M/Oklahoma State.
  • Moe Iba - Lost to Union (Tenn.) in 1968-69 and 1969-70 while coaching Memphis State.
  • George Ireland - Lost to Regis (Colo.) in 1954-55, North Dakota State in 1966-67, Illinois Wesleyan in 1970-71 and Missouri Western in 1972-73 while coaching Loyola of Chicago.
  • Maurice "Maury" John - Lost to South Dakota State in 1958-59 and Washington (Mo.) in 1963-64 while coaching Drake.
  • Alvin "Doggie" Julian - Lost to St. Michael's (Vt.), at St. Anselm (N.H.) and at Tampa (Fla.) in 1950-51; to Amherst (Mass.) in 1952-53; at St. Michael's (Vt.), to Williams (Mass.) and at Springfield (Mass.) in 1960-61; to Colby (Maine) in 1961-62, and to Williams (Mass.) in 1964-65 while coaching Dartmouth.
  • Jim Killingsworth - Lost to Westmont (Calif.) in 1980-81 while coaching Texas Christian.
  • Bob King - Lost at Washington (Mo.) in 1963-64 while coaching New Mexico.
  • Dana Kirk - Lost to Wisconsin-Parkside in 1979-80 while coaching Memphis State.
  • Jack Kraft - Lost to Assumption (Mass.) in 1974-75 while coaching Rhode Island.
  • Mike Krzyzewski - Lost to SUNY-Buffalo, Scranton (Pa.) and King's College (Pa.) in 1975-76 while coaching Army.
  • Steve Lappas - Lost to Springfield (Mass.) in 1988-89 while coaching Manhattan.
  • Jim Larranaga - Lost to Findlay (Ohio) in 1991-92 while coaching Bowling Green.
  • Frank Layden - Lost to Thomas More (Ky.) in 1970-71 while coaching Niagara.
  • Jack Leaman - Lost to American International (Mass.) in 1966-67 and 1969-70, Springfield (Mass.) in 1970-71 and Bentley (Mass.) in 1978-79 while coaching Massachusetts.
  • A.E. "Abe" Lemons - Lost to Centenary (La.) in 1958-59, McMurry (Tex.) in 1960-61 and Wayland Baptist (Tex.) in 1984-85 while coaching Oklahoma City. Lost to Texas A&I in 1973-74 while coaching Pan American.
  • Jim Les - Lost to Lubbock (Tex.) Christian at Las Vegas in 2003-04 while coaching Bradley.
  • Guy Lewis - Lost to St. Mary's (Tex.) in 1969-70 and 1974-75, Texas A&I in 1979-80 and Alaska Anchorage and Biscayne (Fla.) in 1980-81 while coaching Houston.
  • Harry Litwack - Lost to West Chester (Pa.) in 1969-70 while coaching Temple.
  • Taylor "Tates" Locke - Lost to North Park (Ill.) in 1978-79 while coaching Jacksonville.
  • Ken Loeffler - Lost to Centenary (La.) in 1956-57 while coaching Texas A&M.
  • Jim Lynam - Lost to Saint Leo (Fla.) and at Assumption (Mass.) in 1968-69 and to Southern Connecticut in 1969-70 while coaching Fairfield. Lost at King's (Pa.) in 1975-76 while coaching American University. Lost at Rollins (Fla.) in 1979-80 while coaching St. Joseph's.
  • Nick Macarchuk - Lost to Buffalo State in 1982-83 while coaching Canisius.
  • John MacLeod - Lost to Samford (Ala.) in 1971-72 while coaching Oklahoma. Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1998-99 while coaching Notre Dame.
  • John "Red" Manning - Lost to Carnegie-Mellon (Pa.) in 1959-60 while coaching Duquesne.
  • Rollie Massimino - Lost at New Orleans in 1973-74 and to Philadelphia Textile in 1975-76 and 1976-77 while coaching Villanova.
  • James "Babe" McCarthy - Lost to University of the South (Tenn.) in 1955-56 and Mississippi College in 1964-65 while coaching Mississippi State.
  • Neil McCarthy - Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1978-79 while coaching Weber State. Lost to Western New Mexico in 1986-87 while coaching New Mexico State.
  • Al McGuire - Lost at Washington (Mo.) in 1964-65 and Evansville in 1965-66 while coaching Marquette.
  • Frank McGuire - Lost at Florida Southern in 1979-80 while coaching South Carolina.
  • Jack McKinney - Lost to Catholic (D.C.) in 1966-67 while coaching St. Joseph's.
  • Eddie Melvin - Lost to Cortland (N.Y.) State in 1947-48 and Gannon (Pa.) in 1948-49 while coaching St. Bonaventure. Lost to Morris Harvey (W. Va.) in 1956-57 and Wittenberg (Ohio) in 1958-59 and 1959-60 while coaching Toledo.
  • Shelby Metcalf - Lost at Eastern Montana in 1980-81 and to St. Mary's (Tex.) in 1984-85 while coaching Texas A&M.
  • Ray Meyer - Lost to Beloit (Wis.) in 1950-51, at North Dakota in 1965-66 and to St. Joseph's (Ind.) in 1969-70 while coaching DePaul.
  • Eldon Miller - Lost to Winona (Minn.) State and Wisconsin-Platteville in 1986-87 and at American-Puerto Rico and to Morningside (Iowa) in 1990-91 while coaching Northern Iowa.
  • Ralph Miller - Lost at Beloit (Wis.) in 1951-52 while coaching Wichita.
  • Charles Moir - Lost to Dillard (La.) in 1973-74 and 1974-75 and Xavier (La.) in 1973-74 while coaching Tulane.
  • Mike Montgomery - Lost to Puget Sound (Wash.) in 1978-79 and 1980-81 while coaching Montana. Lost at Chaminade (Hawaii) in 1992-93 while coaching Stanford.
  • Stan Morrison - Lost to San Francisco State in 1974-75 and at North Dakota in 1978-79 while coaching Pacific.
  • Joe Mullaney - Lost to Assumption (Mass.) in 1963-64 and 1984-85 while coaching Providence. Lost to Stonehill (Mass.) in 1979-80 while coaching Brown.
  • Jeff Mullins - Lost at Florida Southern in 1987-88 while coaching UNC Charlotte.
  • Gerald Myers - Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1990-91 while coaching Texas Tech.
  • Lynn Nance - Lost to Nebraska-Omaha in 1979-80 while coaching Iowa State.
  • Danny Nee - Lost to Charleston (W. Va.) in 1980-81 while coaching Ohio University.
  • Jim O'Brien - Lost at Florida Tech in 1988-89 while coaching Boston College.
  • Dave Odom - Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1993-94 while coaching Wake Forest.
  • Johnny Orr - Lost at Washington (Mo.) in 1964-65 while coaching Massachusetts. Lost at Eastern Montana in 1981-82 while coaching Iowa State.
  • Bobby Paschal - Lost to Tampa in 1986-87 and 1987-88 while coaching South Florida.
  • Tom Penders - Lost at CCNY in 1974-75 and at San Francisco State in 1977-78 while coaching Columbia. Lost at Hawaii-Pacific in 1985-86 while coaching Fordham.
  • Jerry Pimm - Lost to Midwestern State (Tex.) in 1979-80 while coaching Utah. Lost to San Francisco State in 1983-84 while coaching UC Santa Barbara.
  • Rick Pitino - Lost to Adelphi (N.Y.) in 1978-79 while coaching Boston University.
  • Harry Rabenhorst - Lost to Louisiana College in 1955-56 and at Centenary (La.) in 1956-57 while coaching Louisiana State.
  • Bill Raftery - Lost to Siena (N.Y.) in 1972-73, at Rollins (Fla.) in 1973-74 and to King's College (Pa.) in 1975-76 while coaching Seton Hall.
  • Jack Ramsay - Lost to Albright (Pa.) in 1957-58 and 1961-62 while coaching St. Joseph's.
  • George Raveling - Lost to St. Martin's (Wash.) in 1980-81 and Eastern Montana in 1981-82 while coaching Washington State.
  • Roger Reid - Lost to Colorado-Colorado Springs in 2007-08 while coaching Southern Utah.
  • Nolan Richardson Jr. - Lost at American-Puerto Rico in 1997-98 while coaching Arkansas.
  • Alfred "A.J." Robertson - Lost to South Dakota in 1947-48 while coaching Bradley.
  • Les Robinson - Lost to Francis Marion (S.C.) in 1983-84 while coaching The Citadel.
  • Lee Rose - Lost at Eastern Montana in 1977-78 while coaching UNC Charlotte.
  • Lou Rossini - Lost to Bentley (Mass.) in 1978-79 and Scranton (Pa.) in 1975-76 while coaching St. Francis (N.Y.).
  • John "Honey" Russell - Lost at Saint Thomas (Minn.) in 1937-38, to David & Elkins (W. Va.) in 1949-50 and to Albright (Pa.) in 1949-50 and 1957-58 while coaching Seton Hall.
  • Alex Severance - Lost to Albright (Pa.) in 1941-42, Swarthmore (Pa.) in 1943-44 and 1944-45 and Scranton (Pa.) in 1957-58 while coaching Villanova.
  • Norman Sloan - Lost at Presbyterian (S.C.) in 1956-57 while coaching The Citadel.
  • Jim Snyder - Lost to Marietta (Ohio) four times in five years from 1949-50 through 1953-54 and in 1959-60, Mount Union (Ohio) in 1949-50, Muskingum (Ohio) in 1950-51, Beloit (Wis.) and Lake Forest (Ill.) in 1951-52, Ohio Wesleyan in 1952-53 and Otterbein (Ohio) in 1966-67 while coaching Ohio University.
  • Norm Stewart - Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1985-86 while coaching Missouri.
  • John Thompson Jr. - Lost to Assumption (Mass.) in 1973-74; Gannon (Pa.) in 1975-76; Randolph-Macon (Va.) in 1974-75; Roanoke (Va.) in 1972-73, and at South Florida in 1972-73 while coaching Georgetown.
  • Ken Trickey - Lost to Union (Tenn.) in 1965-66, Transylvania (Ky.) in 1966-67 and 1968-69 and Oglethorpe (Ga.) in 1967-68 while coaching Middle Tennessee State. Lost to Nebraska-Omaha and South Dakota in 1975-76 while coaching Iowa State. Lost to Cameron (Okla.) in 1980-81 while coaching Oral Roberts.
  • Billy Tubbs - Lost to Ohio Northern in 1980-81 while coaching Oklahoma. Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1995-96 while coaching Texas Christian. Lost to Delta State (Miss.) in 2005-06 while coaching Lamar.
  • M.K. Turk - Lost at Florida Southern in 1979-80 and to Fairmont State (W. Va.) in 1984-85 while coaching Southern Mississippi.
  • Jim Valvano - Lost to Armstrong State (Ga.) and Gannon (Pa.) in 1972-73, Wilkes (Pa.) in 1973-74 and Bloomsburg (Pa.) in 1974-75 while coaching Bucknell. Lost at Tampa in 1986-87 while coaching North Carolina State.
  • Bob Vanatta - Lost at Centenary (La.) in 1956-57 while coaching Memphis State.
  • Willem "Butch" van Breda Kolff - Lost at Albright (Pa.) in 1951-52 while coaching Lafayette. Lost at Florida Southern in 1988-89 while coaching Hofstra.
  • Perry Watson - Lost to Wayne State (Mich.) in 1993-94 while coaching Detroit.
  • Stan Watts - Lost to Hamline (Minn.) in 1951-52 while coaching Brigham Young.
  • Clifford Wells - Lost to Spring Hill (Ala.) in 1953-54 and Louisiana College in 1962-63 while coaching Tulane.
  • Bob Weltlich - Lost at Alaska-Anchorage in 1986-87 while coaching Texas.
  • Paul Westhead - Lost at Biscayne (Fla.) in 1971-72 and Florida Southern in 1978-79 while coaching La Salle.
  • Davey Whitney - Lost to Delta State (Miss.) six times in five years from 1985-86 through 1989-90; Dillard (La.) in 1986-87; Miles (Ala.) in 1988-89 and 1990-91; Mississippi College in 1990-91, 1992-93 and 1993-94; Slippery Rock (Pa.) in 1993-94, and Tougaloo (Miss.) in 1996-97 while coaching Alcorn State.
  • Ralph Willard - Lost to Williams (Mass.) in 2003-04 while coaching Holy Cross.
  • Carroll Williams - Lost to San Francisco State in 1970-71 and at Alaska-Anchorage in 1991-92 while coaching Santa Clara.
  • Charlie Woollum - Lost to Rochester (N.Y.) in 1975-76 and 1976-77, Upsala (N.J.) in 1977-78 and Messiah (Pa.) in 1981-82 while coaching Bucknell.
  • Jay Wright - Lost at Chaminade (Hawaii) in 2003-04 while coaching Villanova.
  • Ned Wulk - Lost to Lawrence Tech (Mich.) and twice to Baldwin-Wallace (Ohio) in 1952-53 while coaching Xavier. Lost to Cal Poly Pomona in 1969-70 while coaching Arizona State.

Walking Tall: O'Neill Killed Usama Bin Laden But Who Tracked Him Down?

Fox News carried a riveting two-part program featuring Navy SEAL Team 6 member Robert O'Neill (senior chief petty officer is recipient of two Silver and five Bronze Stars) as "The Man Who Killed Usama Bin Laden." Amid focusing on ridding Planet Earth of UBL, it seems we should also be celebrating an authentic hero from the college basketball ranks who was instrumental in tracking the terrorist down. But the selfless ex-athlete from a Midwest university hasn't "come out of the closet" for security reasons and might be underground with a fake identification.

In the documentation about dispatching UBL to hell (equivalent status even if satisfying 72 virgins is what transpired), the White House unveiled a photograph of President Barack Obama and his Cabinet inside the Situation Room, watching the daring commando raid unfold on May 1, 2011. But POTUS (JV player for Occidental CA) apparently wasn't the tallest ex-college hoopster in the room. Standing just outside the frame of that famous pic was an anonymous Central Intelligence Agency officer ("CIA John") who pursued UBL as a dogmatic deputy chief and reportedly was also influential as one of the principal proponents of drone deterrence. Two days after the world's most-wanted man was transformed into marine treat when dumped into the North Arabian Sea, "CIA John" accompanied then CIA Director Leon Panetta to Capitol Hill, where the Senate Intelligence Committee received a full briefing on the mission.

According to AP accounts at the time, the meticulous senior intelligence analyst was the first individual to put in writing that a legitimate CIA lead had been assembled on possibly locating UBL. He spearheaded the collection of clues for nearly 10 years, leading the agency to a fortified compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, and its epic counter-terrorism success. Our freedom-loving nation is eternally grateful that his manhunt accuracy as a deep-cover agent in pinpointing UBL's whereabouts stood in stark contrast to his free-throw marksmanship as a deep-bench player (barely over 30%) as a member of multiple NCAA playoff teams.

Box-office hit "Zero Dark Thirty" was an inspiring movie focusing on a young female CIA operative allegedly also from flyover country. She exhibited her tenacity, dedication and courage in primarily monitoring a vital courier for al-Qaeda's upper brass. According to Esquire, the shooter who killed UBL (subsequently acknowledged as Butte MT native O'Neill) gave the magazine out of his gun as a souvenir to bloodhound "Maya." While the film doesn't do justice to the male super spy, the patriot is likely to defer anyway to the concept "there is no 'I' in team." Naturally, Langley issued a perfunctory "no comment" because concern exists about publishing his name and running biographical details might make him a target for retribution.

Over the decades, there have been other notable "Secret Agent Men" in the CIA who were former college hoopsters. In fact, a Final Four player isn't required to hit a decisive basket or be selected Most Outstanding Player to be a hero. He doesn't even need to participate on the court. Bob Ames, a member of the Tom Gola-led La Salle teams in 1954 (national champion) and 1955 (runner-up to San Francisco), never got off the bench at the Final Four those two years although he was the only La Salle player to hit more than three-fourths of his free throws the season the Explorers won the NCAA title.

"Our coach, Ken Loeffler, only used seven guys, and Bob was the eighth man," said Frank Blatcher, a starter for the Explorers each season and their leading scorer with a total of 42 points at the Final Four on the championship team. "He had the talent. He just never got a chance to show it."

Ames, a pre-law major who scored a total of eight points in three NCAA playoff games in 1955, did have an opportunity to show his ability in another more vital endeavor, however. He joined the CIA and worked his way up the chain of command to become the Director of the CIA's Office of Analysis of the Near East and South Asia. "The Spy Who Loved Basketball" worked closely with both the Carter and Reagan administrations.

Regrettably, Ames was killed in Beirut in 1983. A truck loaded with TNT on a suicide mission rammed into the facility where Ames was staying while serving as a liaison trying to allay contacts among the Lebanese, Syrians and Israelis in hopes of calming the escalating discord.

"Here was a guy that turned out to have had a greater influence on our lives than just about any 1,000 other basketball players you can name," Blatcher said. "It just shows you that you don't have to be a star to accomplish something." Something like becoming a genuine American hero.

Elsewhere, the CIA's deputy director under George Bush in 1976 was Hank Knoche, the leading scorer in the Mountain States (Big Seven) Conference with 16.4 points per game for Colorado's 1946 NCAA Tournament team. Knoche, the father of former American University coach Chris Knoche, reputedly was the first player selected in the NBA's first college draft in 1947 after enrolling at Washington and Jefferson (Pa.) to play on a 16-4 team with two of his brothers. But he never appeared in the then-fledgling league, which doesn't have any official draft records prior to 1949. The franchise that selected him, the Pittsburgh Ironmen, folded shortly after the draft, and his rights reverted to the New York Knicks.

"I didn't know I was the first No. 1 pick until a writer from Atlanta called me for a story," Knoche said. "An NBA historian had informed him of my alleged status."

The elder Knoche, who went to live in the Denver area, chose not to play in an uncertain situation for little money. "I never received any contact from the Ironmen," he said. "The Knicks sent a contract offer in the mail, but it was for just $3,500 and that's if I made the team (many NBA standouts earn five times that amount every quarter).

"I chose to play industrial basketball, where I remember playing six times one year against seven-footer Bob Kurland (Oklahoma State three-time first-team All-American who never played in the NBA). That wasn't much fun going against Kurland because I was just a 6-4 center."

Knoche was recalled to the military during the Korean War, where he was assigned to intelligence work for the Navy and later embarked on a civilian career leading to a job with the CIA.

Another former college hoopster who carved out a CIA career was Pete Sivess, a center for Dickinson PA in 1935-36 before compiling a 7-11 record as a righthanded pitcher with the Philadelphia Phillies in three years from 1936 through 1938. While Moe Berg is the most famous MLB player linked with the CIA, his career as a spy pales in comparison to baseball contemporary Sivess, who is credited with defining CIA policy for handling Eastern Bloc defectors. During the height of the Cold War, Sivess conducted a "first haven" on Maryland's Eastern Shore where defectors were shipped to be debriefed. Probably the highest-profile spy Sivess monitored was "notorious double agent" Nicholas Shadrin, who died on a trip to Vienna in 1975 in a kidnapping attempt by Moscow's counterspies.

In the shadowy world of the CIA, no precise clues exist as to whether a basketball background for "CIA John" contributed to helping POTUS develop a comfort-zone bond with him similar to other ex-college hoopsters in his inner circle - Secretary of Education Arne Duncan (Harvard), departing Attorney General Eric Holder (Columbia), former "body man" Reggie Love (Duke) and former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mike Mullen (Navy). But it isn't ridiculous to suggest there might not have been a second inauguration for President Obama if he didn't trust "CIA John."

A vital hurdle approving the raid came when the SEAL Squadron leader briefed Mullen on merits of the mission. According to O'Neill's anonymous interview with Esquire, Vice Admiral William McRaven, head of Joint Special Ops Command, compared the raid and its fighters to the basketball movie Hoosiers in a final briefing with the participants in Operation Neptune's Spear.

A pithy precept occasionally surfaces in basketball trash talking that "some talk a good game and some play a good game." Depending upon your point of view, Time's Person of the Year in 2011 and each subsequent year could have been "CIA John." Surely, ex-Time managing editor Rick Stengel, a backup for Pete Carril-coached Princeton in the mid-1970s, would have encouraged his colleagues to give "CIA John" special consideration after the White House acknowledged him and his colleagues as "unbelievably competent professionals."

Deserved or not, other ex-college hoopsters may get the bulk of the glory ranging from taking credit for UBL's demise to some searing social issue actually paling in comparison. When, if ever, will our nation get the opportunity to pay homage to a genuine hoop hero comparable to Ames, Knoche and Sivess? Heaven only knows we need an authentic one these days to offset a lawless West Wing plus collegiate academic scandals and athletes treating women as bad as Sharia-Law zealot Islamic radicals. But at the moment, the stirring tale will simply be "The Greatest Hoop Story Never Fully Told."

Military Salute: Two Vets Returned to A-A Status Following 3 Years in Service

College basketball aficionados occasionally cite achievements they think never will be duplicated. On Veterans Day, they should be reminded about truly incredible comebacks likely never to be matched. In 1946-47, Andy Phillip (Illinois) and Gerry Tucker (Oklahoma) returned to first-team All-American status after missing three seasons while serving in the U.S. military during World War II. Charles Black (Kansas) and Kenny Sailors (Wyoming) also returned to All-American acclaim after missing two seasons serving in similar capacities.

Numerous standout players had their college playing careers interrupted by WWII. While much of the misguided media currently obsess with mundane matters as a new campaign is ushered in, they should be reminded about authentic American heroes. The press should be focusing on the following list of All-Americans - three each from Illinois, Kentucky and Notre Dame - who deserve to be honored, at least for a day, after having their college careers interrupted in the mid-1940s while serving in the U.S. Armed Forces:

Air Force - Charles Black (Kansas) and Jack Parkinson (Kentucky).

Army - Don Barksdale (UCLA), Lew Beck (Oregon State), A.L. Bennett (Oklahoma A&M), Gale Bishop (Washington State), Vince Boryla (Notre Dame/Denver), Harry Boykoff (St. John's), Bob Brannum (Kentucky), Arnie Ferrin (Utah), Alex Groza (Kentucky), Ralph Hamilton (Indiana), Walt Kirk (Illinois), Allie Paine (Oklahoma), Don Rehfeldt (Wisconsin), Jack Smiley (Illinois), Odie Spears (Western Kentucky) and Gerry Tucker (Oklahoma).

Marine Corps - Aud Brindley (Dartmouth), John Hargis (Texas), Mickey Marty (Loras), Andy Phillip (Illinois), Gene Rock (southern California) and Kenny Sailors (Wyoming).

Navy - Bobby Cook (Wisconsin), Howie Dallmar (Stanford/Penn), Dick Dickey (North Carolina State), Bob Faught (Notre Dame), Harold Gensichen (Western Michigan), Wyndol Gray (Bowling Green State), Hal Haskins (Hamline), Leo Klier (Notre Dame), Dick McGuire (St. John's) and John Oldham (Western Kentucky).

Valentine's Way: It's in the Name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Post

An old adage portends "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree." You know the father-son deal whether they boasted big-man credentials enabling them to dominate in the post or were adept as a playmaker driving to the post! A challenging dynamic exists when playing for the same school where your dad was a standout. Whether or not it's a fair sampling (majority of dads are better), comparing the following father-son duos might provide a window depicting when the quality of play was superior.

The Valentine's Versatile Way (Carlton and Denzel) will generate headlines for Michigan State in the Big Ten Conference this season after the Marble Collection (Roy and Roy Devyn) excelled for Iowa in recent campaigns. Another Big Ten family affair for the same school making an impact this year will be at Purdue (sophomore son Kendall Stephens following in footsteps of father Everette).

Marques Johnson was the third-leading scorer and fourth-leading rebounder for UCLA's 1975 NCAA champion and son Kris was a backup freshman for the Bruins' 1995 titlist. They are the only father-son duo to capture NCAA crowns for the same institution, propelling them atop the list of premier father-son combinations.

The Valentines likely will gain more prominence if Denzel flourishes as expected. At any rate, there is something in the family DNA for the following all-time father-son tandems making the most impact for same major university factoring in how long they attended school:

Rank Family School Father's College Career Summary Son's College Career Summary
1. Johnson UCLA Marques, the national player of the year as a senior, averaged 14.4 ppg and 7.8 rpg from 1973-74 through 1976-77. Kris averaged 11.6 ppg and 3.7 rpg from 1994-95 through 1997-98.
2. Marble Iowa Roy, a three-time All-Big Ten Conference selection and the Hawkeyes' all-time leading scorer (2,116 points), averaged 15.8 ppg and 5 rpg from 1985-86 through 1988-89. Roy Devyn averaged 12 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 2.7 apg and 1.3 spg from 2010-11 through 2013-14, ranking among the school's all-time top seven in points, rebounds, assists and steals.
3. Burtt Iona Steve Sr., a two-time MAAC MVP, became the school's all-time leading scorer with 2,534 points by finishing among nation's top 17 scorers each of his last three seasons from 1981-82 through 1983-84. Steve Jr., a three-time All-MAAC selection, is school runner-up with 2,034 points from 2002-03 through 2005-06, finishing seventh in country in scoring as a senior.
4. Paxson Dayton James, a starter for two NIT runner-up teams, averaged 10.9 ppg and 7.6 rpg in three seasons in mid-1950s. Jim, an All-American as a senior, averaged 18 ppg and 4.5 rpg from 1975-76 through 1978-79.
5. Perry Holy Cross Ronnie Sr. averaged 13.6 ppg from 1951-52 through 1953-54. Ronnie Jr., a three-time All-American, averaged 23.2 ppg and 3.9 apg while shooting 88.5% at free-throw line from 1976-77 through 1979-80.
6. Hosket Ohio State Wilmer Clemens was named to third five on College Humor Magazine A-A in 1932-33 when he was fourth-leading scorer in Big Ten (8 ppg) as member of league co-champion. Bill, a member of the U.S. Olympic squad after appearing in Final Four as a senior, averaged 19.5 ppg and 12.3 rpg in three seasons from 1965-66 through 1967-68.
7. Haws Brigham Young Marty, an All-WAC first-team selection as a senior when leading the Cougars in scoring with 18.5 ppg, averaged 10.9 ppg and 4.1 apg from 1986-87 through 1989-90. Tyler averaged 18.6 ppg and 4.3 rpg in his first three seasons, ranking among the nation's top seven scorers as a sophomore and junior.
8. Rautins Syracuse Leo, who led the Orangemen in rebounds and assists as a senior when he was an All-Big East Conference third-team selection, averaged 12.1 ppg, 6.3 rpg and 5 apg from 1980-81 through 1982-83 after transferring from Minnesota. Andy, an All-Big East second-team selection as a senior, averaged 8.8 ppg, 2.6 rpg, 2.7 apg and 1.4 spg from 2005-06 through 2009-10.
9. Brewer Arkansas Ron, an All-American as a senior for a 1978 Final Four team, averaged 15.8 ppg and 3.3 rpg after one season at JC level. Ronnie, a two-time All-SEC selection, averaged 15.7 ppg and 5 rpg from 2003-04 through 2005-06 before declaring early for NBA draft.
10. Robinzine DePaul William Sr. averaged 15.3 ppg in 1954-55 and 1955-56. William Jr. averaged 16.6 ppg and 11.4 rpg from 1972-73 through 1974-75, including team highs of 19.4 ppg and 13.5 rpg as a senior.
11. Young Houston Michael, an All-American as a senior, was top scorer for back-to-back Final Four teams featuring Akeem Olajuwon (1983 and 1984), averaging 18.6 ppg over final two years. Joseph averaged 14.8 ppg, 3.5 rpg and 2.4 apg in 2011-12 and 2012-13 with UH before transferring to Oregon.
12. Warren North Carolina State Tony Sr. averaged 9.3 ppg and 4.3 rpg from 1976-77 through 1978-79 under coach Norm Sloan, leading Wolfpack in field-goal percentage as junior. Tony "T.J." Jr. was an All-American and ACC Player of the Year as sophomore in 2013-14 before declaring early for NBA draft.
13. Price Oklahoma Dennis averaged 10.9 ppg from 1957-58 through 1959-60. Brent averaged 18 ppg and 5.8 apg for the Sooners in 1990-91 and 1991-92 after transferring from South Carolina.
14. Hummer Princeton Edward, a Final Four teammate of All-American Bill Bradley before becoming an All-Ivy League second-team selection, averaged 10.2 ppg and 7 rpg from 1964-65 through 1966-67. Ian, a three-time All-Ivy League selection, averaged 13.2 ppg and 5.9 rpg from 2009-10 through 2012-13.
15. Cox San Francisco Chubby, setting stage for first father-son tandem to both be two-time all-conference selection for same school in same league, averaged team-high 5.4 apg in each of his final two seasons in 1976-77 and 1977-78. John averaged 15.8 ppg and 4.2 rpg from 2001-02 through 2004-05, leading the WCC in scoring as a senior.
16. Evans Oklahoma Eddie averaged 11.9 ppg from 1960-61 through 1962-63, including a team-high 16.4 ppg as a senior. Terry averaged 11.1 ppg and 5.3 apg from 1989-90 through 1992-93, setting school records in assists (628) and three-point field goals (259).
17. Raivio Portland Rick, a three-time All-WCAC selection who led the Pilots in FG% all four seasons, finished as their all-time leading rebounder (910/9.4 rpg) while averaging 17.2 ppg before becoming 1980 fifth-round draft choice by L.A. Lakers. Nik, a J.C. recruit, was an All-WCC selection as a junior in 2008-09 when he averaged 16 ppg and 6.5 rpg before heading overseas to play professionally after concluding his college career with 14.3 ppg and 5.3 rpg.
18. Temple Louisiana State Collis Jr., the first African-American varsity player in LSU history in 1971-72, averaged 10.1 ppg and 8.1 rpg in three seasons, ranking second in SEC in rebounding (11.1 rpg) and seventh in field-goal shooting (54.9%) as a senior. Collis III averaged 10.2 ppg from 1999-00 through 2002-03, including career-high 14.3 ppg as sophomore when he scored 30 points in regular-season finale at Tennessee. Garrett was defensive whiz for 2006 Final Four club before becoming an All-SEC second-team pick as senior in 2008-09.
19. Ainge Brigham Young Danny, a three-time All-American who averaged 20.9 ppg, was named national player of the year as a senior in 1980-81. Austin posted season highs of 9.5 ppg and 4.1 apg as a sophomore in 2004-05 en route to career marks of 6.6 ppg and 3.5 apg.
20. Guokas St. Joseph's Matt Sr. was tallest player and an original member of the famed "Mighty Mites" who asserted themselves in the Philly Big Five by winning 54 of 71 games in the late 1930s. Matt Jr. averaged 15.4 ppg and 4.6 rpg for the Hawks in 1964-65 and 1965-66 after transferring from Miami (Fla.).
21. Komives Bowling Green Howard averaged 25.8 ppg from 1961-62 through 1963-64, leading nation in scoring as senior All-American with 36.7 ppg. Shane averaged 10.6 ppg from 1992-93 through 1995-96, including career-high 14.3 ppg as a sophomore.
22. Ellis San Francisco Joe, a three-time All-WCAC first-team selection from 1963-64 through 1965-66, averaged 13.5 ppg and 8.9 rpg. Kevin averaged 9.1 ppg and 3 rpg his final two seasons in 1988-89 and 1989-90.
23. Springer Iona Gary Sr., a three-time All-MAAC selection, averaged 15.4 ppg and 8.4 rpg from 1980-81 through 1983-84. Gary Jr., an All-MAAC third-team selection as a senior in 2008-09, averaged 7.6 ppg and 5.2 rpg.
24. Becker Arizona State Art, a two-time All-WAC selection, averaged 15.7 ppg and 9 rpg from 1961-62 through 1963-64, ranks among school career leaders in rebound average, FG% (52.4) and FT% (79.7). Teammate of Joe Caldwell had two games with more than 20 points and 20 rebounds as a junior when leading team with 11.2 rpg. Mark averaged 8.8 ppg and 4.8 rpg from 1986-87 through 1989-90, leading team in rebounding as a sophomore with 5.5 per game.
25. Henry Kansas Carl, an OCU transfer, averaged 17.1 ppg and 6.4 rpg in 1982-83 and 1983-84 as a two-time All-Big Eight Conference selection. Xavier, an All-Big 12 Conference Rookie Team choice, averaged 13.4 ppg and 4.4 rpg as freshman in 2009-10 before leaving school early for NBA draft.
26. Frederick South Carolina Zam Sr. led nation in scoring as a senior in 1980-81 with 28.9 ppg to finish career with 13.7 ppg. Zam II, an All-SEC second-team selection as a senior, averaged 15.1 ppg with the Gamecocks in 2007-08 and 2008-09 after transferring from Georgia Tech.
27. Payne Iowa Tom was leading the Hawkeyes in scoring and rebounding at end of first semester of junior season (1956-57) when declared academically ineligible. Michael averaged 9.6 ppg and 7.3 rpg from 1981-82 through 1984-85, pacing team in rebounding his first two seasons.
28. Howard Brigham Young Orin was a multi-sport Hall of Famer for the school in the 1920s. Doug, a second-team All-WAC selection as a junior in 1968-69 (15.4 ppg, 4 rpg, 85.3 FT%) and senior in 1969-70 (18.2 ppg, 5.2 rpg, 85.3 FT%) led Cougars in scoring his last two years.
29. Butler Richmond Jeff, a transfer from Robert Morris (Pa.) when it was a junior college, led UR in scoring and rebounding in 1975-76 and 1976-77, averaging 15.2 ppg and 9.6 rpg. Ryan, a starter much of stint from 2006-07 through 2009-10, finished his career fifth in total steals and three-pointers, averaging 6.6 ppg and 2.8 rpg.
30. Ewing Georgetown Patrick Sr., the national player of the year as a senior, averaged 15.3 ppg and 9.2 rpg from 1981-82 through 1984-85. Patrick Jr. averaged 5.1 ppg and 3.1 rpg with the Hoyas in 2006-07 and 2007-08 after transferring from Indiana.
31. Valentine Michigan State Carlton was the Spartans' leading scorer and rebounder as a senior in 1987-88, finishing his career with 8.5 ppg and 4.1 rpg. Denzel averaged 6.2 ppg and 5 rpg for NCAA playoff teams in 2012-13 and 2013-14.
32. Stockton Gonzaga John, MVP of the WCAC as a senior, averaged 12.5 ppg and 5.2 apg from 1980-81 through 1983-84. David averaged 4.6 ppg and 2.9 apg for four NCAA playoff teams from 2010-11 through 2013-14.
33. Mimlitz St. Louis Jack, a two-time All-Missouri Valley Conference selection, averaged 14.2 ppg from 1955-56 through 1957-58. Ted averaged 7 ppg for SLU in 1985-86 and 1986-87 after transferring from Missouri.
34. Morningstar Kansas Roger, runner-up in scoring for a Final Four squad, averaged 11.7 ppg and 4.8 rpg in 1973-74 and 1974-75 after transferring from a junior college. Brady averaged 5.6 ppg, 2.3 rpg and 2.6 apg from 2006-07 through 2010-11.
35. Shepherd Butler Bill Sr. averaged 5.9 ppg in 1947-48 and 6.6 ppg in 1948-49. Billy Jr., who scored 49 points in a game at Arizona as a junior, averaged 24.1 ppg from 1969-70 through 1971-72 (career-low senior mark of 19.3 ppg while contributing team-high 5.8 apg).
36. Fife Michigan Dan averaged 12.6 ppg and 4.9 rpg from 1968-69 through 1970-71. Dugan, a backup on the last Fab Five Final Four team, averaged 4.6 ppg and 2 rpg from 1992-93 through 1995-96.
37. Suttle Pepperdine Dane Sr., co-MVP of the WCAC as a senior, averaged 16.2 ppg from 1979-80 through 1982-83 before playing briefly in NBA. Dane Jr. averaged 5.6 ppg from 2009-10 through 2011-12.
38. Rose Houston Lynden, a J.C. recruit who became co-captain of 1982 Final Four squad, averaged 7.5 ppg and 3.3 apg. L.J. averaged 8.1 ppg and 5.1 apg as a UH sophomore in 2013-14 after transferring from Baylor.
39. Wilkins Illinois State Jeff averaged 16.4 ppg and 9.8 rpg from 1974-75 through 1976-77, leading team in scoring, rebounding and FG% as a senior before becoming an NBA second-round draft choice. John, a J.C. transfer, averaged 7.1 ppg and 3.8 rpg from 2010-11 through 2012-13.
40. Whitehead Louisville Eddie averaged 5.8 ppg and 5.2 rpg from 1963-64 through 1965-66, finishing runner-up in rebounding behind All-American Wes Unseld as a senior. Luke averaged 9.1 ppg and 3.8 rpg from 2000-01 through 2003-04, including NCAA playoff squads his final two seasons (leading rebounder and runner-up in scoring as senior).
41. Mills Kentucky Terry averaged 6.7 ppg for three NCAA Tournament teams from 1968-69 through 1970-71. Cameron, who averaged 4.3 ppg from 1994-95 through 1996-97, led UK in three-point FG% as a junior when he averaged 11.8 ppg in the NCAA playoffs.
42. Sutton Oklahoma State Eddie averaged 6.6 ppg and 2.6 rpg while shooting 82.1% from free-throw line in the late 1950s. Sean, pacing the Pokes in assists and three-point shooting both seasons, averaged 11 ppg, 2.5 rpg and 4.4 apg in 1990-91 and 1991-92 for two NCAA playoff teams after transferring from UK.
43. Melchionni Duke Gary averaged 10.4 ppg and 2.7 rpg from 1970-71 through 1972-73. Lee averaged 4.5 ppg and 2.2 rpg while shooting 35.9% from beyond the arc from 2002-03 through 2005-06.
44. Altenberger Illinois Bill averaged 7.7 ppg from 1954-55 through 1956-57. Doug averaged 9.6 ppg from 1982-83 through 1986-87, including 13.6 ppg as a senior when he was an All-Big Ten third-team selection.
45. McElwain Stanford Les played in early 1930s. Mal averaged 10.9 ppg and 6.3 rpg as a three-year starting forward in late 1960s.
46. Urzetta St. Bonaventure Sam, who led the nation in FT% as a sophomore and senior, averaged 6.2 ppg from 1946-47 through 1949-50. Nick averaged 8.7 ppg in late 1970s.
47. Vopicka Illinois James was second-leading scorer in 1935-36 and a starter on 1936-37 club tying for Big Ten title. Jim averaged 5.7 ppg in 1963-64 and 3.8 ppg in 1964-65.
48. Christensen Brigham Young Harold, a member of 1951 NIT championship team, averaged 7.8 ppg and 4.4 rpg before he was chosen by the Minneapolis Lakers in 1953 NBA draft. Todd averaged 5.8 ppg in 1995-96, 1998-99 and 1999-00.
49. Parkinson Purdue Bruce, an All-Big Ten first-team selection as a junior, averaged 10.9 ppg and 4.3 rpg from 1972-73 through 1976-77. Austin averaged 2.2 ppg and 3.2 apg from 2000-01 through 2003-04.
T50. Hall Vanderbilt Jerry Don averaged 6.3 ppg and 1.7 rpg from 1960-61 through 1962-63. Dan, who led Vandy in rebounding as a sophomore, averaged 7.1 ppg and 4.7 rpg in 1989-90 and from 1991-92 through 1993-94.
T50. Craig Brigham Young Robert, a member of 1951 NIT titlist, averaged 3.5 ppg in 1949-50 and 1950-51. Steve, a teammate of All-American Danny Ainge, averaged 7.2 ppg and 2.5 rpg in 1975-76 and from 1978-79 through 1980-81.

Family Feud: Pitinos Join Diddles as Only Father-Son Combos Meeting > Once

When Minnesota (coached by son Richard Pitino) opposed Louisville (coached by father Rick Pitino) in their season opener at Puerto Rico, you almost knew the result in advance. But the meeting deserved acknowledgment if only because father-son coaching duels are rare events in NCAA annals. Until this year, the only father-son tandem to oppose each other more than once at the NCAA Division I level was Ed Diddle Sr. (Western Kentucky) and Ed Diddle Jr. (Middle Tennessee State) when they were Ohio Valley Conference rivals.

The Diddle duo combined for 815 victories in their college coaching careers but eight other family combinations boast more triumphs. The Suttons (father Eddie and sons Scott and Sean) are atop this list and surpassed the 1,100-win plateau.

Fathers know best insofar as dads won 16 of the first 18 family-feud games in the wake of Louisville leveling Minnesota, 81-68. Following is a chronological list of the first six coaching matchups involving fathers and sons of Division I schools (father listed first):

Ed Diddle Sr., Western Kentucky (11) vs.
Ed Diddle Jr., Middle Tennessee State (1)

Jan. 30, 1957 (Western Kentucky, 79-72)
March 2, 1957 (Western Kentucky, 86-82)
Jan. 23, 1958 (Western Kentucky, 69-67)
Feb. 18, 1958 (Middle Tennessee State, 81-75)
Jan. 19, 1959 (Western Kentucky, 89-65)
Feb. 28, 1959 (Western Kentucky, 110-85)
Feb. 6, 1960 (Western Kentucky, 109-89)
Feb. 27, 1960 (Western Kentucky, 109-80)
Dec. 1, 1960 (Western Kentucky, 70-67)
Feb. 27, 1961 (Western Kentucky, 84-73)
Jan. 20, 1962 (Western Kentucky, 89-69)
Feb. 13, 1962 (Western Kentucky, 87-81)

Ray Meyer, DePaul (1) vs.
Tom Meyer, Illinois-Chicago Circle (0)

Dec. 1, 1981 (DePaul, 78-53)

Butch van Breda Kolff, Hofstra (0) vs.
Jan van Breda Kolff, Cornell (1)

Jan. 12, 1993 (Cornell, 70-56)

Hugh Durham, Georgia (1) vs.
Doug Durham, Georgia Southern (0)

Nov. 28, 1994 (Georgia, 87-57)

Nolan Richardson Jr., Arkansas (1) vs.
Nolan Richardson III, Tennessee State (0)

Nov. 17, 2000 (Arkansas, 90-68)

Rick Pitino, Louisville (2) vs.
Richard Pitino, Florida International/Minnesota (0)

Dec. 19, 2012 (Louisville, 79-55)
Nov. 14, 2014 (Louisville, 81-68)

NOTE: NAIA affiliate Quincy College (coached by father Sherrill Hanks) lost at Samford (coached by son Mike Hanks), 99-92 in overtime, on December 21, 1982.

Final Four Curse: Former UCLA Forward Gavin Smith is Latest Example

Is there a Final Four curse? That's a topic for ESPN talking heads to debate in its family feud although Bill Simmons might know just a mite more about basketball than concussion-ravaged Mike Golic. At any rate, the remains of former UCLA forward Gavin Smith, who scored 14 points for the third-place Bruins at the 1976 Final Four, were found in a rural desert area of Southern California in the latest of what could be considered the Final Four curse. Police had been probing Smith's mysterious disappearance 2 1/2 years ago. Smith, a 57-year-old movie executive for Fox, was driving a black 2000 four-door Mercedes E Class when he vanished at night.

Smith, whose son (Evan) played for Southern California, didn't participate at either the 1974 or 1975 Final Fours before transferring from the Bruins' bench to becoming one of the NCAA's top scorers. Most media outlets focus on Smith's connection to UCLA but he actually made a hoop name for himself playing with Hawaii, where he finished 16th in the nation in scoring in 1976-77 by setting a Rainbows' single-season record (23.4 points per game).

Smith's vehicle was recovered at a storage facility in Simi Valley linked to an individual incarcerated on an unrelated narcotics conviction. Smith reportedly met in some sort of rehab therapy the wife of an admitted middleman in L.A.'s illicit drug world. Speaking with Inside Edition, Smith's wife opened up about her husband's extramarital affairs and his history of drug use.

Ranging from famous military battles to freak circumstances to mysterious disappearances to nuclear bombs to suicides, the existence of a Final Four curse is debatable although there is no denying that a striking number of prominent national semifinal players died prematurely. For instance, Sid Tanenbaum, the second-leading scorer for NYU's 1945 national runner-up, was murdered on September 4, 1986, at the age of 60 when stabbed to death by a local woman in his Queens machine shop. According to police reports, Tanenbaum was assaulted because he chose to stop lending money to his attacker after previously assisting her numerous times.

Any tribute isn't enough when a man is buried before his time. The following list of additional Final Four players (cited chronologically) passed away early (before reaching 60), but the deceased left lasting memories:

  • Three of Oregon's starting five on the first NCAA championship team in 1939 - guards Bobby Anet and Wally Johansen and center Slim Wintermute - all died in their 40s. Wintermute disappeared in Lake Washington in 1977, a case that never has been solved.

  • Center Bill Menke, the third-leading scorer for Indiana's 1940 NCAA champion who supplied a team-high 10 points in the Hoosiers' national semifinal victory over Duquesne, later became a Navy pilot and served in World War II. In January 1945, he was declared missing in action (and presumed dead) when he didn't return from a flight in the Caribbean.

  • Thomas P. Hunter, a three-year letterman who was a sophomore member of Kansas' 1940 runner-up, was killed in action against the Japanese on Guam, July 21, 1944, while fighting with the Ninth Marines as a first lieutenant. Hunter was elected posthumously as captain of the Jayhawks' 1945-46 squad that compiled a 19-2 record.

  • Dale Gentry, the fifth-leading scorer for Washington State's 1941 national runner-up, collapsed and died of a heart attack in 1963 at the age of 50 after completing arrangements for his 16-year-old son's funeral following injuries incurred in an auto accident.

  • All 11 regulars on Pitt's 1941 Final Four team participated in World War II and one of them, guard Bob Artman, was killed in action.

  • Center Ed Voss, the second-leading scorer for 1942 champion Stanford, died of polio in 1953 at the age of 31, a month after his 7-year-old son also succumbed to the disease. Cardinal teammate Jack Dana's wife, California socialite Renee Cohu, died of a sleeping pill overdose in the winter of 1970 at the age of 42 when the missing daughter of a former TWA president was found in a Miami Beach motel.

  • Charles "Stubbie" Pearson, captain of Dartmouth's 1942 national runner-up and valedictorian of his class the same year, was killed in action on March 30, 1945, while dive-bombing a Japanese ship off the Palau Islands. He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Teammate George Galbraith Jr., a backup forward, died in a training flight over Mississippi.

  • Three of the top seven scorers for Kentucky's first NCAA Tournament and Final Four team in 1942 died during World War II - Mel Brewer (Army second lieutenant/25 years old in France), Ken England (Army captain of ski troop/23 in Italy) and Jim King (Army second lieutenant and co-pilot/24 in Germany).

  • Bob Doll, a starter for Colorado in 1942, died in 1959 at the age of 40 of an apparent suicide.

  • Milo Komenich, leading scorer for Wyoming's 1943 NCAA titlist, died in 1977 at his home at the age of 56.

  • Georgetown's Lloyd Potolicchio, who matched DePaul legend George Mikan's 11-point output in the 1943 national semifinals when the Hoyas eliminated the Blue Demons before bowing to Wyoming in title tilt, joined the Air Force. Potolicchio was boom operator Master Sergeant when killed in a refueling mission on January 17, 1966, in a B-52 crash off the coast of southern Spain. His KC-135 tanker was completely destroyed when its fuel load ignited, resulting in the B-52G breaking apart with B28RI hydrogen weapons falling to earth and plutonium contamination occurring near the fishing village of Palomares. In March 2009, Time magazine identified the Palomares accident as one of the world's "worst nuclear disasters." Teammate Bob Duffey, a backup swingman, was killed on November 13, 1944, in European theater combat.

  • Curtis Popham, Texas' co-captain in 1943, was one of seven Longhorns lettermen since the mid-1930s to make the supreme sacrifice during WWII.

  • Swingman Johnny Jorgensen, a teammate of Hall of Famer George Mikan on DePaul's 1943 Final Four team, died in mid-January 1973 at the age of 51.

  • All-American Audie Brindley of 1944 runner-up Dartmouth died of cancer in 1957 at the age of 33.

  • Swingman Joe Bradley, a regular for Oklahoma A&M's 1946 NCAA champion, was 58 when he died on June 5, 1987.

  • Center Jack Underman, the leading scorer for Ohio State's 1946 national third-place team, was an oral surgeon in Elyria, Ohio, when he died in an auto crash on October 23, 1969, at the age of 44.

  • Frontcourter Frank Oftring, a key contributor for Holy Cross' 1947 champion and 1948 national third-place team, died on October 4, 1982, at the age of 58. Teammate Bob Curran, a regular for both squads, was 56 when he passed away on October 18, 1977.

  • Center Gerry Tucker, the leading scorer for Oklahoma's 1947 national runner-up, died on May 29, 1979, at the age of 57.

  • Forward Tom Hamilton, a regular as a freshman forward with Texas' 1947 national third-place club, died at the age of 48 on November 29, 1973, after suffering a brain hemorrhage prior to officiating a high school football game in Tyler, Tex. Hamilton, a first baseman briefly with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1952 and 1953, served as baseball coach and athletic director for St. Edward's (Tex.) at the time of his death.

  • Jim Krebs, the leading scorer and rebounder for Southern Methodist's 1956 Final Four squad, was killed in 1965 at the age of 30 in a freak accident. While helping a neighbor clear storm damage, a tree limb fell the wrong way and crushed his skull.

  • Gary Bradds, a backup to national player of the year Jerry Lucas for Ohio State's 1962 NCAA runner-up before earning the same award himself two years later, died of cancer in July 1983 when he was 40. Bradds was principal of an elementary school in Bowersville, Ohio, at the time of his death.

  • Bill Buntin, the leading rebounder and second-leading scorer (behind Cazzie Russell) for Michigan's Final Four teams in 1964 and 1965, collapsed and died during an informal workout one day after his 26th birthday in May 1968.

  • Dave Sorenson, second-leading rebounder and third-leading scorer as a sophomore for Ohio State's national third-place team in 1968, died in 2002 at the age of 54 because of cancer.

  • Ken Spain and Theodis Lee, starting frontcourters with All-America Elvin Hayes for Houston's team that entered the 1968 Final Four with an undefeated record, died of cancer. Spain, who overcame cancer after he was first diagnosed with it in 1977, died of the disease 13 years later in October 1990 when he was 44. Lee, who played for the Harlem Globetrotters, was 33 when he passed away in March 1979, one week after the illness was diagnosed.

  • Herm Gilliam, leading rebounder and second-leading scorer for Purdue's 1969 national runner-up, died of a heart attack in 2005 at the age of 58.

  • Steve Patterson, one of UCLA's top three rebounders for NCAA kingpins in 1970 and 1971 after serving as Lew Alcindor's understudy for another titlist in 1969, died in 2004 at the age of 56 because of lung cancer.

  • Maurice Lucas, leading scorer and rebounder for Marquette's 1974 national runner-up, died in 2010 at the age of 58 from bladder cancer.

  • Danny Knight, the leading scorer and rebounder for Kansas' 1974 Final Four team, was 24 when he died in June 1977, three weeks after sustaining injuries in a fall down the steps at his home. Knight had been suffering headaches for some time and doctors attributed his death to an aneurysm in the brain. Teammate Norm Cook, the Jayhawks' second-leading rebounder and fourth-leading scorer as a freshman, was 53 in 2008 when he died after suffering from paranoid schizophrenia most of his adult life.

  • Dan Hall, a frontcourt backup from Kentucky's historic recruiting class as a freshman for UK's 1975 NCAA Tournament runner-up, died of an apparent suicide at age 58 the first full week in January 2013. Hall subsequently transferred to Marshall, where he averaged 10.4 ppg and 5.6 rpg in 1976-77 and 1977-78.

  • Center Jerome Whitehead, the second-leading rebounder and third-leading scorer for Marquette's 1977 NCAA titlist, was 56 in mid-December 2012 when he was found dead because of chronic alcohol abuse. Teammate Gary Rosenberger, a guard who was the fourth-leading scorer in coach Al McGuire's swan song, passed away in the fall of 2013 at the age of 57 due to complications from a heart attack and stroke.

  • Guard Chad Kinch, the third-leading scorer for UNC Charlotte's 1977 Final Four team as a freshman, died at his parents' home in Cartaret, N.J., from complications caused by AIDS. He passed away on April 3, 1994, the day between the Final Four semifinals and final in Charlotte. The host school happened to be UNC Charlotte. It was the second time Kinch's parents lost a son. Sixteen years earlier, Ray Kinch, a Rutgers football player, was killed in a house fire.

  • Forward Glen Gondrezick, the leading rebounder and third-leading scorer for UNLV's 1977 third-place club, died in late April 2009 at the age of 53 due to complications stemming from a heart transplant he received the previous September.

  • Center Lewis Brown, the third-leading rebounder and sixth-leading scorer for UNLV's 1977 national third-place team, spent more than 10 years homeless on the streets of Santa Monica, Calif., before passing away in mid-September 2011 at the age of 56. According to the New York Times, family members said he used cocaine with the Rebels. "Drugs were his downfall," said his sister.

  • Murray State transfer Larry Moffett, the second-leading rebounder for UNLV's 1977 national third-place team, passed away in early May 2011 in Shreveport, La., at the age of 56. He previously was a cab driver in Las Vegas.

  • Point guard John Harrell, a point guard for Duke's 1978 runner-up after transferring from North Carolina Central, died of an aortal aneurysm at age 50 in the summer of 2008.

  • Orlando Woolridge, a backup freshman in 1978 when Notre Dame made its lone Final Four appearance before he became a scoring specialist in 13 NBA seasons, died at the end of May 2012 at the age of 52 because of a chronic heart condition.

  • Matt White, the second-leading rebounder and third-leading scorer for Penn's 1979 Final Four squad as a senior, was fatally stabbed in mid-February 2013 by his wife, who told police she had caught him looking at child pornography. White, the Quakers' all-time leader in field-goal shooting (59.1%), was 55.

  • Derek Smith, the leading rebounder and second-leading scorer as a sophomore forward for Louisville's 1980 NCAA champion, died of a heart ailment at age 34 on August 9, 1996, while on a cruise with his family. He was the leading scorer and second-leading rebounder for the Cardinals' 1982 Final Four team before averaging 12.8 ppg and 3.2 rpg in the NBA with five different franchises. His son, Nolan, became a starting guard for Duke's 2010 NCAA titlist.

  • Rob Williams, leading scorer for Houston's 1982 Final Four team, died of congestive heart failure at the age of 52 in March 2014 after suffering a stroke 15 years earlier that left him blind in his left eye and partially paralyzed on his left side. Williams denied rumors he was too high on cocaine to play up to par against North Carolina in the national semifinals (0-for-8 field-goal shooting). But Williams admitted he used drugs. "Cocaine came later but I started out smoking weed (in junior high)," Williams said. "I was always a curious type of fellow, so I wanted to see what cocaine was about. So I tried it. And to tell you the truth, I liked it."

  • Lorenzo Charles, the second-leading rebounder for N.C. State's 1983 champion, provided one of the tourney's most memorable moments with a game-winning dunk against heavily-favored Houston in the final. Working for a limousine and bus company based in Apex, N.C., he was killed in June 2011 when the charter bus the 47-year-old was driving with no passengers aboard crashed along Interstate 40 in Raleigh.

  • Melvin Turpin, the leading scorer and second-leading rebounder as a senior for Kentucky's 1984 Final Four team (29-5 record), was 49 and battling diabetes in July 2010 when he committed suicide with a self-inflicted gunshot to the chest.

  • Baskerville Holmes, a starting forward who averaged 9.6 points and 5.9 rebounds per game for Memphis State's 1985 Final Four team, and his girlfriend were found shot to death on March 18, 1997 in an apparent murder-suicide in Memphis. He was 32.

  • Swingman Don Redden, who averaged 13 points and 4.8 rebounds per game for Louisiana State's 1986 Final Four squad, was 24 when he died in March 1988 of heart disease.

  • Armen Gilliam, the leading scorer and rebounder for UNLV's 1987 Final Four team, died on July 5, 2011, while playing basketball in a Pittsburgh area gym. He was 47.

  • Guard Phil Henderson, the leading scorer and senior captain of Duke's 1990 NCAA Tournament runner-up, died of cardiac arrest in mid-February 2013 at his home in the Philippines at the age of 44. He was the Blue Devils' second-leading scorer as a junior and sixth-leading scorer as a sophomore for two more Final Four squads.

  • Larry Marks, a backup forward for Arkansas' 1990 Final Four squad after being a starter the previous season, died of an apparent heart attack in mid-June 2000 after playing some recreational basketball. He was 33.

  • Sean Tunstall, a reserve guard for Kansas' 1991 NCAA Tournament runner-up was shot and killed at age 28 in the parking lot of a recreation center in his native St. Louis on October 16, 1997, in a drug deal gone bad. Tunstall, recruited to KU when Larry Brown was the Jayhawks' coach, had received a prison sentence after pleading guilty to one count of selling cocaine in 1993. "He was one of the few kids I never thought I completely reached," then KU coach Roy Williams said.

  • Peter Sauer, a captain and third-leading rebounder for Stanford's 1998 Final Four squad, was 35 when he collapsed during a recreation game in White Plains, N.Y., hit his head and never was revived. His father, Mark Sauer, is a former president of two pro franchises - the NHL's St. Louis Blues and MLB's Pittsburgh Pirates.

All-Conference Dry Spell: New Big Ten Member Rutgers in Knightmare Rut

Rutgers might need to visit its archives and bring Dick Vitale back as a recruiter. The Scarlet Knights have fallen on hard times and are the nation's only NCAA Division I school not to have an all-conference choice in the previous eight seasons. Vitale helped lure diploma-less coach Eddie Jordan to Piscataway before the Scarlet Knights reached the 1976 Final Four.

Rutgers, failing to secure an all-league choice since Quincy Douby in 2005-06, is headed for its third alliance in as many campaigns. The Knights' arrival gives the Big Ten Conference additional Nebraska/Northwestern/Penn State mediocrity - a famine-relief trio combining for three NCAA playoff victories in previous 59 years (all by Nittany Lions).

Five struggling schools - Louisiana-Monroe (Sun Belt), Pepperdine (WCC), Sacramento State (Big Sky), Southern Illinois (Missouri Valley) and Texas Tech (Big 12) - left this dubious category in 2013-14. Rutgers, eliminated by Louisville by 61 points in the AAC Tournament last season, is joined by DePaul and Samford on the following list of schools enduring honor droughts having no all-league picks at least the past six seasons:

School Conference(s) Last All-League Selection
DePaul Big East Sr. G Draelon Burns in 2007-08 (2nd team)
Rutgers Big East/American Athletic Jr. G Quincy Douby in 2005-06 (1st team)
Samford Ohio Valley Sr. C Travis Peterson in 2007-08 (2nd team)

Left Behind: Barnes, Donovan and Ryan Never Been Named National COY

"It is better to be looked over than overlooked." - Mae West

It doesn't seem possible, but Rick Barnes (Texas), Billy Donovan (Florida) and Bo Ryan (Wisconsin) never have been anointed as national coach of the year by a major award despite being the all-time winningest coaches for their respective power conference schools. Enhancing their prospects for placement on a pedestal this campaign is recognition among the AP preseason Top 10 teams.

Maryland named its court after Gary Williams, the school's all-time winningest coach who guided the Terrapins to the 2002 NCAA title during a span when he became the only mentor ever to defeat the nation's top-ranked team in four straight seasons (2000-01 through 2003-04). Surprisingly, Williams never was courted as national coach of the year by one of the major awards, joining Donovan (back-to-back titles in 2006 and 2007) and other NCAA championship coaches such as Denny Crum, Joe B. Hall, Don Haskins, Rollie Massimino and Jim Valvano "shorted" by this dubious distinction.

Does this blemish exist because of envious fellow coaches or the media in dire need of brain scans? A total of 17 individuals received acclaim as national COY despite never reaching an NCAA playoff regional final - Rod Barnes, Tony Bennett, Mike Brey, Perry Clark, Jim Crews, Keno Davis, Matt Doherty, Cliff Ellis, Eddie Fogler, Frank Haith, Leonard Hamilton, Marv Harshman, Todd Lickliter, George Raveling, Al Skinner, Charlie Spoonhour and Dick Versace. Following is an alphabetical list of high-profile retired coaches who never received one of the five major national coach of the year awards since 1955 despite their significant achievements:

Dave Bliss - Compiled a total of 14 20-win seasons with three different schools.

Dale Brown - Led LSU to 15 consecutive postseason tournaments (1979 through 1993) en route to becoming the second-winningest coach in SEC history at the time (behind Adolph Rupp) in both overall and SEC games.

Vic Bubas - Guided Duke to NCAA Tournament Final Four appearances three times in a four-year span from 1963 through 1966.

Pete Carril - Never incurred a losing record in 29 seasons with Princeton from 1968 through 1996.

Gale Catlett - Went his first 23 seasons without a losing record with Cincinnati and West Virginia; participated in nine consecutive national postseason tournaments in the 1980s.

Denny Crum - Won 15 regular-season conference championships in the Missouri Valley and Metro in his first 23 seasons with Louisville; only coach to twice win conference and NCAA tournaments in the same year (1980 and 1986).

Don DeVoe - Compiled a total of 12 20-win seasons with three different schools.

Don Donoher - One of first 10 coaches to take his first three teams to the NCAA playoffs guided his first seven Dayton clubs to national postseason competition; posted double digits in victories all 25 seasons.

Lefty Driesell - One of only three different coaches to guide four different schools to the NCAA playoffs; captured conference tournament titles in four different leagues; only coach to win more than 100 games for four different schools en route to total of 786 victories; had 14 final Top 20 rankings.

Hugh Durham - One of only three coaches in NCAA history to win at least 225 games for two Division I schools, directing both Florida State and Georgia to the Final Four.

Bill C. Foster - Only six losing records in 25 seasons at the Division I level with UNC Charlotte, Clemson, Miami (FL) and Virginia Tech.

Jack Gardner - Only coach to direct two different schools to the Final Four at least twice apiece.

Pete Gillen - Remarkable run with Xavier (winning five Midwestern Collegiate Conference Tournament titles in six-year span from 1986 through 1991) before posting 20-win seasons with Providence in the Big East and Virginia in the ACC.

Joe B. Hall - Averaged 23 victories annually in 13 seasons with Kentucky, reaching championship game in either NCAA Tournament or NIT three times in a four-year span from 1975 through 1978.

Don Haskins - Captured four Western Athletic Conference Tournament championships with Texas-El Paso in a seven-year span from 1984 through 1990 while winning more than 20 games each of those seasons; compiled a total of 17 20-win campaigns.

Lou Henson - Compiled only one losing record in his last 22 years with Illinois and New Mexico State; finished in first division of the Big Ten Conference nine straight seasons.

Terry Holland - Averaged 20 victories annually in 21 seasons with Davidson and Virginia.

Harry Litwack - Finished third with Temple in three consecutive national postseason tournaments (1956 and 1958 in NCAA and 1957 in NIT). Posted only one losing record in 21 seasons with the Owls through 1973.

Rollie Massimino - Averaged more than 20 victories annually in the 1980s; participated in 14 consecutive national postseason tournaments with Villanova and UNLV before coaching at small-school level in Florida.

Ray Mears - Finished lower than third place in SEC standings with Tennessee just once in his final 14 seasons from 1964 through 1977.

Shelby Metcalf - Averaged 18.6 victories annually with Texas A&M in an 18-year span from 1971-72 through 1988-89.

Eldon Miller - Won more than 20 games with three different DI schools (Western Michigan, Ohio State and Northern Iowa).

Joe Mullaney - Reached the 20-win plateau nine straight seasons from 1958-59 through 1966-67, directing Providence to the NIT semifinals four times in the first five years of that stretch; won more than two-thirds of his games with the Friars decided by fewer than five points.

C.M. Newton - Posted at least 22 victories with Alabama six times in the last seven seasons of the 1970s.

Dave Odom - Won 20 or more games 10 times in a 14-year span from 1992-93 through 2005-06 with Wake Forest and South Carolina.

Ted Owens - Finished first or second in Big Eight Conference standings each of his first seven seasons with Kansas from 1965 through 1971.

Tom Penders - Won at least 20 games with three different schools (Rhode Island, Texas and George Washington) a total of 10 times in a 13-year span from 1987 through 1999 before winning more than 20 games three times in six seasons with Houston.

Jack Ramsay - Worst record in 11 seasons with St. Joseph's was an 18-10 mark.

Wimp Sanderson - Won five SEC Tournament titles with Alabama, including three in a row from 1989 through 1991.

Fred Schaus - Won Southern Conference Tournament championships each of his six seasons with West Virginia from 1955 through 1960 before posting winning records in Big Ten competition all six years with Purdue.

Roy Skinner - Compiled only one losing record in 16 seasons with Vanderbilt.

Billy Tubbs - Directed Oklahoma to 12 consecutive 20-win seasons, a Big Eight Conference best; took the Sooners to national postseason play his last 13 years with them before moving on to TCU and Lamar.

Jim Valvano - Guided Iona to a school-record 29 victories in 1979-80 before winning at least 18 games each of his last nine seasons with North Carolina State from 1982 through 1990.

Gary Williams - All-time winningest coach for Maryland directed 13 teams to Top 20 finishes in final polls, including a couple of them with Boston College.

Ned Wulk - All-time winningest coach for Arizona State finished atop conference standings in six of his first seven seasons with the Sun Devils.

Misplaced Priorities: Could Kentucky Fall Out of Final AP Poll 3rd Year in Row?

Which will be the next touted team failing to live up to enormous preseason hype? There has been an average of one such squad fall in that dubious category each year thus far this century. It doesn't seem possible, but could Kentucky under John Calipari dramatically disappoint for the third consecutive campaign if the Wildcats' flaunted freshmen flop? Or could Arizona, Duke, Kansas and Wisconsin be knocked off their preseason pedestals?

The last 21 squads in this great-expectations category incurred at least double digits in defeats. Following is a chronological list of the first 25 teams that were preseason Top 5 selections since 1968-69 but finished out of the AP's final Top 20 poll:

Preseason Top 5 Team Season Preseason AP Ranking Coach Record Top Players For Disappointing Squad
Notre Dame 1968-69 4th Johnny Dee 20-7 Austin Carr, Bob Arnzen, Bob Whitmore, Dwight Murphy, Collis Jones and Sid Catlett
Purdue 1969-70 3rd George King 18-6 Rick Mount, Larry Weatherford, George Faerber, Bob Ford, William Franklin and Tyrone Bedford
Southern California 1971-72 3rd Bob Boyd 16-10 Paul Westphal, Joe Mackey, Ron Riley, Dan Anderson and Mike Westra
Florida State 1972-73 2nd Hugh Durham 18-8 Reggie Royals, Lawrence McCray, Otis Cole, Benny Clyde and Otis Johnson
Indiana 1976-77 5th Bob Knight 14-13 Kent Benson, Mike Woodson, Wayne Radford and Derek Holcomb
Kansas 1978-79 5th Ted Owens 18-11 Darnell Valentine, Paul Mokeski, John Crawford, Wilmore Fowler and Tony Guy
DePaul 1984-85 3rd Joey Meyer 19-10 Tyrone Corbin, Kenny Patterson, Dallas Comegys, Marty Embry, Tony Jackson and Kevin Holmes
Indiana 1984-85 4th Bob Knight 19-14 Steve Alford, Uwe Blab, Stew Robinson, Dan Dakich, Delray Brooks and Daryl Thomas
Louisville 1986-87 2nd Denny Crum 18-14 Herbert Crook, Pervis Ellison, Tony Kimbro, Mark McSwain, Keith Williams, Kenny Payne and Felton Spencer
Michigan State 1990-91 4th Jud Heathcote 19-11 Steve Smith, Matt Steigenga, Mike Peplowski and Mark Montgomery
Clemson 1997-98 5th Rick Barnes 18-14 Greg Buckner, Terrell McIntyre, Harold Jamison and Tony Christie
Auburn 1999-00 4th Cliff Ellis 24-10 Chris Porter, Doc Robinson, Scott Pohlman, Daymeon Fishback, Mamadou N'diaye and Mack McGadney
UCLA 2001-02 5th Steve Lavin 21-12 Jason Kapono, Billy Knight, Matt Barnes, Dan Gadzuric and T.J. Cummings
Arizona 2003-04 4th Lute Olson 20-10 Hassan Adams, Salim Stoudamire, Channing Frye, Andre Iguodala and Mustafa Shakur
Michigan State 2003-04 3rd Tom Izzo 18-12 Paul Davis, Chris Hill, Kelvin Torbert, Maurice Ager and Alan Anderson
Missouri 2003-04 5th Quin Snyder 16-14 Arthur Johnson, Rickey Paulding, Linas Kleiza, Jimmy McKinney, Travon Bryant and Jason Conley
Georgia Tech 2004-05 3rd Paul Hewitt 20-12 Jarrett Jack, B.J. Elder, Will Bynum, Luke Schenscher and Isma'll Muhammad
Michigan State 2005-06 4th Tom Izzo 22-12 Maurice Ager, Paul Davis, Shannon Brown and Drew Neitzel
Louisiana State 2006-07 5th John Brady 17-15 Glen Davis, Tasmin Mitchell, Terry Martin, Garrett Temple and Darnell Lazare
Texas 2009-10 3rd Rick Barnes 24-10 Damion James, Avery Bradley, Dexter Pittman, J'Covan Brown, Gary Johnson and Dogus Balbay
Kansas State 2010-11 3rd Frank Martin 23-11 Jacob Pullen, Rodney McGruder, Curtis Kelly and Jamar Samuels
Michigan State 2010-11 2nd Tom Izzo 19-15 Kalin Lucas, Draymond Green, Durrell Summers, Delvon Roe and Keith Appling
Connecticut 2011-12 4th Jim Calhoun 20-14 Andre Drummond, Jeremy Lamb, Ryan Boatright, Alex Oriakhi, Shabazz Napier, Roscoe Smith and Tony Olander
Kentucky 2012-13 3rd John Calipari 21-12 Willie Cauley-Stein, Archie Goodwin, Ryan Harrow, Julius Mays, Nerlens Noel, Alex Poythress and Kyle Wiltjer
Kentucky 2013-14 1st John Calipari 29-11 Willie Cauley-Stein, Aaron Harrison, Andrew Harrison, Dakari Johnson, Marcus Lee, Alex Poythress, Julius Randle and James Young

Undergraduate Odds Against Top-Ranked Kentucky Returning to Final Four

Each Final Four since 1995 had at least one school promptly lose a minimum of one player early to the NBA, including all four participants in 2007 (Florida, Georgetown, Ohio State and UCLA). But what happened to those national semifinal schools such as Kentucky last season that had multiple players declare early for the NBA?

The first 15 "star light" schools with multiple defectors failed to reach an NCAA regional final the next season until Kentucky reversed the trend with a national championship in 2012 after losing Brandon Knight and DeAndre Liggins in 2011. Will UK, after freshmen Julius Randle and James Young were among the top 17 NBA draft choices in 2014, duplicate that feat this campaign? It would have been one of the greatest achievements in college basketball history if UK returned to the 2013 Final Four after losing five undergraduates from the 38-2 NCAA titlist. The perils of losing so much young talent was reflected in the Wildcats' failure to reach the NCAA playoffs and losing in the opening round of the NIT against Robert Morris.

The only team in this category other than UK to lose fewer than seven games was Duke (29-5 in 1999-00). After the first 13 squads thus far this century suffered an average of nine defeats in the wake of such pro defections, Kentucky faces an uphill climb based on the following chronological look at how Final Four schools fared the year after having multiple players renounce their college eligibility:

Year Final Four Team Multiple Undergraduates Lost to NBA Draft Record Postseason Outcome Next Season
1995 Arkansas (2) Scotty Thurman, Corliss Williamson 20-13 Lost regional semifinal
1995 North Carolina (2) Jerry Stackhouse, Rasheed Wallace 21-11 Lost in second round
1996 Mississippi State (2) Erick Dampier, Dontae' Jones 12-18 Did not qualify
1998 North Carolina (2) Vince Carter, Antawn Jamison 24-10 Lost in first round
1999 Duke (3) William Avery, Elton Brand, Corey Maggette 29-5 Lost regional semifinal
2000 Florida (2) Donnell Harvey, Mike Miller 24-7 Lost in second round
2001 Arizona (3) Gilbert Arenas, Richard Jefferson, Michael Wright 24-10 Lost regional semifinal
2001 Michigan State (2) Zach Randolph, Jason Richardson 19-12 Lost in first round
2004 Connecticut (2) Ben Gordon, Emeka Okafor 23-8 Lost in second round
2005 Illinois (2) Dee Brown, Deron Williams 26-7 Lost in second round
2005 North Carolina (4) Raymond Felton, Sean May, Rashad McCants, Marvin Williams 23-8 Lost in second round
2007 Florida (4) Corey Brewer, Taurean Green, Al Horford, Joakim Noah 24-12 Reached NIT semifinals
2007 Ohio State (3) Mike Conley Jr., Daequan Cook, Greg Oden 24-13 Won NIT
2008 Kansas (3) Darrell Arthur, Mario Chalmers, Brandon Rush 27-8 Lost regional semifinal
2008 UCLA (3) Kevin Love, Luc Richard Mbah a Moute, Russell Westbrook 26-9 Lost in second round
2011 Kentucky (2) Brandon Knight, DeAndre Liggins 38-2 Won national title
2012 Kentucky (5) Anthony Davis, Terrence Jones, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Doron Lamb, Marquis Teague 21-12 Lost in NIT first round
2013 Michigan (2) Trey Burke, Tim Hardaway Jr. 28-9 Lost regional final
2014 Kentucky (2) Julius Randle, James Young TBD TBD

NOTE: Arkansas' Scotty Thurman went undrafted in 1995.

On This Date: November Calendar for Notable Games in College Hoops History

Did You Know?: Rick Barnes (Texas), Gene Bartow (UAB), Bob McKillop (Davidson), Mike Montgomery (Stanford) and Bo Ryan (Wisconsin) incurred defeats in their debuts before eventually becoming the all-time winningest coaches for these schools. Check out the following November calendar for memorable games in NCAA major-college history:

NOVEMBER
9 - Brad Stevens made his Butler debut in 2007 with a 61-45 victory at Ball State before guiding the Bulldogs to the NCAA Tournament championship game in back-to-back years in 2010 and 2011. . . . David Holston (43 points vs. St. Bonaventure at Austin, Tex., in 2006) set Chicago State's Division I single-game scoring record. . . . Junior Hairston (21 rebounds vs. Loyola Maryland in 2007) set Towson's Division I single-game rebounding record.
13 - Rotnei Clarke (51 points vs. Alcorn State in 2009) set Arkansas' single-game scoring record before transferring to Butler. . . . Gregg Marshall made his Wichita State debut in 2007 with a 61-56 victory vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff before guiding the Shockers to the 2013 Final Four and becoming national COY in 2014. . . . Siena's school-record 38-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Vermont (80-76 in 2010). . . . Shaka Smart made his VCU coaching debut in 2009 with a 77-51 triumph vs. Bethune-Cookman before directing the Rams to the 2011 Final Four.
14 - Jamie Dixon made his Pittsburgh coaching debut in 2003 with a 71-62 triumph vs. Alabama in New York before becoming national COY in 2009. . . . Larry Eustachy made his Idaho debut in 1990 with an 88-54 victory vs. Simon Fraser before becoming national COY with Iowa State in 2000 and the first coach in NCAA history to compile at least 24 wins in a single season with five different DI schools. . . . Bill Guthridge made his North Carolina debut in 1997 with an 84-56 success vs. Middle Tennessee State en route to becoming the winningest first-year coach in NCAA history and national COY.
15 - Reggie Williams (45 points vs. Virginia Intermont in 2006) set Virginia Military's single-game scoring record.
16 - Al Skinner made his Boston College debut in 1997 with an 87-54 victory vs. Central Connecticut State before going on to become the Eagles' all-time winnningest coach and national COY in 2001.
17 - Rick Barnes made his Texas debut in 1998 with a 71-69 reversal at Houston before going on to become the Longhorns' all-time winningest coach. . . . Bo Ryan made his Wisconsin debut in 2001 with a 74-69 defeat at UNLV before going on to become the Badgers' all-time winningest coach.
18 - Mike Brey made his Notre Dame coaching debut in 2000 with a 104-58 rout of Sacred Heart before becoming national COY in 2011. . . . Jim Larranaga made his George Mason debut in 1997 with a 78-72 victory at Howard University before going on to become the Patriots' all-time winningest coach and guiding them to the 2006 Final Four.
19 - Wisconsin's Frank Kaminsky (43 points vs. North Dakota in 2013/modern-era mark) and Stony Brook's D.J. Munir (36 at Sacred Heart in 2001) set school Division I single-game scoring records.
20 - Okechi Egbe (44 points vs. Bethel in 2000) set Tennessee-Martin's Division I single-game scoring record. . . . Tom Izzo made his Michigan State debut in 1995 with a 69-66 triumph at Chaminade en route to becoming the Spartans' all-time winningest coach. . . . Chicago product Ben Wilson, entering his senior season generally regarded as the nation's premier prospect because of Magic Johnson-like skills, was shot within a block of high school campus and died the next day after bumping into two gang members while walking down the street following lunch break.
21 - Nick Davis (23 rebounds vs. Jackson State in 1997) set Arkansas' single-game rebounding record. . . . Mark Few made his Gonzaga debut in 1999 with a 76-61 triumph at Montana en route to becoming the Zags' all-time winningest coach. . . . Jay Wright made his Villanova coaching debut in 2001 with an 82-68 victory vs. Grambling State before becoming national COY in 2006 and guiding the Wildcats to the 2009 Final Four.
22 - Billy Donovan made his Florida debut in 1996 with an 80-63 triumph vs. UCF en route to becoming the Gators' all-time winningest coach. . . . Scott Drew made his Baylor debut in 2003 with a 72-59 success vs. Texas Southern en route to becoming the Bears' all-time winningest coach. . . . Western Carolina's Kevin Martin (46 points vs. Coastal Carolina in 2002) and Stony Brook's Anthony Jackson (36 at Toledo in 2013) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Bruce Weber made his Illinois coaching debut in 2003 with a 94-66 victory vs. Western Illinois before becoming national COY in 2005 when guiding the Illini to the NCAA Tournament championship game.
23 - Kevin Stallings made his Vanderbilt debut in 1999 with a 72-55 triumph over Belmont en route to becoming the Commodores' all-time winningest coach.
24 - Gene Bartow made his UAB debut in 1978 with a 64-55 defeat against Nebraska before becoming the Blazers' all-time winningest coach. . . . Steve Fisher made his San Diego State debut in 1999 with a 73-57 victory vs. UC Riverside en route to becoming the Aztecs' all-time winningest coach and national COY in 2011. . . . Nolan Richardson made his Arkansas debut in 1985 with an 86-72 triumph over Southern Illinois en route to becoming the Razorbacks' all-time winningest coach.
25 - Bethune-Cookman's Reggie Cunningham (46 points at Stetson in 1995) and Nevada's Kevin Franklin (48 at Loyola Marymount in 1989) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Louisiana Tech's school-record 39-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Stephen F. Austin (67-58) in 1985. . . . Steve Alford made his Southwest Missouri State coaching debut in 1995 with an 83-71 win vs. Texas-Pan American en route to guiding four different DI schools to the NCAA playoffs. . . . Lute Olson made his Arizona debut in 1983 with a 72-65 triumph over Northern Arizona en route to becoming the Wildcats' all-time winningest coach. . . . Bob Huggins made his Cincinnati debut in 1989 with a 66-64 triumph over Minnesota en route to becoming the Bearcats' all-time winningest coach. . . . Gale Catlett made his West Virginia debut in 1978 with an 86-66 triumph over Rider en route to becoming the Mountaineers' all-time winningest coach. . . . Bob McKillop made his Davidson debut in 1989 with an 84-65 setback at Wake Forest before becoming the Wildcats' all-time winningest coach and earning national COY acclaim in 2008. . . . Roy Williams made his Kansas coaching debut in 1988 with a 94-81 success at Alaska-Anchorage before becoming national COY on four occasions.
26 - Dana Altman made his Creighton debut in 1994 with a 68-61 win at Oral Roberts en route to becoming the Bluejays' all-time winningest coach. . . . Dave Bliss made his New Mexico debut in 1988 with a 96-71 success vs. Loyola (Md.) en route to becoming the Lobos' all-time winningest coach. . . . Jim Boeheim made his Syracuse debut in 1976 with a 75-48 triumph over Harvard en route to setting the NCAA career record for most victories by a coach at a single school. . . . Larry Brown made his Kansas coaching debut in 1983 with a 91-76 reversal at Houston before guiding the Jayhawks to the 1988 NCAA title when he was named national COY. . . . John Calipari made his Massachusetts coaching debut in 1988 with an 84-61 success vs. Southern Connecticut before directing the Minutemen and two more schools to the Final Four. . . . Rudy Macklin (32 rebounds vs. Tulane in 1976) set Louisiana State's single-game rebounding record. . . . Kelvin Sampson made his Oklahoma coaching debut in 1994 with an 85-74 victory vs. Coppin State before becoming a two-time national COY with the Sooners. . . . . Bill Self made his ORU debut in 1993 with a 78-66 win vs. Sam Houston State before becoming the only coach in NCAA history to reach a Division I Tournament regional final in back-to-back years with different schools. . . . Tubby Smith made his Tulsa debut in 1991 with a 94-81 setback at TCU before becoming the only coach to take three consecutive teams seeded sixth or worse to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA playoffs and earn national COY acclaim with Kentucky in 2003.
27 - Brandon Wood (39 points at Georgia Southern in 2009) set Valparaiso's single-game scoring record against a Division I opponent. . . . P.J. Carlesimo made his Seton Hall coaching debut in 1982 with an 87-63 victory vs. St. Anselm (N.H.) before directing the Pirates to an NCAA Tournament runner-up finish in 1989 when he was named national COY. . . . Lon Kruger made his Texas-Pan American debut in 1982 with a 66-58 setback vs. Louisiana Tech before becoming the first coach to direct three different schools to the Top 20 of a final wire-service poll. . . . John Thompson Jr. made his Georgetown debut in 1972 with a 61-60 triumph over St. Francis (Pa.) en route to a school-record 596 victories with the Hoyas. . . . Alvan Adams (28 rebounds vs. Indiana State in 1972) set Oklahoma's single-game rebounding record.
28 - Tom Davis made his Iowa debut in 1986 with a 91-81 success at Alaska-Anchorage en route to becoming the Hawkeyes' all-time winningest coach. . . . Lou Henson made his Illinois debut in 1975 with a 60-58 triumph at Nebraska en route to becoming the Illini's all-time winningest coach. . . . Mike Krzyzewski made his Army head coaching debut in 1975 with a 56-29 victory over Lehigh before becoming the all-time winningest coach in NCAA history with Duke. . . . Mike Montgomery made his Stanford debut in 1986 with a 67-65 defeat against Georgia Tech at Richmond before becoming the Cardinal's all-time winningest coach.
29 - The three-point goal was an experimental rule in the Southern Conference in 1980 when Western Carolina's Ronnie Carr made the first three-pointer in history at Reid Gymnasium vs. Middle Tennessee State. . . . Alan Williams (39 points vs. South Dakota State in 2013) tied UC Santa Barbara's single-game scoring record. . . . Mike Krzyzewski made his Duke debut in 1980 with a 67-49 triumph over Stetson en route to becoming the Blue Devils' all-time winningest coach. . . . Jim Calhoun made his Connecticut debut in 1986 with a 58-54 triumph over Massachusetts en route to becoming the Huskies' all-time winningest coach. . . . Cliff Ellis made his South Alabama debut with an 82-68 defeat vs. Centenary before becoming the only coach in the 20th Century to hold three school single-season records with at least 25 victories at the same time. . . . Billy Tubbs made his Lamar head coaching debut in 1976 with an 80-73 triumph over Houston Baptist en route to more than 600 victories with three schools. . . . Gene Keady made his Purdue debut in 1980 with a 72-59 triumph over Colorado State en route to becoming the Boilermakers' all-time winningest coach.
30 - Dartmouth set an NCAA single-game record by having nine different players contribute at least one three-point basket vs. Boston College in 1993. . . . John Chaney made his Temple debut in 1982 with a 68-67 triumph at George Washington en route to becoming the Owls' all-time winningest coach. . . . Bobby Cremins made his Georgia Tech debut in 1981 with an 82-66 triumph against Presbyterian (S.C.) en route to becoming the Yellow Jackets' all-time winningest coach.

Bad Boys and Ball Boys: Fireman Boeheim Deals With Orange-Hot Flames

On the hardwood, Syracuse has been white hot for much of coach Jim Boeheim's four-decade stint. But the Orange may be joining North Carolina in ACC academic disarray. To the cage cynic, that might translate into additional NCAA probation for non-power conference schools such as Centenary, Cleveland State, Long Beach State, Louisiana-Lafayette, Louisiana Tech, Western Kentucky and Wichita State.

Off the court, Boeheim occasionally is fire chief extraordinaire, putting out fire after fire including calling an NCAA proposal "completely nuts" requiring teams to be on track to graduating half their players, the dismissal of assistant coach Bernie Fine amid predator allegations and Yahoo Sports publishing a story claiming SU didn't follow its drug-testing policies in allowing 10 players in the previous decade to continue playing after positive results. Right as one might think Boeheim deserved fire retardant, the program was embroiled in an NCAA probe.

Boeheim seems beleaguered when he doesn't defuse scrutiny by making it appear beneath his dignity to address any significant issue. The surly mentor sounds as if he needs a generous dose of truth serum when discussing his program's academic anemia. Any relevant candor appears odd such as Boeheim being "impressed" about one-and-done Carmelo Anthony's 1.8 gpa before failing to mention if Anthony attended more classes than games his second semester.

The tales of tumult escalate when Boeheim fails to control his tongue, let alone disdainful facial expressions. Apology notwithstanding, his incendiary money-motivated defense of the alleged 'Cuse Abuse certainly wasn't "fine" when considering the "high" number of suspect students he recruited.

Syracuse, where Child and Family Studies is emphasized, was one of 13 schools in the 2012 NCAA playoffs that would not have participated in the tournament if a new APR (Academic Progress Rate) was in effect that year. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, who averaged a team-high 16.9 points per game for Harvard in 1986-87, didn't mention Boeheim by name but seemed to take a backhanded slap at him when discussing graduation rates.

"When athletic programs have their priorities in order," Duncan was quoted in USA Today, "there are simply no better ways to teach invaluable life lessons than on the playing field or on the court. I just never understood why a small number of universities and colleges allowed rogue programs and coaches to taint that tremendous record of achievement and success."

SU had a longstanding reputation for giving the most clang for your buck when it came to success at the foul line. A need for eye exams and other physical testing may explain the previous faulty free-throw marksmanship if players indeed were immersed in alleged off-the-court shenanigans.

Fine was not charged with a crime and refuted the allegations lodged against him. But is accuser Bobby Davis, a former ball boy who unsuccessfully tried to sue Boeheim and the university for defamation (although case still simmers after reinstatement by New York's highest court), lying about him being noticed in Fine's road hotel room or is additional backtracking in the offing for Boeheim? In a worst-case scenario, could he be equally oblivious to the problematical academic progress and drug testing?

Post-college career or not, it isn't worth recounting the off-the-court distractions encountered by a disconcerting number of "Boeheim Bad Boys" who were All-Big East selections. There doesn't appear to be a smoking gun glowing over some of the garbage. But where there's smoke, there's a high likelihood of orange-tinged fire. By any measure, the unseemly incidents and scholastic neglect covering an extended period leave an unsavory culture-of-corruption stench.

Hunt for Mr. October: Best World Series Players Who Were College Hoopers

If it was easy, then everyone could do it. After playing college hoops for current Division I universities, MLB All-Stars Joe Adcock (LSU/.250 with no extra-base hits), Mickey Cochrane (Boston University/.245), Dick Groat (Duke/.204), Davey Johnson (Texas A&M/.192 and homerless), Kenny Lofton (Arizona/.250), Wally Moon (Texas A&M/.240 with only one extra-base hit), Graig Nettles (San Diego State/.225 and homerless), Jackie Robinson (UCLA/.234) and Dave Winfield (Minnesota/.136 and homerless) struggled at the plate in World Series competition significantly more than they did during the regular season.

On the other hand, which such versatile athletes thrived in the Fall Classic? The premier pitcher and player overall in this category probably is Bob Gibson (Creighton) while the most regal regular may come from among outfielders Earle Combs (Eastern Kentucky), Tony Gwynn (San Diego State) and Riggs Stephenson (Alabama). Following is an All-Mr. October Team featuring former varsity basketball players who attended schools that are or were major colleges before excelling in the World Series:

Position Ex-College Hoopster DI School World Series Summary
LHP Marius Russo Long Island Permitted only one earned run in winning both of his Fall Classic complete games with Yankees - 1941 (vs. Dodgers) and 1943 (Cardinals).
RHP Bob Gibson Creighton Compiled 7-2 record and 1.89 ERA with 92 strikeouts in 81 innings with Cardinals in 1964 (Yankees), 1967 (Red Sox) and 1968 (Tigers).
Reliever Ron Reed Notre Dame Allowed one run in 5 1/3 innings in five relief appearances with Phillies in 1980 (Royals) and 1983 (Orioles).
C Tom Haller Illinois Hit .286 (4-for-14 including one homer off Hall of Fame P Whitey Ford) with Giants in 1962 (Yankees).
1B Hank Greenberg NYU Hit .318 (27-for-85) with 14 extra-base hits and 22 RBI with Tigers in 1934 (Cardinals), 1935 (Cubs), 1940 (Reds) and 1945 (Cubs).
2B Charles "Buddy" Myer Mississippi State Hit .286 (8-for-28) in eight games with Senators in 1925 (Pirates) and 1933 (Giants).
3B Billy Werber Duke Hit .326 (14-for-43) in games with Reds in 1939 (Yankees) and 1940 (Tigers).
SS Alvin Dark LSU/USL Hit .323 (21-for-65) in 16 games for Braves (.167) and Giants (.415) in 1948 (Indians), 1951 (Yankees) and 1954 (Indians).
LF Riggs Stephenson Alabama Hit .378 (14-for-37) in nine games with Cubs in 1929 (Athletics) and 1932 (Yankees).
CF Earle Combs Eastern Kentucky Hit .350 (21-for-60) in 16 games with Yankees in 1926 (Cardinals), 1927 (Pirates), 1928 (Cardinals) and 1932 (Cubs).
RF Tony Gwynn San Diego State Hit .371 (13-for-35) with Padres in 1984 (Tigers) and 1998 (Yankees).
Most Underrated Charlie Keller Maryland OF hit .306 (22-of-72 with 10 extra-base hits) in 19 games with Yankees in 1939 (Reds), 1941 (Dodgers), 1942 (Cardinals) and 1943 (Cardinals).
Manager Walter Alston Miami (Ohio) Seven N.L. pennants with Dodgers resulted in four World Series championships (1955-59-63-65).

Julius Thomas Already Cracks Top Ten Among Ex-College Hoopster Tight Ends

If you need more unassailable evidence proving who are the best team-sport athletes in the world, check out Julius Thomas on the list of premier tight ends in the NFL. A striking number of the elite players at that rigorous position are former college basketball players although ESPN (Engineering Social Priorities Network) probably is more interested in positioning Michael Sam for another destination after he was "kissed" adrift from the Dallas Cowboys' practice squad. In the past, what kind of "picks" do you think imposing Mike Ditka (Pittsburgh) and John Mackey (Syracuse) set back in the day before the Big East Conference was formed? Wouldn't you love to see LeBron James maneuver down the field like Charles Atlas the same way he does when driving down the lane?

Although ex-California hoopster Tony Gonzalez failed to reach the 2013 postseason with the Atlanta Falcons in his quest to finally win a playoff game, succeeding in the NFL remains a "Battle of the Titans" at the TE position. Former hoopsters Antonio Gates (Kent State) and Jimmy Graham (Miami, Fla.) spark the San Diego Chargers and New Orleans Saints, respectively. Coming on strong at the same position is fellow ex-college hoopster Thomas, a relatively obscure player for the Denver Broncos until exploding on the scene last season as their runner-up in touchdowns with 12 and contributing a team-high eight pass receptions in an AFC title-game victory against the New England Patriots.

Thomas, an All-Big Sky Conference hoopster with Portland State, flashed potential as the next game-changing tight end when he caught nine touchdown passes in the Broncos' first five games this season. A 74-yard TD strike to "It's So Easy" at San Diego in mid-season last year illustrated that QB Peyton Manning intends to capitalize on Thomas' athleticism the same way he did ex-hoopster Marcus Pollard (Bradley) with the Indianapolis Colts. Pollard, a J.C. transfer who was the Braves' leading rebounder in 1992-93, caught at least three touchdown passes each of Manning's first seven NFL seasons from 1998 through 2004.

Ditka has a quality successor as an ex-hoopster tight end with the Bears in Martellus Bennett (Texas A&M). Thomas, Bennett and Jordan Cameron of the Cleveland Browns should keep moving up the following list of Top 25 NFL tight ends who were former college basketball players:

Rank Former College Hoopster Alma Mater Summary of NFL Tight End Career
1. Tony Gonzalez California First tight end in NFL history with 100 touchdowns completed his 17-year career in 2013 with 1,325 receptions for 15,127 yards and 111 TDs. He was 13-time Pro Bowl selection.
2. Antonio Gates Kent State Set an NFL single-season record with 13 TD receptions in 2004 en route to becoming San Diego Chargers' all-time leader for TD catches, receptions and receiving yards.
3. Mike Ditka Pittsburgh Five-time Pro Bowl selection caught 427 passes for 5,812 yards and 43 TDs in 12 seasons.
4. John Mackey Syracuse Hall of Famer caught 331 passes for 5,236 yards and 38 TDs in 10 seasons.
5. Jimmy Graham Miami (Fla.) Led New Orleans Saints in pass receptions in 2012 and 2013. Twice has had streaks of at least four games with more than 100 yards in pass receptions. After only four years, he ranked second all-time among New Orleans Saints' tight ends in receiving.
6. Todd Heap Arizona State Caught 467 passes for 5,492 yards and 41 TDs with the Baltimore Ravens from 2001 through 2010, leading them in receptions in 2002 with 68.
7. Ben Coates Livingstone (N.C.) Established NFL single-season record for most receptions by a TE with 96 in 1994.
8. Marcus Pollard Bradley Finished his 13-year career with 349 receptions for 4,280 yards and 40 TDs (long of 86 yards in 2001 midway through stint as starter for the Indianapolis Colts).
9. Pete Metzelaars Wabash (Ind.) Played in more games at TE than any player in NFL history when he retired. Led the Buffalo Bills with 68 receptions in 1993.
10. Julius Thomas Portland State Began 2014 campaign with a bang by catching three first-half TD passes in season opener from Peyton Manning en route to nine TDs in first five games for the Denver Broncos. Thomas was team runner-up with 12 TD receptions the previous year.
11. Joe Senser West Chester State (Pa.) Caught 165 passes for 1,822 yards and 16 TDs in four-year career with the Minnesota Vikings in early 1980s.
12. Andrew Glover Grambling State Caught at least one TD pass each of his 10 pro seasons from 1991 through 2000, finishing with 208 receptions for 2,478 yards and 24 TDs.
13. Rich McGeorge Elon (N.C.) Caught 175 passes for 2,370 yards and 13 TDs with the Green Bay Packers in nine years from 1970 through 1978.
14. Rickey Dudley Ohio State Scored 29 TDs in five seasons with the Oakland Raiders before hooking on with two other teams.
15. Derrick Ramsey Kentucky Caught 188 passes for 2,364 yards and 21 TDs with three different teams from 1978 to 1987.
16. Jordan Cameron BYU/Southern California Blossomed in third year with Cleveland Browns in 2013, catching 80 passes for 917 yards and seven TDs (three in game at Minnesota). He had three contests with at least nine receptions.
17. Reuben Gant Oklahoma State Caught 127 passes for 1,850 yards and 15 TDs with the Buffalo Bills in seven seasons from 1974 through 1980.
18. Bob Windsor Kentucky Caught 185 passes for 2,307 yards and 14 TDs with the San Francisco 49ers and New England Patriots in nine years from 1967 through 1975.
19. Keith McKeller Jacksonville State (Ala.) Caught 124 passes for 1,464 yards and 11 TDs with the Buffalo Bills in seven years from 1987 through 1993.
20. Martellus Bennett Texas A&M Caught 205 passes for 2,231 yards and 14 TDs with the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants and Chicago Bears in first six years from 2008 through 2013.
21. Greg Latta Morgan State (Md.) Caught 90 passes for 1,081 yards and seven TDs with the Chicago Bears in five years from 1975 through 1979.
22. Pat Richter Wisconsin Caught 99 passes for 1,315 yards and 14 TDs in nine seasons for the Washington Redskins after being their first-round pick in 1962.
23. Jeff King Virginia Tech Registered 93 receptions for 802 yards and seven TDs with the Carolina Panthers and Arizona Cardinals in first seven years from 2006 through 2012.
24. Ulysses Norris Georgia Best season of seven-year career was in 1983 when he had seven TDs with the Detroit Lions.
T25. Dee Mackey East Texas State Caught 94 passes for 1,352 yards and eight TDs in six NFL/AFL seasons from 1960 through 1965.
T25. Al Dixon Iowa State Caught 84 passes for 1,248 yards and eight TDs with four different teams from 1977 through 1984.

Mine Eyes Have Seen the Gory: Elite Schools Play Lame Non-League Slates

By any measure, it was shortsighted of Indiana and Kentucky to let their "Clash of the Titans" rivalry expire a couple of years ago because of colossal coaching egos. Regrettably, the schedule neglect doesn't end there although perhaps IU was clairvoyant and knew half of its roster would be sanctioned for assorted pinhead/pothead reasons. It's equally obscene fans aren't able to enjoy the following potentially great natural non-league matchups between in-state power league members: Cincinnati/Ohio State, DePaul/Illinois, Georgetown/Maryland and Penn State/Villanova and Notre Dame/Purdue.

Hiring of an apparent Bruce Pearl rerun notwithstanding, Memphis mentor Josh Pastner didn't discern the benefit in renewing the Tigers' series with Tennessee. He'd rather just sit at home afflicted with ED (Entertainment Dysfunction) and beat up on out-of-state fodder. Do you think there is any connection between such a misguided mindset and Pastner's pathetic record against opponents ranked in the Top 25? An exhibition-game loss against local Christian Brothers this season could be another indication why the Tigers look extensively beyond state borders to pad their record.

Shortsighted Maryland, rather than coping with an exit fee lawsuit from the ACC, should have faced litigation from Terrapin fans because of woeful non-league home schedule the last several years probably costing them at-large berths in the NCAA playoffs. The Terps' non-league slate upon joining the Big Ten remains "turrible." Shouldn't the overriding view be what's best for the fans, players and game in general? Instead, a striking number of schools should be criticized for their fiasco picking on an excessive number of patsies. Clemson can be criticized for losing at home against Winthrop but the Tigers shouldn't be flogged for meeting the Eagles. How many premium performances has the neglect caused fans to miss out on over the years such as Niagara's Calvin Murphy erupting for a school-record 68 points against Syracuse in 1968-69?

Two of the last three NCAA titlists - Kentucky and Louisville - oppose each other but should be embarrassed about their non-conference schedules leading up to their annual battle. Rather than insomnia-curing mismatches, how much more interest would there be in Wichita State opposing Kansas and Kansas State, Akron and Dayton against Cincinnati and Ohio State, Tulsa against Oklahoma and Oklahoma State, Illinois State against DePaul and Illinois, Missouri against Missouri State and Saint Louis, plus Belmont against Tennessee and Vanderbilt? KU may have one of the nation's most rigorous non-league slates for a Top 20 team but the Jayhawks should still have an entertaining duel with the Shockers on the heels of their recent respective Final Four appearances. At some point, Self-serving needs to defer to what's best for the sport. Mizzou's season-opening setback against UMKC probably shows why the Tigers avoid SLU and Missouri State.

Isn't this supposed to be the era for putting an end to bullying? The hoop haughtiness of power schools denying fans stimulating non-league games isn't a new phenomenon. For instance, LSU avoided potentially attractive in-state assignments for decades by never opposing McNeese State's Joe Dumars, Tulane's Jerald Honeycutt, New Orleans' Ervin Johnson, Louisiana Tech's Karl Malone, Northeast Louisiana's Calvin Natt, Centenary's Robert Parish and Southwestern Louisiana's Kevin Brooks, Bo Lamar and Andrew Toney. Similarly, North Carolina shunned Davidson first- and second-team All-Americans Stephen Curry, Mike Maloy and Dick Snyder during the regular season. The Tar Heels did defeat Davidson in exciting back-to-back East Regional finals by a total of six points in 1968 and 1969 when Maloy averaged 21.5 ppg and 13 rpg.

Don't we deserve to see national players of the year such as Indiana State's Larry Bird (never opposed Indiana), Princeton's Bill Bradley (Seton Hall), Navy's David Robinson (Georgetown and Maryland) and Bradley's Hersey Hawkins (Illinois) strut their stuff in regular-season contests against nearby prominent programs? The Terrapins only met "The Admiral" upon being forced to compete in the second round of 1985 Southeast Regional when Robinson contributed game-high figures in scoring, rebounding and blocks.

Elsewhere, the following mid-major All-Americans specifically and fans generally were shortchanged during the regular season by smug in-state schools since the accepted modern era of basketball commenced in the early 1950s: Texas Western's Jim Barnes (never played against SWC members except Texas in 1962-63 and 1963-64), Seattle's Elgin Baylor (Washington and Washington State in 1956-57 and 1957-58), Gonzaga's Frank Burgess (Washington from 1958-59 through 1960-61), Marshall's Leo Byrd (West Virginia from 1956-57 through 1958-59), Wichita State's Antoine Carr (Kansas and Kansas State from 1979-80 through 1982-83), East Tennessee State's Tom Chilton (Memphis State and Vanderbilt from 1958-59 through 1960-61), Dayton's Bill Chmielewski (Ohio State in 1961-62), Illinois State's Doug Collins (DePaul, Illinois and Northwestern in 1971-72 and 1972-73), San Francisco's Quintin Dailey (Stanford from 1979-80 through 1981-82), Bowling Green's Jim Darrow (Cincinnati and Ohio State from 1957-58 through 1959-60), Detroit's Dave DeBusschere (Michigan and Michigan State from 1959-60 through 1961-62), Detroit's Bill Ebben (Michigan from 1954-55 through 1956-57), St. Louis' Bob Ferry (Missouri from 1956-57 through 1958-59), Dayton's Henry Finkel (Ohio State from 1963-64 through 1965-66), Columbia's Chet Forte (St. John's from 1954-55 through 1956-57), Oral Roberts' Richie Fuqua (Oklahoma and Oklahoma State in 1971-72 and 1972-73), Loyola Marymount's Hank Gathers (USC and UCLA from 1987-88 through 1989-90), Jacksonville's Artis Gilmore (Florida in 1969-70 and 1970-71), Oklahoma City's Gary Gray (Oklahoma State from 1964-65 through 1966-67), Colorado State's Bill Green (Colorado from 1960-61 through 1962-63), Tennessee Tech's Jimmy Hagan (Tennessee and Vanderbilt from 1957-58 through 1959-60), Loyola of Chicago's Jerry Harkness (DePaul, Illinois and Northwestern from 1960-61 through 1962-63), Miami of Ohio's Ron Harper (Ohio State from 1982-83 through 1985-86), Western Kentucky's Clem Haskins (Kentucky and Louisville from 1964-65 through 1966-67), Detroit's Spencer Haywood (Michigan and Michigan State in 1968-69), Xavier's Tu Holloway (Ohio State from 2008-09 through 2011-12), Dayton's John Horan (Ohio State from 1951-52 through 1954-55), Army's Kevin Houston (St. John's and Syracuse from 1983-84 through 1986-87), East Tennessee State's Mister Jennings (Vanderbilt from 1987-88 through 1990-91), Memphis State's Larry Kenon (Tennessee and Vanderbilt in 1972-73), Loyola Marymount's Bo Kimble (USC and UCLA from 1987-88 through 1989-90), Bowling Green's Butch Komives (Cincinnati and Ohio State from 1961-62 through 1963-64), Oklahoma City's Bud Koper (Oklahoma and Oklahoma State from 1961-62 through 1963-64), St. Bonaventure's Bob Lanier (St. John's and Syracuse from 1967-68 through 1969-70), Xavier's Byron Larkin (Ohio State from 1984-85 through 1987-88), Texas-El Paso's David "Big Daddy" Lattin (SWC members except SMU in 1965-66 and 1966-67), Memphis State's Keith Lee (Tennessee and Vanderbilt from 1981-82 through 1984-85), Marshall's Russell Lee (West Virginia from 1969-70 through 1971-72), Wichita's Cleo Littleton (Kansas and Kansas State from 1951-52 through 1954-55), UC Irvine's Kevin Magee (USC and UCLA in 1980-81 and 1981-82), Western Kentucky's Tom Marshall (Kentucky from 1951-52 through 1953-54), Bradley's Bobby Joe Mason (DePaul, Illinois and Northwestern from 1956-57 through 1959-60), UNC Charlotte's Cedric "Cornbread" Maxwell (Duke and North Carolina from 1973-74 through 1976-77), Dayton's Don May (Ohio State from 1965-66 through 1967-68), Furman's Clyde Mayes (South Carolina from 1972-73 through 1974-75), Richmond's Bob McCurdy (Virginia in 1973-74 and 1974-75), Wichita State's Xavier McDaniel (Kansas State from 1981-82 through 1984-85), Western Kentucky's Jim McDaniels (Kentucky and Louisville from 1968-69 through 1970-71), Dayton's Don Meineke (Cincinnati and Ohio State from 1949-50 through 1951-52), Bradley's Gene Melchiorre (Illinois and Northwestern from 1947-48 through 1950-51), Southern Illinois' Joe C. Meriweather (DePaul, Illinois and Northwestern from 1972-73 through 1974-75), Seattle's Eddie Miles (Washington from 1960-61 through 1962-63), Drake's Red Murrell (Iowa from 1955-56 through 1957-58), Oklahoma City's Hub Reed (Oklahoma from 1955-56 through 1957-58) and Bowling Green's Nate Thurmond (Cincinnati and Ohio State from 1960-61 through 1962-63).

In a form of "gaming," a striking number of power league schools "man up" by appearing as if they want to celebrate Black History month in advance during their non-conference slates by overdosing on scheduling outmatched opponents from the MEAC and SWAC. Baylor is virtually an HBCU adjunct member this season with five home games against historically black colleges and universities.

Arkansas, Indiana, Memphis, North Carolina State, Notre Dame and Ohio State players, officials and coaching staff should don hoodies hiding their faces in shame during warmups for their non-league home slates. Why would anyone spend their hard-earned money on attending many of these blowouts? Even if an observer detests government involvement, perhaps state legislatures should step in where they can and force power league members to get off their high horse and play the following potentially entertaining intra-state games against quality mid-level opponents:

Power League Member Shunned Quality In-State Mid-Major Foes Out-of-State Non-League Weak Sisters on 2014-15 Home Schedule
Alabama South Alabama and UAB Appalachian State, North Florida, Stillman, Tennessee Tech, Towson and Western Carolina
Arizona State Grand Canyon and Northern Arizona Bethune-Cookman, Chicago State, Colgate, Lehigh and Pepperdine
Arkansas Arkansas State and UALR Alabama State, Delaware State, Iona, Milwaukee, North Texas, Northwestern State, Southeast Missouri State and Utah Valley
Auburn South Alabama and UAB Coastal Carolina, Middle Tennessee State, Milwaukee, North Alabama, Texas Southern and Winthrop
Baylor numerous non-HBCU schools in Texas Huston-Tillotson, McNeese State, Norfolk State, Prairie View, Southern (La.) and Texas Southern
California Saint Mary's, San Francisco, San Jose State and Santa Clara Alcorn State, Cal Poly, Cal State Bakersfield, Eastern Washington, Montana, Princeton and Wyoming
Cincinnati Cleveland State, Dayton and MAC schools East Carolina, Eastern Illinois, Morehead State, North Carolina Central, Saint Francis (Pa.), Stony Brook and Wagner
Georgetown American, George Mason and George Washington Radford, Robert Morris, St. Francis (N.Y.), Texas A&M-Corpus Christi and Towson
Illinois Bradley, Illinois State, Loyola of Chicago, Northern Illinois and Southern Illinois American, Austin Peay State, Brown, Coppin State, Georgia Southern, Hampton and Kennesaw State
Indiana Evansville, Indiana State and Valparaiso Eastern Washington, Grand Canyon, Lamar, Mississippi Valley State, New Orleans, UNC Greensboro, Savannah State and Texas Southern
Iowa Drake Alcorn State, Hampton, Missouri-Kansas City, North Dakota State, North Florida and Pepperdine
Kansas State Wichita State Bradley, Missouri-Kansas City, Nebraska-Omaha, Savannah State, Southern Utah and Texas Southern
Kentucky Morehead State, Murray State and Western Kentucky Boston University, Buffalo, Columbia, Grand Canyon, Middle Tennessee State and Texas-Arlington
Louisiana State Louisiana Tech, Louisiana-Lafayette and Tulane Charleston, Gardner-Webb, Sam Houston State, Savannah State and Southern Mississippi
Louisville Eastern Kentucky, Morehead State and Murray State Cal State Northridge, Cleveland State, Florida International, Jacksonville State, Marshall, UNC-Wilmington and Savannah State
Marquette Green Bay and Milwaukee Alabama A&M, Morgan State, Nebraska-Omaha, NJIT, North Dakota and Tennessee-Martin
Maryland American, George Mason, George Washington and Loyola (Md.) Central Connecticut State, Fordham, North Carolina Central, USC Upstate, Virginia Military, Wagner and Winthrop
Memphis Belmont, Chattanooga and Middle Tennessee Bradley, Jacksonville State, North Carolina Central, Oral Roberts, Prairie View A&M, USC Upstate, Stephen F. Austin and Western Illinois
Michigan State Detroit Arkansas-Pine Bluff, The Citadel, Loyola, Santa Clara and Texas Southern
Mississippi Southern Mississippi Austin Peay State, Charleston Southern, Coastal Carolina, Northern Arizona, Southeast Missouri State, Southern (La.) and Western Kentucky
Mississippi State Southern Mississippi Arkansas State, Clayton, Jacksonville, McNeese State, Mississippi Valley State, USC Upstate and Western Carolina
North Carolina State Appalachian State, Charlotte, Davidson, East Carolina and Western Carolina Boise State, Charleston Southern, Hofstra, Jackson State, Jacksonville, Louisiana Tech, Richmond and Wofford
Northwestern Bradley, Illinois State, Loyola of Chicago and Southern Illinois Central Michigan, Elon, Houston Baptist, Mississippi Valley State, North Florida, Northern Kentucky and Western Michigan
Notre Dame Ball State and Butler Binghamton, Chicago State, Coppin State, Fairleigh Dickinson, Grambling State, Hartford, Mount St. Mary's, Navy and Northern Illinois
Ohio State Akron, Cleveland State, Dayton and Xavier Campbell, Colgate, High Point, James Madison, Massachusetts-Lowell, Morehead State, North Carolina A&T and Sacred Heart
Oklahoma State Oral Roberts and Tulsa Middle Tennessee State, Milwaukee, North Texas, Northwestern Oklahoma State, Prairie View A&M and Southeastern Louisiana
Oregon Portland UC Irvine, UC Santa Barbara, Cal State Northridge, Concordia (Ore.), Coppin State, Delaware State and Detroit
Oregon State Portland State UC Santa Barbara, Corban, Grambling State, Mississippi Valley State, Oral Roberts and Rice
Pittsburgh Robert Morris Bryant, Florida Gulf Coast, Holy Cross, Manhattan, Niagara, Oakland, St. Bonaventure and Samford
Purdue Butler, Evansville, Indiana State and Valparaiso Arkansas State, Gardner-Webb, Grambling State, IPFW, IUPUI, North Florida and Samford
St. John's Iona, Manhattan and Stony Brook Fairleigh Dickinson, Franklin Pierce, Long Beach State, NJIT, Niagara, Saint Mary's and Tulane
UCLA Fresno State and Loyola Marymount UC Riverside, Cal State Fullerton, Coastal Carolina, Montana State, Nicholls State and San Diego
Utah Utah State and Utah Valley Alabama State, Ball State, UC Riverside, Carroll (Mont.), North Dakota, South Dakota State and Texas-Pan American
Wake Forest Appalachian State, Charlotte, Davidson, East Carolina and Western Carolina Bucknell, Delaware State, Iona, Mount St. Mary's, Nicholls State, Princeton and Samford
Washington Gonzaga Grambling State, Pacific, San Jose State, South Carolina State and Stony Brook

World Series-ous Athletes: Impact of Former College Hoopers on Fall Classic

Numerous universities have had versatile athletes who played college basketball before going on to major league baseball careers. While many single-minded basketball fans are assessing polls and rankings in preseason hoop magazines and websites, following is an incisive "Who Am I?" quiz for well-rounded basketball/baseball enthusiasts taking a toll on their memories as they try to recall World Series participants, including former members of the Kansas City Royals and San Francisco Giants, who played varsity basketball for a current NCAA Division I college.

Keep your chin up if you need relief answering the following questions because they're almost as difficult as both teams probably will find scoring off brilliant bullpens:

I was a 13-year major league second baseman who set several fielding records and played in the 1967 World Series with the Boston Red Sox after ranking among the nation's top 12 free-throw shooters both of my college basketball seasons with Oklahoma State.
Who am I? Jerry Adair

I was a 17-year first baseman who hit four homers and a double in a single game and played in back-to-back World Series with the Milwaukee Braves after being LSU's leading scorer (18.6 points per game) for the Tigers' 1945-46 team compiling an 18-3 record and losing against Kentucky in the Southeastern Conference Tournament final.
Who am I? Joe Adcock

I was a 10-year pitcher who led the A.L. in winning percentage in 1935 with an 18-7 record (.720) for the World Series-bound Detroit Tigers after I was named to the first five on an all-conference basketball team in my final season at Kansas State. I was a submariner who hurled a complete game victory in a 10-4 verdict over the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 4 of the '34 Series before losing Game 7 to Dizzy Dean.
Who am I? Eldon Auker

I was a shortstop who participated in five World Series, four with the champion, in a six-year span from 1910 through 1915 after earning a basketball letter for Holy Cross in 1908.
Who am I? John "Jack" Barry

I was a rookie pitcher in 1978 with the New York Yankees who went the distance for the first time in my major league career in a Game 5 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers in the World Series. I was a 6-5 forward who averaged 14.3 points and a team-high 8.9 rebounds per game for Dartmouth in 1974-75 when I was selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League.
Who am I? Jim Beattie

I was a catcher who appeared in back-to-back World Series with the New York Yankees (1927 and 1928) after being a basketball letterman for Niagara from 1916-17 through 1918-19.
Who am I? Bernard "Benny" Bengough

I was an outfielder who, during my 11-year career with the Pittsburgh Pirates, hit a double in the 1925 World Series to help them become the first team to come back from a 3-1 deficit in a seven-game series. I played with my brother on Oregon's basketball squad before we briefly played alongside each other with the Pirates.
Who am I? Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee

I was a player-manager who earned American League MVP honors in leading the Cleveland Indians to the 1948 World Series after being the top scorer for an Illinois team sharing a Big Ten Conference basketball title.
Who am I? Lou Boudreau

I was a pitcher who appeared in the 1947 and 1949 World Series with the Brooklyn Dodgers after notching 21-12 and 13-5 won-loss marks, respectively, following a basketball career at NYU, where I was the Violets' sixth-leading scorer in 1943-44 with an average of 3.8 points per game. Major league player and manager Bobby Valentine is my son-in-law.
Who am I? Ralph Branca

I was a 12-year outfielder who played in three World Series with the New York Yankees and hit 38 home runs in one season with Kansas City after finishing my college basketball career ranking fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list.
Who am I? Bob Cerv

I am a Hall of Fame catcher who participated in five World Series (1929-30-31-34-35) with the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers after playing basketball for Boston University.
Who am I? Mickey Cochrane

I posted a 1.88 ERA in 14 1/3 innings for the Boston Red Sox against the New York Giants in the 1912 World Series after being a two-year basketball letterman with Vermont.
Who am I? Ray Collins

I am a Hall of Fame outfielder for the New York Yankees who compiled a .350 batting average in four World Series (1926-27-28-32) after being captain with Eastern Kentucky's basketball squad.
Who am I? Earle Combs

I am a three-time All-Star Game performer who pitched in the 1957 World Series for the Milwaukee Braves after being an All-Pacific Coast Conference first-team selection in 1949-50 when the 6-7 sophomore center led Washington State and the PCC North Division in scoring (13.3 points per game).
Who am I? Gene Conley

I hit .323 in three World Series (1948 with Boston Braves; 1951 and 1954 with New York Giants). Member of LSU's 1942-43 basketball squad before entering military service (Marine Corps V-12 program) during World War II. Known as the "Swamp Fox," I was a five-sport letterman with Southwestern Louisiana Institute (now Louisiana-Lafayette) during 1943-44.
Who am I? Alvin Dark

I led N.L. outfielders in putouts three years and hit near or over .300 for three St. Louis Cardinal pennant winners (1926, 1928 and 1930) after earning letters three seasons in basketball for California.
Who am I? Taylor Douthit

I was a 10-year utility infielder who saw action in two World Series games in 1959 with the Chicago White Sox after averaging seven points per contest as a 5-9 starting guard for Indiana in 1951-52.
Who am I? Sammy Esposito

I was a catcher who appeared in two World Series with the Los Angeles Dodgers (1974 and 1978). Pacific teammate of All-American Keith Swagerty averaged 3.7 ppg and 2.3 rpg in 1965-66 and 1966-67 under coach Dick Edwards, scoring two points against eventual NCAA champion UCLA in the 1967 West Regional final.
Who am I? Joe Ferguson

I led the A.L. in won-loss percentage in 1946 with a 25-6 mark before pitching a shutout in Game 3 of the World Series for the Boston Red Sox against the St. Louis Cardinals after being a basketball letterman for Mississippi State in 1940-41.
Who am I? Boo Ferriss

I was a lefthanded hitting backup outfielder who participated in the 1929 World Series with the Philadelphia Athletics after being a basketball letterman for Army's 18-5 team in 1921 following two campaigns with Rutgers.
Who am I? Walter French

I wasa righthanded pitcher who appeared in the 1980 World Series with the Kansas City Royals after leading New Hampshire with 7.2 rebounds per game in 1975-76.
Who am I? Rich Gale

I was a first baseman-outfielder who hit 103 major league homers and pinch hit four times for the Cincinnati Reds in the 1961 World Series after earning a letter with Temple's basketball team in 1948-49 when I averaged 2.7 points per game.
Who am I? Dick Gernert

I was a lefthanded pitcher who appeared in the 1960 World Series with the Pittsburgh Pirates after finishing my four-year college career as Mississippi's leader in career scoring and rebounds following a senior season when my scoring average was higher than first-team All-Americans Elgin Baylor (Seattle) and Wilt Chamberlain (Kansas).
Who am I? Joe Gibbon

I am a Hall of Fame pitcher who set a record with 17 strikeouts against the Detroit Tigers in my third World Series in five years after becoming the first basketball player in Creighton history to average at least 20 points per game in a career.
Who am I? Bob Gibson

I am a palm-ball specialist who blanked the Baltimore Orioles in 5 1/3 innings in three relief appearances for the champion Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1971 World Series after becoming the first N.L. pitcher to appear in each contest of a four-game LCS. I connected on 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60.
Who am I? Dave Giusti

I am a Hall of Fame first baseman-left fielder who had 14 extra-base hits in four World Series with the Detroit Tigers after attending NYU briefly on a basketball scholarship in 1929.
Who am I? Hank Greenberg

I am an eight-time All-Star Game shortstop who started for World Series championship teams with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1960 and St. Louis Cardinals in 1964 after twice ranking among the top four scorers in the country with Duke.
Who am I? Dick Groat

I was a perennial All-Star outfielder with multiple Gold Gloves and N.L. batting titles who sparked the San Diego Padres to two World Series (1984 and 1998) after being a two-time All-WAC second-team selection as a San Diego State guard who led the league in assists as a sophomore and junior.
Who am I? Tony Gwynn

I was a three-time All-Star catcher who played in the 1962 World Series with the San Francisco Giants (swatted a two-run homer off Hall of Famer Whitey Ford of the Yankees in Game Four) after playing as a backup forward for Illinois' basketball squad as a sophomore (1956-57) and junior (1957-58).
Who am I? Tom Haller

I was a 12-year lefthanded reliever who appeared in back-to-back World Series with the New York Yankees after being a 6-7 Morehead State forward-center who ranked 15th in the country in scoring as a junior (24.2 ppg) and among the nation's top 10 rebounders as a senior (19.1 rpg).
Who am I? Steve Hamilton

I was a 12-year lefthanded pitcher who appeared in the 1989 World Series with the San Francisco Giants after being a 6-2 guard who averaged 5.3 points per game as a freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 ppg as a sophomore in 1977-78 for East Tennessee State.
Who am I? Atlee Hammaker

I was a first baseman-outfielder who participated in the 1942 World Series with the New York Yankees after playing for Manhattan basketball teams winning a school-record 17 consecutive games in 1930 and 1931.
Who am I? John "Buddy" Hassett

I was a lefthanded hitting utilityman who participated as a rookie with the New York Yankees in the 1923 World Series against the New York Giants after being a basketball letterman for Vanderbilt in 1918.
Who am I? Harvey Hendrick

I was a 10-year pitcher who hurled four shutout innings as the fourth-game starter for the New York Yankees in the 1939 World Series after being a basketball All-American for Butler. I was named to the first A.L. All-Star team in 1933.
Who am I? Oral Hildebrand

I was a 16-year first baseman/outfielder who homered in Game 4 of the 1963 World Series to help the Los Angeles Dodgers sweep the New York Yankees and twice led the A.L. in homers after leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding as a junior and senior.
Who am I? Frank Howard

I was a 13-year infielder who slugged 43 of my 136 career homers for the Atlanta Braves in 1973 after appearing in four World Series with the Baltimore Orioles (1966, 1969, 1970 and 1971). I averaged 1.7 points per game as a sophomore in my only varsity basketball season (1961-62) with Texas A&M before signing a pro baseball contract.
Who am I? Davey Johnson

I was a 13-year outfielder who hit .306 for the New York Yankees in 19 World Series games after being a three-year basketball letterman for Maryland.
Who am I? Charlie Keller

I was a Philadelphia Phillies relief pitcher who became N.L. MVP but lost the 1950 World Series opener to the New York Yankees as a starter, 1-0, after playing two seasons for Syracuse basketball teams.
Who am I? Jim Konstanty

I began rookie year with the Chicago Cubs by winning nine of my first 10 decisions before becoming a reliever for the 1969 Amazin' Mets World Series champion. I was a standout basketball player for Campbell in 1960 and 1961 when the North Carolina-based school was a junior college.
Who am I? Cal Koonce

I was an infielder-outfielder who hit .303 in my 15-year career. When I was with the Detroit Tigers, I led the A.L. in batting average once (.353 in 1959), hits four times (209 in 1953 when he was rookie of the year, 201 in 1954, 196 in 1956 and 198 in 1959) and doubles on three occasions (38 in 1955, 39 in 1958 and 42 in 1959) before appearing in the 1962 World Series with the San Francisco Giants. I managed the Milwaukee Brewers in the 1982 World Series. I played in five games for Wisconsin's basketball team in the 1951-52 season.
Who am I? Harvey Kuenn

I was a three-time All-Star outfielder who posted a .331 average with 22 HRs and 107 RBI in my first full season with the New York Giants in 1935 before appearing in the World Series in 1936 and 1937. I had two hits in a six-run second inning of Game Four in the Giants' lone victory against the New York Yankees in 1937 after scoring 16 points in nine basketball games for Arizona in 1931.
Who am I? Hank Lieber

I am an outfielder who led the A.L. in stolen bases, a record for an A.L. rookie, and appeared in the World Series with three different teams (Cleveland Indians, Atlanta Braves and San Francisco Giants) after setting Arizona basketball records for steals in a season and career.
Who am I? Kenny Lofton

I was a 12-year infielder who played in the 1957 and 1958 World Series with the New York Yankees after being a member of Southwest Missouri State squads that won 1952 and 1953 NAIA Tournament titles.
Who am I? Jerry Lumpe

I was a lefthanded outfielder who appeared in 1943 World Series for the New York Yankees against the St. Louis Cardinals after being a basketball letterman with William & Mary from 1935-36 through 1937-38.
Who am I? Arthur "Bud" Metheny

I was a Gold Glove left fielder in 1960 between participating in two World Series with the Dodgers (1959 and 1965) after averaging 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50.
Who am I? Wally Moon

I was a righthander who appeared in 1934 World Series with the St. Louis Cardinals' Gas House Gang against the Detroit Tigers. I was an all-around athlete for East Tennessee State.
Who am I? Jim Mooney

I was an infielder who hit .303 with the Washington Senators and Boston Red Sox in 17 A.L. seasons from 1925 through 1941, participating in two World Series (1925 and 1933). I was a basketball letterman for Mississippi State in 1923-24.
Who am I? Charles "Buddy" Myer

I was a five-time All-Star who holds the A.L. record for most homers by a third baseman (319), but was homerless in five World Series (four with the New York Yankees and one with the San Diego Padres). The highlight of my career was four dazzling stops in Game 3 of the 1978 World Series to help the Yankees win their first of four consecutive games. I averaged 5.3 points per game while earning basketball letters in my hometown for San Diego State in 1963-64 and 1964-65, shooting 87.8% from the free-throw line (36 of 41) as a sophomore.
Who am I? Graig Nettles

I was a 19-year pitcher who appeared in two World Series with the Philadelphia Phillies after averaging 18.9 points and 14.3 rebounds in three varsity basketball seasons with Notre Dame.
Who am I? Ron Reed

I was a catcher who played with the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1967 and 1968 World Series. I led Duquesne in scoring in my senior season with a 17.9 average in 1956-57 when I finished fourth in the nation in free-throw percentage (86.2). As a sophomore, I was a starter for an NIT championship team that compiled a 22-4 record and finished sixth in the final AP poll.
Who am I? Dave Ricketts

I appeared in 1915 World Series with the Philadelphia Phillies en route to becoming the N.L.'s winningest lefthanded pitcher until Warren Spahn broke my record. I earned basketball letters with Virginia in 1911-12 and 1913-14.
Who am I? Eppa Rixey Jr.

I am a Hall of Fame pitcher who was a 20-game winner for six consecutive seasons with the Philadelphia Phillies after leading Michigan State in field-goal percentage as a junior captain. In 1950, I lost my only World Series start, 2-1, when the Yankees' Joe DiMaggio homered off me in the 10th inning.
Who am I? Robin Roberts

I am a Hall of Fame infielder who was a regular for six National League pennant winners after compiling league-high scoring averages in both of my seasons with UCLA. I collected two homers and seven doubles in World Series competition for the Brooklyn Dodgers.
Who am I? Jackie Robinson

I was a four-time All-Star third baseman with the New York Yankees who appeared in six of the seven World Series from 1936 through 1942. I managed the Detroit Tigers after being a head basketball coach with Yale and with the Toronto Huskies of the Basketball Association of America. I played in a handful of basketball games for Dartmouth.
Who am I? Robert "Red" Rolfe

I was a New York Yankees lefthander who registered a pair of 2-1 World Series victories (over the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1941 and St. Louis Cardinals in 1943) after playing for two of the premier teams in college basketball history when LIU went 24-2 in 1934-35 and 26-0 in 1935-36. I was named to the first five on the Metropolitan New York Basketball Writers Association All-Star Team after the undefeated season.
Who am I? Marius Russo

I pitched in two World Series games for the New York Yankees in 1964 after being a 6-4 sophomore forward who averaged 13.5 points and 7.1 rebounds per game for Connecticut's NCAA Tournament team in 1959-60.
Who am I? Rollie Sheldon

I was a three-time All-Star first baseman-outfielder who played in the 1956 and 1958 World Series with the New York Yankees and 1967 World Series with the Boston Red Sox. I was a member of Southwest Missouri State squads that won back-to-back NAIA Tournament titles in 1952 and 1953.
Who am I? Norm Siebern

I was an infielder-outfielder who batted .319 or better in 12 of 14 major league seasons with the Cleveland Indians and Chicago Cubs from 1921 through 1934. In 1927, my first full season with the Cubs, I led the N.L. with 46 doubles. In the Cubs' 1929 pennant-winning season, I combined with Hall of Famers Kiki Cuyler and Hack Wilson to become the first outfield in N.L. history to have each starter finish with more than 100 RBI. I hit .378 in nine World Series games with the Cubs in 1929 and 1932 after being a guard who earned a basketball letter with the Alabama Crimson Tide in 1920.
Who am I? Riggs Stephenson

I was a 10-year switch-hitting utilityman who played in the 1970 World Series with the Cincinnati Reds. I was an all-conference selection both years when I finished third in scoring for Austin Peay State teams in 1959-60 (11.5 points per game) and 1960-61 (10.4 ppg) that participated in the NCAA Division II Tournament.
Who am I? Jimmy Stewart

I was a 13-year veteran who appeared in 485 major league games, all as a reliever, and won a 1979 World Series game with the Baltimore Orioles after being a starting forward opposite national player of the year David Thompson of North Carolina State for an NCAA basketball champion.
Who am I? Tim Stoddard

I was a lefthander who led the N.L. in won-loss percentage in 1973 (12-3 mark with the New York Mets) before appearing in the World Series and notching a save in Game 2 against the Oakland A's. Basketball letterman for Louisiana Tech in 1964-65 and 1965-66 (averaged 14.7 ppg as teammate of noted women's coach Leon Barmore).
Who am I? George Stone

I was a lefthanded swinging catcher-utilityman who participated in 1940 World Series with the Detroit Tigers after being a basketball letterman for Portland in the late 1920s.
Who am I? Billy Sullivan

I was an 11-year infielder who led the A.L. in stolen bases three times and hit .326 in the World Series for back-to-back N.L. pennant winners with the Cincinnati Reds after becoming the first Duke player to earn All-American honors in basketball. I was the initial player to bat in a televised major league game (Reds vs. Brooklyn on August 26, 1939) and the only player ever to hit four consecutive doubles in a game in both leagues.
Who am I? Billy Werber

I was an outfielder who played in 12 All-Star Games and had over 3,000 career hits after playing the entire game for Minnesota in the Gophers' first NCAA Tournament appearance in 1972. I participated in the World Series with the New York Yankees (1981) and Toronto Blue Jays (1992).
Who am I? Dave Winfield

Craig's Grist: POTUS' Coaching Failure Brother-in-Law Given ESPN Welfare

In politics, "elections have consequences" unless, of course, your side doesn't win as more foreign workers are legalized than jobs created. If you don't win in sports (occasionally at least 2/3 of the time), it eventually doesn't matter how consequential an elected-official might be; including the proverbial most powerful man in the world. You can just be like aging leftist leader Nanny Pathetic, who stretches the pass-it-now-read-it-later truth even more than her "Petty Woman" West face, and lie to "stupid" public about not knowing ObummerCare con-artist insult-ant Jonathan Gruber.

At first glance, a new TV commentator hiring resembles Chelsea Clinton charity when she was given a journalistic role at a major network. Let's just hope Barry-brother-in-law Craig Robinson is a better ESPN analyst than he was coach in a power league after the network contributed to record-setting levels of welfare under pen-and-phone President Barack Obama. Devoid of any media credentials, Chelsea received a political favor via an annual salary of $600,000 when she joined NBC News as a "special correspondent" (in excess of $25,000 for each minute displaying her hard-working brilliance on-air to make certain she wasn't dead-broke after leaving the White House and academic pursuits before making Shrillary Rotten a grandma). It isn't brain surgery, but the Dimocrap Dominatrix wearing the pants suits in her family doesn't believe jobs are created by businesses, so they must be given; not earned.

Robinson, beseeching the country for seven-footers regarding his Pacific-12 Conference welfare, was part of the Democratic Convention in Charlotte two years ago helping introduce sister Michelle Obama. Amid questioning whether about "2/3" of the party was shamed into putting God back into its platform, a "Fluke" inquiry lingered wondering if Robinson got a vacation from significant media criticism because he is brother-in-law of paternalistic POTUS pondering contrived definitions of "workplace violence" and marriage while turning the U.S. into a welfare nation, appointing a political operative with zero medical/health care expertise as Ebola Czar, penning secret "dove" letters to Iran's Ayatollah and serving unilaterally as lame-duck Extra-Constitutional bell hop for millions of illegal aliens.

The wily White House, adverse to an alleged discriminatory travel ban involving West Africa, wants U.S. military to combat Ebola in that region of the world on only four hours of training. But didn't demented Dems with perhaps 2/3 of a brain such as Ron Klain exhibit some sort of bias disease traveling to Florida to work hard for four weeks to ban overseas military ballots in 2000 recount standoff?

Taking Beaver Nation in the wrong direction, the sick circumstances at Oregon State didn't change last season and Robinson lost his job after failing to secure a presidential pardon as the Drone Ranger was bogged down religiously reading 2/3 of his intelligence briefings and prepping 2/3 of NCAA playoff brackets for ESPN. The Beavers bombed in their season opener against visiting Coppin State, the second HBCU to win in Corvallis in four years, and things didn't improve much from there comparable to the Oval Office tracking terrorists (no national or family security). The golfer-in-chief with more than 200 rounds under his mom-jeans belt, fond of comparing himself to Abraham Lincoln but too busy to attend the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, unilaterally couldn't give Robinson a mulligan as he was apparently too busy assembling an excuse for not saying "under God" while reciting a portion of the famous speech for historian Ken Burns.

At least Oregon State is sufficiently God-fearing to know not to put Seattle back on its schedule after losing at home to the Reclassifying DI school, 99-48, in 2009-10. That regrettable result (matching the most-lopsided setback in OSU history) reminiscent of Reagan mauling Mondale has to qualify as the most embarrassing clunker by a power league member thus far this century. It was perhaps as appalling as Central Planning's health care rollout debacle - the signature legislation for the selfie-taking "Audacity of Hype" - or his Marvin Gaye routine "I (Only) Heard It Through the Grapevine" pleading of ignorance regarding a poison-pen and sell-phone series of scandals and shortcomings. After shaking down the health-care industry for money rather than closely monitor website development, his sniveling former HHS secretary said during Congressional testimony: "Don't do this to me!" Meanwhile, about "2/3" of the non-Medicad populace says: "Don't do this to us!"

Right-thinking Americans don't like Duncan-like liars, Progressive Jihad, the White House "health-care apology" or ISIS-containing ineptitude and DC can keep it, period! Let me be more-than-2/3-of-the-way clear about the ideology as defenseless as the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, ill-conceived as shaking hands with/bowing down to dictators and insidious as intimidating witnesses of the Libyan lynching! But chill out, if your identity is pilfered by a navigator felon/former ACORN staffer, no one will be more upset than Mr. Teleprompter's neighborhood. In order to show compassion and not run the race-baiting risk of offending a grandstanding progressive, it's time to give the Obowwow apologists and lame-stream media enablers a hug like you would your little puppy and then let them go back to supporting sucking on at least 2/3 of the government nanny's boob. After the mid-term elections, at least give delusional Dimocrats free instruction on how to do "2/3" of "the wave."

There is no need to give them the old deflection-and-distraction razzle dazzle by being Clintonesque and parcing "is is" words amid the chronic fabrication. Few in the establishment media acknowledged it until the bitter end, but even a sports intern could realize no evidence existed from an unimpeachable source that Robinson could end the Beavers' bump-in-the-road streak of 32 consecutive campaigns winless in the NCAA playoffs. At least Robinson exhibited more character than other members of his family circle by not chronically immersing himself in the Bush-league ploy of blaming his predecessor (Jay John) for six lackluster OSU years. He also didn't turn for consolation and consultation to tax cheat Al "Not So" Sharpton after a significant setback.

Robinson matches the postseason expertise of ESPN analysts Dan Dakich and Tim Welsh who never posted an NCAA Tournament win as a Division I bench boss. His credentials don't quite measure up to ESPN experts Fran Fraschilla, Dino Gaudio, Seth Greenberg and Dick Vitale - each of whom has a lone NCAA playoff triumph in a collective 45 years of DI head coaching.

Hoping cynical comments aren't monitored in an IRS targeting binder assembled by Oval Office lackey Valerie Jarrett, let's move to a place where Robinson's commentary doesn't follow in his sister's organic-garden footsteps (a/k/a "dancing with turnip") by lecturing college hoopsters on what at least 2/3 of them should eat for lunch. But the good news is, as long as Robinson maintains a pulse, there is absolutely no way he already isn't a more competent media member than the former First Daughter.

Sad State: Roy Ebron's Death Depicts Inferior Quality On and Off Hardwood

In the aftermath of former Southwestern Louisiana center Roy Ebron recently passing away in New Orleans area, hoop aficionados subsequently have endured a classic lack-of-proper-perspective example of the cult-of-personality outweighing amateurish hoops history. Inexcusably, more sports columnists and self-proclaimed basketball experts dwelt on a variety of mundane subjects - Steve Alford's one-year contract extension with UCLA, Butler coach takes leave of absence, Jim Calhoun working as analyst for ESPN, Kentucky televising NBA combine, Oregon players arrested for shoplifting, etc. - rather than even acknowledging the passing of half of one of the premier Mr. Inside/Mr. Outside combinations in NCAA annals. Explosive USL guard Dwight "Bo" Lamar scored 51 points in each of back-to-back road games in 1971-72 en route to becoming the only player in NCAA history to pace the nation in scoring at both the college and university divisions.

In the early 1970s, SI designated Ebron, ULL's all-time leading rebounder, as perhaps the nation's premier pivotman other than UCLA's Bill Walton. Ebron, a Norfolk, Va., product, averaged 21.2 ppg and 13.2 rpg for USL in 1971-72 and 1972-73 during a span when national POY Walton averaged 20.8 ppg and 16.2 rpg. But have SI, ESPN, CBS Sports, NBC Sports, USA Today, Yahoo or a wide range of other prominent content providers for college basketball websites offered any relevant analysis since Ebron's demise?

In a "shatterproof" achievement likely never to be duplicated, USL became the only school ever to finish in the Top 10 of the final Division I rankings in its inaugural season at that level. Lamar collected 35 points and a tourney-high 11 assists and Ebron chipped in with 33 points and 20 rebounds in a 112-101 triumph against Marshall in the opening round of the 1972 Midwest Regional as the Ragin' Cajuns tallied the most points in the history of the tourney for a school in its first playoff game.

Contemporary players and teams, resembling ill-equipped sportswriters and producers, simply aren't anywhere as competent as personnel on and off the court 40 years ago. For instance, USL and Jerry Tarkanian-coached Long Beach State of 1971-72 vintage likely would be the preseason top two clubs in the country this campaign. Lamar and fellow junior Ed Ratleff of LBSU became the only set of former high school teammates (hometown of Columbus, OH) to be named NCAA consensus first-team All-Americans together. USL's 90-83 early-season victory over visiting Long Beach might have been one of the best intersectional matchups few people know about or remember.

Much of the present mass media should be placed in mothballs (issued the "death penalty"), but it was USL needing a restraining order to enter the 1973 NCAA playoffs because the school was accused of 125 rules violations. In an era when in-state schools Centenary (All-American Robert Parish) and Louisiana Tech (Mike Green) also went on NCAA probation, Cajuns coach Beryl Shipley's response: "Was that all they could find?"

Many of the allegations resulting in placing USL's program on the sideline for two seasons involved Lamar and Ebron. One of the legendary accounts linked to Ebron had him "winning" a drawing for a new automobile at a Lafayette dealership the day after he arrived on campus. "I'll be honest," Shipley told award-winning Louisiana author John Ed Bradley. "I didn't care about any damn rule book. I just tried to do what was right for the boys, what I knew I had to do."

Granted, Ebron didn't live up to expectations as a professional. But has there ever been a more underappreciated duo in NCAA history than Ebron and Lamar? Ebron (6-9) is the tallest player ever to average more than 20 ppg in the same season a teammate led DI in scoring. For the record, following are the highest-scoring teammate of a player the campaign when they were the nation's most prolific point producer:

Season Nation's Leading Scorer DI School Teammate Averaging > 20 PPG
1989-90 Greg "Bo" Kimble (35.3 ppg) Loyola Marymount Eric "Hank" Gathers (29)
1952-53 Frank Selvy (29.5) Furman Nield Gordon (24.3)
1953-54 Frank Selvy (41.7) Furman Darrell Floyd (24.3)
1975-76 Marshall Rogers (36.8) Pan American Gilbert King (23.3)
1971-72 Dwight "Bo" Lamar (36.3) Southwestern Louisiana Roy Ebron (23)
1988-89 Eric "Hank" Gathers (32.7) Loyola Marymount Jeff Fryer (22.9)

On This Date: Ex-College Hoopsters Make Headlines in October MLB Games

Extra! Extra! Read all about memorable major league baseball achievements and moments involving former college basketball players! Baseball is portrayed as a thinking man's game but only four percent of active MLB players earned college diplomas. Nonetheless, numerous ex-college hoopsters had front-row seats to many of the most notable games, transactions and dates in MLB history.

The St. Louis Cardinals won the World Series 50 years ago with a roster featuring six former college basketball players - Roger Craig, Bob Gibson, Dick Groat, Bobby Humphreys, Ray Washburn and Bill White. The Cards defeated the New York Yankees, a club boasting three pitchers with college hoops connections - Al Downing, Steve Hamilton and Rollie Sheldon. Unless you habitually pore over the content at baseballlibrary.com, baseballreference.com and nationalpastime.com, following is an October calendar involving such versatile athletes:

OCTOBER
1 - California Angels P Mike Barlow (basketball player for Syracuse from 1967-68 through 1969-70) won his lone start in 1977, yielding only two hits in seven innings in a 4-1 decision over the Kansas City Royals. . . . P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) incurred the loss for the Brooklyn Dodgers when they dropped the first-ever N.L. playoff in 1946 at St. Louis, which got three hits from C Joe Garagiola. . . . 1B Herb Conyers (second-leading scorer for Central Missouri State in 1941-42 when earning All-MIAA first-team recognition) clobbered a homer during an eighth-inning, five-run rally to help propel the Cleveland Indians to a 7-5 win against the Detroit Tigers in 1950. . . . Cincinnati Reds P Walker Cress (LSU letterman from 1936-37 through 1938-39) hurled a complete game but lost his lone MLB decision (2-1 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1948). . . . Chicago White Sox P Charles "Slim" Embrey (Vanderbilt letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) appeared in his lone MLB game in 1923. . . . After having only 66 regular-season at-bats, Chicago White Sox backup 3B Sammy Esposito (averaged 7 ppg in 1951-52 as starting guard under Indiana coach Branch McCracken) batted twice in an 11-0 victory against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1959 World Series opener. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers C Joe Ferguson (member of Pacific's 1967 NCAA playoff team) collected six RBI in an 8-4 win against the San Francisco Giants in 1980. . . . San Francisco Giants P Bob Garibaldi (starting forward averaged 10.6 ppg and 5.6 rpg for Santa Clara in 1961-62) lost his lone MLB start (9-4 against the San Diego Padres in 1969). . . . In the first game ever broadcast live coast-to-coast, P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) notched a career-high 17th triumph for the New York Giants in the opener of 1951 N.L. playoff series against Branca and the Brooklyn Dodgers. Supporting Hearn with a homer was OF Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln PA 1 1/2 years in late 1930s). . . . Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) contributed three hits and three RBI in an 8-5 triumph against the New York Yankees in Game 4 of the 1955 World Series. . . . Cincinnati Reds RF Earle "Greasy" Neale (West Virginia Wesleyan College hoopster graduated in 1915) contributed three hits in a 9-1 success against the Chicago White Sox in the opener of the 1919 World Series. . . . In his third start in five days, P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers, 4-1, in 1950 as the Whiz Kids clinched the Philadelphia Phillies' first pennant in 35 years. Roberts became the first 20-game winner for the Phils since Grover Cleveland Alexander in 1917. . . . In 1970, New York Mets OF Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman team in mid-1960s) supplied the only two hits (both doubles) off Chicago Cubs standout Ferguson Jenkins. . . . St. Louis Cardinals closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) established a N.L. record for most saves in a single season in 1991. . . . In 1954, OF Ted Tappe (leading scorer in 1949 NJCAA Tournament was Washington State's third-leading scorer the next year in 1949-50) traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the Chicago Cubs in a deal involving P Jim Willis (Northwestern State letterman in late 1940s). . . . St. Louis Cardinals 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram OH in early 1950s) played the entire schedule in 1963.
2 - Chicago Cubs P Dale Alderson (All-Iowa Conference selection for Upper Iowa in 1938-39 and 1939-40) lost his lone MLB decision (2-0 against the Boston Braves in 1943). . . . Philadelphia Athletics P Stan Baumgartner (played for University of Chicago's Big Ten Conference champion in 1913-14) hurled a six-hit shutout against the New York Yankees in 1925, holding both Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig hitless. . . . P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) yielded the first pinch-hit homer in World Series history (by Yogi Berra of the New York Yankees in 1947) but the Brooklyn Dodgers still prevailed in Game 3, 9-8. Two days earlier, Branca lost Game 1 when he was knocked out in the fifth inning. . . . New York Yankees OF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) pounded a pinch homer off the Brooklyn Dodgers' winning rookie P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman team) in Game 5 of the 1955 World Series. . . . Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (played for Boston University in early 1920s) contributed both of his homers in 31 World Series games in the first two outings against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1930. . . . OF Earle Combs (three-year captain for Eastern Kentucky) clubbed a homer and scored four runs as the New York Yankees swept the 1932 World Series by crushing the Chicago Cubs, 13-6. It was the Bronx Bombers' 12th straight WS game win. . . . In 1964, Houston Colt .45s P Danny Coombs (Seton Hall's third-leading scorer and rebounder as sophomore in 1961-62) notched his first MLB victory, holding the Los Angeles Dodgers scoreless over five innings as a starter. . . . SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL in mid-1940s) extended his World Series competition hitting streak to 12 in a row with three safeties in Game 4 as the New York Giants finished their sweep of the Cleveland Indians in 1954. . . . OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) contributed four hits as the Cleveland Indians assure themselves of a tie for the 1948 A.L. title with an 8-0 triumph against the Detroit Tigers. . . . In 1950, Boston Red Sox 1B Walt Dropo (Connecticut's first player ever to average 20 points for a season with 21.7 in 1942-43) became the first player to surpass 100 with more RBI (144) than games played (136). . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Darrell Evans (member of Jerry Tarkanian-coached Pasadena City CA club winning 1967 state community college crown) hammered his MLB-leading 40th homer in 1985, becoming the first player to reach that plateau in each league (41 round-trippers for the Atlanta Braves in 1973). . . . In the opener of the 1968 World Series, St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) outdueled 30-game winner Denny McLain, 4-0, and established a WS record by fanning 17 Detroit Tigers. . . . Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) fired as manager of the New York Mets in 1983. . . . In 1966, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) concluded his final season with career bests of 27 victories and 1.73 ERA. The previous year, Koufax finished with a single-season MLB-mark 382 strikeouts after fanning 13 Milwaukee Braves batters. In the 1963 World Series opener, the first five batters he faced whiffed en route to 15 strikeouts in a 5-2 win against the New York Yankees. . . . OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) supplied a homer to help the Cleveland Indians edge the New York Yankees, 4-3, in Game 3 of their 1998 A.L. playoff series. . . . Bud Metheny (letterman for William & Mary from 1935-36 through 1937-38) belted a first-game homer against the St. Louis Browns to help power the New York Yankees to their 14th sweep of a doubleheader in 1943. . . . New York Yankees rookie P Zach Monroe (played briefly for Bradley in 1950-51) hurled one inning of relief in Game 2 against the Milwaukee Braves in the 1958 World Series. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers LF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in Pacific Coast Conference both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) registered a postseason career-high three hits in a 3-2 win against the New York Yankees in Game 3 of the 1953 World Series. . . . Chicago Cubs LF Riggs Stephenson (Alabama letterman in 1920) stroked four hits against the Cincinnati Reds in 1929. . . . C Wes Westrum (played for Bemidji State MN one season before serving in military during WWII) supplied two sacrifice flies for the New York Giants to help them defeat the Cleveland Indians, 7-4, in Game 4 and sweep the 1954 World Series.
3 - New York Yankees rookie P Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) won the opener of the 1978 ALCS against the Kansas City Royals, yielding only two hits in 5 1/3 innings. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) sustained his sixth setback of the 1951 season against the New York Giants when Bobby Thomson hit the "shot heard round the world" (three-run homer in bottom of the ninth inning) to decide the N.L. playoff. A single by SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) started the rally climaxed by Thomson's historic blast. . . . 1B George Crowe (four-year letterman from 1939-40 through 1942-43 for Indiana Central after becoming first high school player named the state's "Mr. Basketball") traded by the Cincinnati Reds to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1958. . . . Jim Fanning (played for Buena Vista IA in late 1940s) resigned as manager of the Montreal Expos in 1982. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Dick Hall (averaged 12.8 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51 with Swarthmore PA for three Southern Division champions in MASC) earned the win the 4 2/3 innings of one-hit relief against the Minnesota Twins in the opener of the 1970 ALCS. . . . Cleveland Indians LF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) collected two doubles, including a two-run safety in the eighth inning, in a 2-1 win against the Boston Red Sox in Game 4 to clinch the 1998 ALDS. . . . P Bill Krueger (led WCAC in free-throw percentage as a Portland freshman in 1975-76) traded by the Los Angeles Dodgers to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1988. . . . Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) smacked the first homer of the 1957 World Series (third inning of Game 2 against the New York Yankees). . . . In 1904, New York Giants P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) fanned 16 St. Louis Cardinals in a 3-1 triumph. . . . Washington Senators 2B Buddy Myer (Mississippi State letterman in 1923-24) committed three errors in the opener of the 1933 World Series against the New York Giants. . . . RF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College MD in mid-1930s) provided a two-run triple to fuel a four-run, first-inning outburst sparking the Chicago Cubs to a 9-0 win against the Detroit Tigers in the opener of the 1945 World Series. . . . Despite striking out seven consecutive New York Mets hitters, Montreal Expos P Steve Renko (averaged 9.9 ppg and 5.8 rpg as Kansas sophomore in 1963-64) had his record fall to 1-10 with a 5-2 defeat against Hall of Famer Tom Seaver in the opener of a 1972 doubleheader. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding AR in late 1930s) registered a complete-game victory against the New York Yankees in Game 3 of the 1952 World Series. . . . New York Yankees 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50) smashed a three-run, first-inning homer to ignite a 5-1 Game 6 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1955 World Series. . . . Chicago Cubs closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) secured a save against the San Diego Padres in Game 2 of the 1984 NLCS.
4 - Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first-five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) helped the Detroit Tigers capture their first World Series in 1935, starting Game 3 against the Chicago Cubs and allowing two earned runs in six innings in a contest Detroit won in extra frames. . . . In a one-game playoff for the 1948 A.L. pennant, Cleveland Indians player-manager Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) banged out four hits, including two homers, in an 8-3 win at Boston. He finished the year with only nine strikeouts, the lowest number by any regular since 1922. . . . Baltimore Orioles CF Al Bumbry (Virginia State's runner-up in scoring with 16.7 ppg as freshman in 1964-65) collected three hits, two runs and two stolen bases in a 9-8 win against the California Angels in Game 2 of the 1979 ALCS. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Bud Culloton (Fordham letterman from 1919 through 1921) started and yielded only one earned run in five innings but dropped his lone MLB decision (4-1 in nightcap of 1925 doubleheader). . . . New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) delivered a three-run homer against New York Yankees P Allie Reynolds in the opener of the 1951 World Series. Thirteen years later, Dark was dismissed as manager of the San Francisco Giants in 1964. . . . In 1930, St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924), who hit an anemic .140 in 13 career World Series contests, broke a scoreless tie in the fourth inning by smacking his lone postseason homer in a 5-0 victory against the Philadelphia Athletics in Game 3. . . . California Angels P Dave Frost (averaged 10.5 ppg and 4 rpg for Stanford from 1971-72 through 1973-74) lost his lone postseason start (against the Baltimore Orioles in Game 2 of the 1979 ALCS). . . . INF Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of his last three seasons with Lebanon Valley PA in late 1920s) selected by the Washington Senators from the St. Louis Browns in 1938 Rule 5 draft. . . . In the opener of the 1967 World Series, St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) fanned 10 Boston batters in a 2-1 triumph. Red Sox OF Norm Siebern (member of Southwest Missouri State squads capturing back-to-back NAIA Tournament titles in 1952 and 1953) led off the bottom of the eighth inning with a single off Gibson but his pinch-runner was left stranded. . . . Detroit Tigers OF Hank Greenberg (attended NYU briefly on hoop scholarship in 1929) whacked a homer in a 4-1 Game 2 victory against the Chicago Cubs in the 1945 World Series. . . . In the opening game of the 1951 World Series, LF Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln PA 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) stole home and collected four hits to spark the New York Giants to a 5-1 victory against the New York Yankees. . . . New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (Maryland three-year letterman from 1934-35 through 1936-37) launched his second homer of the 1942 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . P Jim Konstanty (Syracuse player in late 1930s), after making 133 straight relief appearances for the Philadelphia Phillies, started Game 1 of the 1950 World Series but lost against the New York Yankees, 1-0. . . . Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) swiped three bases against the Baltimore Orioles in Game 3 of the 1996 ALDS. Nine years later, Lofton collected three hits and four RBI against the New York Yankees in the 2007 ALDS opener. . . . Philadelphia Phillies OF Jerry Martin (1971 Southern Conference Tournament MVP after he was Furman's runner-up in scoring previous season) smacked a pinch homer against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the opener of the 1978 NLCS. . . . St. Francisco Giants P Roger Mason (multiple-year letterman in late 1970s for Saginaw Valley State MI) tossed his lone MLB shutout (four-hitter with 10 strikeouts against the Atlanta Braves in 1985). . . . Minnesota Twins 2B Dan Monzon (played briefly for Buena Vista IA in 1964-65) scored four runs against the Chicago White Sox in 1972. . . . In 1930, Chicago White Sox rookie OF Jimmy Moore (Union TN standout in late 1920s) stroked a pinch-hit single in his first World Series at-bat in Game 3 against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . OF Bill Nicholson (played for Washington College MD in mid-1930s) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the Philadelphia Phillies for former N.L. batting champion Harry Walker in 1948. . . . P Roy Parmelee (letterman for Eastern Michigan in 1924-25 and 1925-26) selected from the Boston Red Sox by the Philadelphia Athletics in 1938 Rule 5 draft. . . . P Cotton Pippen (Texas Western letterman in 1929-30) selected from the St. Louis Cardinals by the Philadelphia Athletics in 1938 Rule 5 draft. . . . Jim Riggleman (two-year letterman for Frostburg State MD averaged 7.2 ppg in early 1970s) fired as manager of the Chicago Cubs in 1999. . . . New York Yankees P Marius Russo (member of LIU teams compiling a 50-2 record in 1934-35 and 1935-36 under legendary coach Clair Bee) hurled a four-hitter in a 2-1 verdict over the Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 3 of the 1941 World Series. In the seventh inning of a scoreless tie, Russo broke P Fred Fitzsimmons' knee with a line drive. . . . New York Giants P Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence NY in early 1930s) tossed a five-hitter in a 6-1 victory in Game 2 of the 1933 World Series against the Washington Senators. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) yielded a run in final relief appearance of 1980 campaign after holding the opposition scoreless in previous 14-game span during the month when he recorded seven saves.
5 - P Ralph Branca (sixth-leading scorer for NYU in 1943-44) won Game 6 of the 1947 World Series for the Brooklyn Dodgers when he was helped by Al Gionfriddo's famous catch of New York Yankees Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio's long drive to left field. . . . Milwaukee Braves OF John DeMerit (Wisconsin letterman in 1956-57) served as a pinch-runner in Game 3 of the 1957 World Series. . . . New York Giants 3B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) went 4-for-4 against the New York Yankees in the opener of the 1921 World Series. . . . St. Louis Cardinals SS Charlie Gelbert (scored at least 125 points each of last three seasons in late 1920s with Lebanon Valley PA) hit safely in first four World Series games against the Philadelphia Athletics in 1930. . . . New York Giants INF Eddie Grant (paced Harvard's freshman squad in scoring in 1902 and played varsity as sophomore before declared ineligible for receiving money in independent summer baseball league) died from German shelling in 1918 in the Argonne Forest, France, during WWI while in charge of his battalion after his commanding officer was killed. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers P Mark Hendrickson (two-time All-Pacific-10 Conference selection was Washington State's leading rebounder each season from 1992-93 through 1995-96) allowed his only hit in three scoreless relief appearances against the New York Mets in the 2006 NLDS. . . . 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) went 3-for-3, including a two-run double putting the Brooklyn Dodgers ahead for good, in a 13-8 win against the New York Yankees in Game 2 of the 1956 World Series. Three years later in the 1959 WS, Hodges' homer in the bottom of the eighth inning gave the Dodgers a 5-4 triumph against the Chicago White Sox in Game 4. . . . New York Giants OF Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln PA 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) hit safely seven straight times in the 1951 World Series against the New York Yankees. . . . Baltimore Orioles 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg in 1961-62 with Texas A&M) homered in back-to-back 1970 ALCS games against the Minnesota Twins. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers RF "Sweet" Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52), blanked by Dave McNally and Moe Drabowsky of the Baltimore Orioles in the 1966 opener, went hitless for the only time in his last nine World Series contests. . . . DH David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) homered off Dwight Gooden to help the Cleveland Indians square their 1997 ALDS at two games apiece with the New York Yankees. . . . New York Yankees LF Charlie Keller (Maryland three-year letterman from 1934-35 through 1936-37) contributed four hits, including a go-ahead, two-run double in the ninth inning, in a 7-4 victory against the Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 4 of the 1941 World Series. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as All-Iowa Conference freshman selection in 1964-65 and 12.1 as sophomore in 1965-66) contributed a homer and triple while knocking in three runs in a 4-0 decision over the Philadelphia Phillies in Game 2 of 1978 NLCS. . . . OF Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games with Westminster MO in 1968-69 and 1969-70) accounted for the Philadelphia Phillies' lone run with a homer in a 7-1 setback against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 2 of the 1977 NLCS. . . . 2B Buddy Myer (Mississippi State letterman in 1923-24) had three hits, scored the Washington Senators' first run and drove in their last two runs in a 4-0 win against the New York Giants in Game 3 of the 1933 World Series. . . . Chicago Cubs P Claude Passeau (letterman with Millsaps MS in late 1920s and early 1930s) hurled a one-hit shutout against the Detroit Tigers in Game 3 of the 1945 World Series. . . . P Nels Potter (leading scorer during two years he attended Mount Morris IL in early 1930s) selected from the St. Louis Cardinals by the Philadelphia Athletics in 1937 Rule 5 draft. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) lost Game 2 of the 1950 World Series against the New York Yankees, 2-1, on Joe DiMaggio's leadoff homer in the 10th inning. . . . New York Giants P Hal Schumacher (played for St. Lawrence NY in early 1930s) notched the victory in Game 5 of the 1936 World Series against the New York Yankees. Schumacher lost Game 2 three days earlier. . . . Kansas City Royals P Paul Splittorff (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Morningside IA in 1967-68) yielded only one hit in combining with Rich Gale (led New Hampshire with 7.2 rpg in 1975-76) for a 4-0 triumph against the Minnesota Twins in 1980. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Ray Washburn (led Whitworth WA in scoring and named All-Evergreen Conference in 1958-59 and 1959-60) won Game 3 of the 1968 World Series against the Detroit Tigers. . . . In 1985, RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) became the first New York Yankee to collect 100 RBI and score 100 runs in a single season since Joe DiMaggio in 1942.
6 - Detroit Tigers P Elden Auker (All-Big Six Conference first-five selection with Kansas State in 1931-32) went the distance in whipping the St. Louis Cardinals, 10-4, in Game 4 of the 1934 World Series. . . . Philadelphia Phillies rookie P Stan Baumgartner (played for University of Chicago's Big Ten Conference champion in 1913-14) closed out the 1914 campaign with a seven-inning shutout against the New York Giants. . . . Philadelphia Athletics C Mickey Cochrane (played for Boston University in early 1920s) went 4-for-4 against the New York Yankees in 1929. . . . St. Louis Cardinals CF Taylor Douthit (California letterman from 1922 through 1924) collided with a teammate in Game 4 and was sidelined for the remainder of the 1926 World Series against the New York Yankees. . . . P George Earnshaw (Swarthmore PA player in 1922) square the 1931 World Series with a two-hit, 3-0 shutout for the Philadelphia Athletics against the St. Louis Cardinals. The previous year, Earnshaw combined Hall of Famer Lefty Grove for a three-hit shutout against the Cardinals in Game 5 of the 1930 World Series. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Hank Greenberg (attended NYU briefly on hoop scholarship in late 1920s) accumulated two doubles among his four hits in a 10-4 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 4 of 1934 World Series. Six years later, Greenberg's three-run homer opened the scoring in an 8-0 victory against the Cincinnati Reds in Game 5 of the 1940 WS. . . . 3B Wayne Gross (led Cal Poly Pomona in assists in 1974-75) whacked a three-run homer to power the Oakland Athletics to a 4-0 triumph against the Kansas City Royals in Game 1 of the 1981 ALDS. . . . Despite walking eight batters, New York Giants P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) won his only World Series start (6-2 against the New York Yankees in Game 3 in 1951). . . . P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) outdueled fellow lefthander Whitey Ford as the Los Angeles Dodgers swept the 1963 World Series from the New York Yankees. RF Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) contributed both of L.A.'s safeties off Ford, including a long homer in the fifth inning. . . . Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) fired as manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2000. . . . Milwaukee Braves SS Johnny Logan (played for Binghamton in 1948-49) doubled home the tying run in the bottom of the 10th inning and scored on Eddie Mathews' game-winning homer in a 7-5 decision over the New York Yankees in Game 4 of the 1957 World Series. Yankees 3B Jerry Lumpe (played in 1952 NAIA Tournament final for Southwest Missouri State's championship team) hit safely in third consecutive WS outing. . . . Chicago White Sox rookie P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) secured his first two of 260 MLB victories by winning both ends of a 1923 doubleheader in relief against the Cleveland Indians. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Jim Mooney (played for East Tennessee State) hurled one inning of scoreless relief in Game 4 against the Detroit Tigers in the 1934 World Series. . . . P Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) posted his 20th triumph of the 1980 season (7-1 against the Los Angeles Dodgers in one-game playoff) to propel the Houston Astros to postseason competition for the first time since the franchise started in 1962. . . . New York Yankees P Joe Ostrowski (led Scranton in scoring with 15.1 ppg in 1942-43) tossed two scoreless innings of relief in Game 3 of 1951 World Series against the New York Giants. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers OF Rip Repulski (part-time starter for St. Cloud State MN) received an intentional walk in Game 5 in his only at-bat in the 1959 World Series against the Chicago White Sox. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers P Preacher Roe (played for Harding AR in late 1930s) tossed a shutout against the New York Yankees in Game 2 of the 1949 World Series. The contest's only RBI was supplied by 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948), who drove in 2B Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons with UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41). . . . New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (played briefly with Dartmouth in 1927-28 and 1929-30) registered his fourth multiple-hit game in the 1936 World Series against the New York Giants. Rolfe hit .400 in six contests. . . . Closer Lee Smith (averaged 3.4 ppg and 1.9 rpg with Northwestern State in 1976-77) lost Game 4 with the Chicago Cubs in the 1984 NLCS and Game 2 with the Boston Red Sox in the 1988 ALCS. . . . Atlanta Braves P Cecil Upshaw (Centenary's leading scorer as junior in 1962-63) relieved in each of the first three games against the New York Mets in the 1969 NLCS. . . . Washington Senators P Monte Weaver (played center for Emory & Henry VA in mid-1920s) toiled 10 1/3 innings before losing Game 4, 2-1, against the New York Giants in the 1933 World Series.
7 - Joe Adcock (LSU's leading scorer in 1945-46) never had an extra-base hit in 28 World Series at-bats, but the Milwaukee Braves 1B drove in the only run of Game 5 in 1957 with a single off New York Yankees P Whitey Ford. . . . New York Giants 3B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) reached base five times with two hits and three walks against the New York Yankees in Game 3 of the 1921 World Series. . . . Detroit Tigers LF Hank Greenberg (enrolled at NYU on hoop scholarship in 1929 but attended college only one semester) collected three doubles in an 8-4 win against the Chicago Cubs in Game 5 of the 1945 World Series. . . . In 2001, Hall of Fame OF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) played final game of his 20-year career for the San Diego Padres. Seventeen years earlier, Gwynn's two-run double put the Padres ahead to stay in a 6-3 win against the Chicago Cubs in Game 5 of the 1984 NLCS. . . . In Game 7, Brooklyn Dodgers 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) went hitless again against the New York Yankees and finished 0-for-21 in the 1952 World Series. . . . 1B-OF Doug Howard (All-WAC second-team selection with Brigham Young in 1968-69 and 1969-70) shipped by the California Angels to the St. Louis Cardinals to complete an earlier deal in 1974. . . . New York Yankees OF Charlie Keller (three-year letterman with Maryland from 1934-35 through 1936-37) clobbered two homers in a 7-3 triumph at Cincinnati in Game 3 of the 1939 World Series. . . . Kansas City Royals DH Joe Lahoud (New Haven CT letterman in mid-1960s) scored two runs in a 6-2 victory against the New York Yankees in Game 3 of the 1977 ALCS. . . . Chicago White Sox 3B Vance Law (averaged 6.8 ppg for BYU from 1974-75 through 1976-77) knocked in his lone postseason run (against the Baltimore Orioles in Game 3 of the 1983 ALCS). . . . In the 1939 Windy City World Series, Chicago Cubs OF Hank Lieber (played for Arizona in 1931) hammered a game-winning, two-out, three-run homer in the ninth inning for a 5-3 verdict over the White Sox in Game 4. . . . Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) died of tuberculosis in 1925 at the age of 45. . . . Philadelphia Phillies OF Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games with Westminster MO in 1968-69 and 1969-70) sent Game 4 into extra innings with a pinch homer before they bowed to the Los Angeles Dodgers, 4-3, in the 1978 NLCS. . . . Cincinnati Reds RF Greasy Neale (graduated in 1915 from West Virginia Wesleyan) went 3-for-4 for the second time in the first six games of the 1919 World Series against the Chicago White Sox. . . . Houston Astros P Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) hurled eight shutout innings in a 1-0 triumph against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 2 of the 1981 NLDS. . . . Cincinnati Reds 3B Billy Werber (first Duke All-American in 1929-30) hit safely in first six games of 1940 World Series against the Detroit Tigers. . . . P Chris Young (All-Ivy League first-team selection for Princeton in 1999-00) notched the San Diego Padres' only victory in the 2006 NLCS (3-1 against the St. Louis Cardinals). . . . New York Yankees P Tom Zachary (Guilford NC letterman in 1916) hurled a complete-game, 7-3 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 3 of the 1928 World Series.
8 - New York Giants SS Alvin Dark (played for LSU and USL in mid-1940s) delivered three doubles against the New York Yankees in Game 4 of the 1951 World Series. . . . George Earnshaw (played for Swarthmore PA in 1922), clearly the pitching standout of the 1930 World Series, carried the Philadelphia Athletics to a decisive 7-1 triumph against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . P Eddie Fisher (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the California Angels in 1968. . . . New York Giants 3B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) supplied his fourth multiple-hit game in 1922 World Series to finish with a .471 batting average for champions in five outings against the New York Yankees. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) hurled a five-hit shutout against the Boston Red Sox in Game 4 of the 1967 World Series. . . . San Francisco Giants C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) supplied a go-ahead homer off Whitey Ford in the seventh inning against the New York Yankees in Game 4 of the 1962 World Series. . . . P Oral Hildebrand (All-American for Butler in 1928-29 and 1929-30) hurled four scoreless innings as the New York Yankees' starter in Game 4 of the 1939 World Series when they swept the Cincinnati Reds. . . . Boston Red Sox P Bruce Hurst (played J.C. for Dixie UT in mid-1970s) secured a 9-2 victory against the California Angels in Game 2 of the 1986 ALCS. . . . New York Yankees RF Charlie Keller (Maryland three-year letterman from 1934-35 through 1936-37) broke up a scoreless duel with a seventh-inning homer en route to a 7-4 success against the Cincinnati Reds in Game 4 of the 1939 World Series. . . . St. Louis Cardinals LF Danny Litwhiler (member of JV squad with Bloomsburg PA three years in mid-1930s) delivered a homer and double in a 2-0 win against the St. Louis Browns in Game 5 of the 1944 World Series. . . . Chicago Cubs CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) supplied four hits against the Florida Marlins in Game 2 of the 2003 NLCS. . . . In Game 2, P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) hurled a 10-inning shutout for the New York Giants' lone victory against the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1913 World Series. . . . LF Wally Moon (averaged 4.3 ppg with Texas A&M in 1948-49 and 1949-50) capped off a six-run, fourth-inning eruption with a two-run homer as the Los Angeles Dodgers clinched the 1959 World Series crown with a 9-3 triumph against the Chicago White Sox in Game 6. . . . P Roy Parmelee (letterman for Eastern Michigan in 1924-25 and 1925-26) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs in 1936. . . . New York Yankees 3B Red Rolfe (played briefly with Dartmouth in 1927-28 and 1929-30) provided a pair of doubles in a 5-1 win against the New York Giants in Game 3 of the 1937 World Series. . . . New York Yankees LF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) delivered a triple among his postseason career-high three hits in a 3-0 win against the Milwaukee Brewers in Game 2 of the 1981 ALDS.
9 - C Benny Bengough (Niagara letterman from 1916-17 through 1918-19) secured a hit for the third straight 1928 World Series game to help the New York Yankees sweep the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . Boston Red Sox P Ray Collins (Vermont letterman in 1907 and 1908) started Game 2 of the 1912 World Series against the New York Giants when they tied, 6-6, in a contest called after 11 innings. . . . Before a crowd of 81,897, OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) contributed the first homer of the 1948 World Series to spark the Cleveland Indians to a 2-1 victory against the Boston Braves in Game 4. . . . Boston Red Sox P Boo Ferriss (Mississippi State letterman in 1941) hurled a 4-0 shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 3 of the 1946 World Series. . . . New York Giants LF Monte Irvin (played for Lincoln PA 1 1/2 years in late 1930s) provided his fourth multiple-hit outing in first five World Series games in 1951 against the New York Yankees. . . . New York Giants CF Hank Leiber (played for Arizona in 1931) contributed two hits, two runs and two RBI in a 7-3 win against the New York Yankees in Game 4 of the 1937 World Series. . . . In the first World Series utilizing a seven-game format, New York Giants Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) blanked the Philadelphia Athletics, 3-0, in the opener of the all-shutout 1905 World Series. Mathewson also tossed whitewashes in Game 3 and Game 5. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates SS Paul Popovich (teammate of Jerry West for West Virginia's 1960 NCAA playoff team) hit safely in all three 1974 NLCS games against the Los Angeles Dodgers. . . . Despite yielding only one earned run in 9 2/3 innings in two starts against the St. Louis Cardinals, St. Louis Browns P Nels Potter (leading scorer in early 1930s for Mount Morris IL) lost his lone World Series decision (3-1 in Game 6 in 1944). . . . Pittsburgh Pirates 1B Gary Redus Sr. (J.C. player for Athens AL and father of Centenary/South Alabama performer) went 3-for-3, including two extra-base hits, and scored the decisive run in a 3-2 triumph against the Atlanta Braves in Game 3 of the 1992 NLCS. . . . St. Louis Cardinals C Dave Ricketts (three-year starter led Duquesne in scoring senior season with 17.9 ppg in 1956-57) registered his lone World Series hit with a pinch single off Detroit Tigers P Denny McLain in Game 6 in 1968. . . . St. Louis Cardinals RF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) hit safely in all three of 1931 World Series games he started against the Philadelphia Athletics. . . . CF Bill Virdon (played for Drury MO in 1949) stroked a two-run single propelling the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 3-2 triumph against the New York Yankees in Game 4 of the 1960 World Series. . . . Washington Senators P Tom Zachary (Guilford NC letterman in 1916) hurled a complete-game, 2-1 win against the New York Giants in Game 6 of the 1924 World Series. Zachary also won Game 2.
10 - OF Ethan Allen (Cincinnati letterman in 1924-25 and 1925-26) and P Jim Mooney (played for East Tennessee State) traded by the New York Giants to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1932. . . . Increasing his hitting streak in World Series competition to eight in a row, Philadelphia Athletics SS Jack Barry (letterman for Holy Cross in 1908) banged out two doubles among three safeties against the New York Giants in Game 4 of 1913 World Series. . . . 1B Kevin "Chuck" Connors (scored 32 points in 15 varsity games for Seton Hall in 1941-42 before leaving school for military service) traded by the Brooklyn Dodgers to the Chicago Cubs in 1950. Connors, star of the television series The Rifleman, gained critical acclaim playing the role of a slave owner in the TV mini-series Roots (1977). . . . In the 1961 expansion draft, the New York Mets selected P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman team) from the Los Angeles Dodgers, OF John DeMerit (letterman for Wisconsin in 1956-57) from the Milwaukee Braves, 1B Gil Hodges (played for Oakland City IN in 1947 and 1948) from the Dodgers and P Jay Hook (Northwestern's third-leading scorer with 10.7 ppg as sophomore in 1955-56) from the Cincinnati Reds. The same expansion draft also had the Houston Colt .45s selecting 1B-OF Dick Gernert (letterman with Temple in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg) from the Reds and P Jim Umbricht (Georgia's captain in 1951-52) from the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for Massachusetts' 15-1 freshman squad in 1971-72) won the 1979 World Series opener against the Pittsburgh Pirates. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers LF "Sweet" Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52) lashed a Game 4 homer in a 7-2 win against the Minnesota Twins in the 1965 World Series. . . . OF Joe Lahoud (letterman for New Haven CT in mid-1960s) traded by the Boston Red Sox to the Milwaukee Brewers in a 10-player swap in 1971. . . . Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) reached base five times with three hits and two walks against the Seattle Mariners in the opener of the 1995 ALCS. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as All-Iowa Conference freshman selection in 1964-65 and 12.1 as sophomore in 1965-66) collected two homers and five RBI in an 11-5 triumph against the New York Yankees in Game 1 of the 1978 World Series. . . . In decisive Game 7, Chicago White Sox P Ted Lyons (two-time All-SWC first-team selection for Baylor in early 1920s) tossed his second five-hit win in the 1939 World Series in City Series against the Cubs. . . . Breaking up a scoreless duel in Game 7 of the 1968 World Series, Detroit Tigers RF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) stroked a decisive seventh-inning triple off St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57). Gibson won his previous seven WS starts. . . . New York Yankees P Marius Russo (member of LIU teams compiling a 50-2 record in 1934-35 and 1935-36 under legendary coach Clair Bee) hurled a complete game and knocked in the decisive run with a double in a 2-1 decision over the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 4 of the 1943 World Series. . . . 1B Bill "Moose" Skowron (scored 18 points in eight games for Purdue in 1949-50) smashed a grand slam to help the New York Yankees win Game 7 of the 1956 World Series against the Brooklyn Dodgers. . . . Kansas City Royals P Paul Splittorff (runner-up in scoring and rebounding for Morningside IA in 1967-68) won Game 2 of the 1976 ALCS with 5 2/3 innings of scoreless relief against the New York Yankees. . . . Philadelphia Athletics SS Dib Williams (played for Hendrix AR in mid-1920s) delivered his third two-hit outing of the 1931 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals.
11 - In 1925, Pittsburgh Pirates LF Clyde Barnhart (played for Shippensburg PA predecessor Cumberland Valley State Normal School prior to World War I) went hitless for the only time in 11 World Series games. . . . In 1948, SS Lou Boudreau (leading scorer for Illinois' 1937 Big Ten Conference co-champion) doubled for the third consecutive World Series contest with the champion Cleveland Indians in Game 6 against the Boston Braves. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Roger Craig (forward with North Carolina State's 1949-50 freshman team) earned a victory by fanning eight New York Yankees batters in 4 2/3 innings of shutout relief in Game 4 of the 1964 World Series. . . . P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) traded by the Houston Astros to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1968. . . . In 1971, Baltimore Orioles P Dick Hall (averaged 12.8 ppg from 1948-49 through 1950-51 with Swarthmore PA for three Southern Division champions in MASC) earned a save in Game 2 of the World Series for the second straight season. . . . P Jim Hearn (Georgia Tech letterman in 1941-42) traded by the New York Giants to the Philadelphia Phillies for P Stu Miller in 1956. . . . INF Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) was the on-deck batter in Japan in 1976 when Sadaharu Oh stroked his 715th homer to pass Babe Ruth's mark. Incredibly, Johnson was also the next hitter in April 1974 when Atlanta Braves OF Hank Aaron hammered his 715th round-tripper. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) hurled a four-hit shutout in Game 5 of the 1965 World Series against the Minnesota Twins. . . . Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) whacked a homer but it wasn't enough to prevent a 5-3 defeat against the New York Yankees in Game 5 of the 1998 ALCS. . . . Rookie RF Bud Metheny (William & Mary letterman from 1935-36 through 1937-38) supplied his lone World Series hit by singling in a 2-0 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 5 to help the New York Yankees clinch the 1943 title. . . . Detroit Tigers OF Jim Northrup (second-leading scorer and third-leading rebounder for Alma MI in 1958-59) drove in the winning run in the bottom of the 10th inning in a 4-3 triumph against the Oakland Athletics in Game 4 of the 1972 ALCS.
12 - St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) won decisive Game 7 against the Boston Red Sox in the 1967 World Series. Gibson helped his cause with a homer. Three years earlier, Gibson whiffed 13 batters in a 10-inning, 5-2 win against the New York Yankees in Game 5 of the 1964 WS. . . New York Yankees OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) socked a homer in a 10-7 triumph against the Boston Red Sox in the opener of the 2004 ALCS. . . . In Game 3, New York Giants Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) tossed his second of three shutouts against the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1905 World Series. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) yielded back-to-back homers to LF George Foster and C Johnny Bench to start the ninth inning as the Cincinnati Reds came from behind to win, 7-6, and sweep their 1976 NLDS. . . . Detroit Tigers P Jeff Robinson (two-time NAIA All-District 3 honoree in early 1980s left Azusa Pacific CA as school's No. 9 all-time scorer) made his lone postseason appearance, hurling 1/3 of an inning against the Minnesota Twins in Game 5 of the 1987 ALCS. . . . Toronto Blue Jays DH-RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) walloped a homer but it was in vain as the Oakland A's avoided elimination with a 6-2 Game 5 victory in the 1992 ALCS.
13 - Los Angeles Dodgers RF Joe Ferguson (member of Pacific's 1967 NCAA playoff team) smacked a homer off Oakland Athletics P Vida Blue, accounting for the game-winning hit in a 3-2 triumph in Game 2 of the 1974 World Series. . . . Unscored upon in all seven postseason relief appearances covering 9 2/3 innings, Pittsburgh Pirates P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) earned a save in Game 4 of the 1971 World Series against the Baltimore Orioles. . . . 1B Gail Hopkins (averaged 2.5 ppg for Pepperdine in 1963-64) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Kansas City Royals in 1970. . . . Frank Howard (two-time All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection when leading Ohio State in scoring and rebounding in 1956-57 and 1957-58) fired as manager of the San Diego Padres in 1981. . . . Atlanta Braves RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) jacked two homers against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Game 6 of the 1992 NLCS. . . . OF Jim Lyttle (led Florida State in free-throw shooting in 1965-66 when averaging 12.4 ppg) traded by the New York Yankees to the Chicago White Sox in 1971. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 1B-OF Len Matuszek (Toledo starter for squad compiling 18-7 record in 1975-76) collected his lone postseason hit, a pinch single against the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 4 of the 1985 NLCS. . . . 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) hit a three-run, first-inning double to spark the New York Yankees to a 3-1 victory against the Oakland A's in the 1981 ALCS opener. Nettles' spectacular defense highlighted a 5-1 triumph for the Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 3 of the 1978 World Series. Nettles whacked two homers in Game 4 of the 1976 ALCS for the Yankees but they weren't enough to prevent a 7-4 loss against the Kansas City Royals. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Eppa Rixey (Virginia letterman in 1912 and 1914) allowed two homers in 6 2/3 innings in a 5-4 defeat against the Boston Red Sox in Game 5 of the 1915 World Series. . . . Baltimore Orioles reliever Tim Stoddard (starting forward opposite All-American David Thompson for North Carolina State's 1974 NCAA champion) won Game 4 against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1979 World Series. . . . In his final MLB and only World Series at-bat, San Diego Padres OF Champ Summers (led SIUE in scoring in 1969-70 after doing same with Nicholls State in 1964-65) fanned as a pinch-hitter against a former teammate (Jack Morris of the Detroit Tigers) in Game 4 of the 1984 WS. . . . CF Bill Virdon (played for Drury MO in 1949) smacked a two-run single to help the Pittsburgh Pirates outlast the New York Yankees, 10-9, in Game 7 of the 1960 World Series.
14 - Montreal Expos P Ray Burris (Southwestern Oklahoma State player) hurled a shutout against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 2 of 1981 NLCS. Five days later in Game 5, Burris yielded only five hits in eight innings. . . . 1B Donn Clendenon (played for Morehouse GA) selected from the Pittsburgh Pirates by the Montreal Expos in 1968 expansion draft. . . . RF Walt French (letterman for Rutgers and Army) struck out as a pinch-hitter but the Philadelphia Athletics rallied for three runs in the bottom of the ninth inning to edge the Chicago Cubs in Game 5 of the 1929 World Series. . . . P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) selected from the St. Louis Cardinals by the San Diego Padres as the third pick in 1968 expansion draft. . . . New York Yankees reliever Steve Hamilton (Morehead State's leading scorer and rebounder in 1956-57 and 1957-58) saved Game 6 in the 1964 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals after replacing starter Jim Bouton. . . . San Francisco Giants P Atlee Hammaker (averaged 5.3 ppg as freshman in 1976-77 and 4.9 as sophomore in 1977-78 under ETSU coach Sonny Smith) lost decisive Game 7 against the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1987 NLCS. . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Bobby Humphreys (four-year letterman graduated from Hampden-Sydney VA in 1958) hurled a scoreless inning of relief against the New York Yankees in Game 6 of the 1964 World Series. . . . New York Yankees OF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) homered in a 5-0 win against the Seattle Mariners in Game 4 of 2000 ALCS. . . . Toiling on two days rest, Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) hurled a three-hit shutout in Game 7 of the 1965 World Series against the Minnesota Twins. Supporting Koufax with a fourth-inning homer was LF "Sweet" Lou Johnson (Kentucky State teammate of legendary coach Davey Whitney averaged 5.7 ppg and 2 rpg in 1951-52). . . . OF Rusty Kuntz (played in J.C. for Cuesta CA) supplied a sacrifice fly in the fifth and decisive game for the champion Detroit Tigers in the 1984 World Series against the San Diego Padres. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Dave Leonhard (averaged 4.8 ppg with Johns Hopkins MD in 1961-62) hurled a scoreless inning of relief against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Game 5 of the 1971 World Series. . . . OF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling a 35-3 record) delivered the game-winning safety in the bottom of the ninth inning against the St. Louis Cardinals in the 2002 NLCS to send the San Francisco Giants to the World Series. . . . In Game 5, New York Giants Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) tossed his third shutout against the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1905 World Series. . . . Philadelphia Phillies RF Bake McBride (averaged 12.7 ppg and 8.1 rpg in 21 games with Westminster MO in 1968-69 and 1969-70) banged out a postseason career-high three hits, including a three-run homer, in a 7-6 decision over the Kansas City Royals in the opener of the 1980 World Series. . . . New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) singled twice in a seven-run fourth inning in Game 2 of the 1981 ALCS against the Oakland A's to become the first player ever to collect two safeties in a single frame in LCS competition. . . . P George Stone (averaged 14.7 ppg and 6.5 rpg for Louisiana Tech in 1965-66) notched a save in Game 2 of the 1973 World Series when the New York Mets outlasted the Oakland A's, 10-7, in 12 innings. . . . INF Gary Sutherland (Southern California's fifth-leading scorer in 1963-64 when averaging 7.4 ppg) selected from the Philadelphia Phillies by the Montreal Expos in 1968 expansion draft. . . . 1B-OF Preston Ward (second-leading scorer for Southwest Missouri State in 1946-47 and 1948-49) purchased from the Brooklyn Dodgers by the Chicago Cubs for $100,000 in 1949.
15 - 2B Jerry Adair (one of Oklahoma State's top three scorers in 1956-57 and 1957-58 while ranking among nation's top 12 free-throw shooters each season) selected from the Boston Red Sox by the Kansas City Royals in 1968 expansion draft. . . . New York Yankees rookie P Jim Beattie (Dartmouth's top rebounder in 1974-75 when selected team MVP and honorable mention All-Ivy League) went the distance, striking out eight Los Angeles Dodgers batters in a 12-2 success, in Game 5 of the 1978 World Series. . . . LF Carson "Skeeter" Bigbee (Oregon letterman in 1915) knocked in the tying run with an eighth-inning, pinch-hit double off Hall of Fame P Walter Johnson and scored the go-ahead tally as the Pittsburgh Pirates upended the Washington Senators, 9-7, in Game 7 of the 1925 World Series. . . . OF Bob Cerv (ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his career) purchased from the New York Yankees by the Kansas City Athletics in 1956. . . . In 1957, 2B Jack Dittmer (played for Iowa in 1949-50) traded by the Detroit Tigers to the New York Giants for 2B Wayne Terwilliger (two-year letterman for Western Michigan in late 1940s). . . . St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) won decisive Game 7 against the New York Yankees in the 1964 World Series. . . . Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) stepped down as manager of the Philadelphia Phillies to become general manager of the Chicago Cubs in 1981. . . . OF Hinkey Haines (Penn State letterman in 1919-20 and 1920-21) scored the tying run as a pinch-runner in the eighth inning as the New York Yankees came from behind with three tallies to beat the New York Giants, 6-4, and clinch the 1923 World Series. . . . P Rich Hand (averaged 6.2 ppg for Puget Sound WA in 1967-68) shipped by the California Angels to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1974 to complete an earlier deal. . . . Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) fired as manager of the Cleveland Indians in 1999. . . . Baltimore Orioles 2B Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg in 1961-62 with Texas A&M) supplied a postseason career-high three hits, including a pair of run-producing safeties, against the Cincinnati Reds in Game 5 of the 1970 World Series. . . . In 2001, OF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) whacked a pinch-hit homer to help the New York Yankees defeat the Oakland A's and become the first team ever to capture a best-of-5 series after dropping the first two contests at home. . . . P Don Kaiser (one semester on scholarship at East Central OK) traded by the Milwaukee Braves to the Detroit Tigers in 1959. . . . New York Yankees 3B Graig Nettles (shot 87.8% from free-throw line for San Diego State in 1963-64) notched three RBI in each of three ALCS games against the Oakland Athletics in 1981. . . . Philadelphia Phillies P Ron Reed (Notre Dame's leading rebounder in 1963-64 and 1964-65) earned the save in a 6-4 verdict over the Kansas City Royals in Game 2 of the 1980 World Series. . . . New York Yankees P Rollie Sheldon (third-leading scorer as sophomore for Connecticut's 1960 NCAA Tournament team) retired all six St. Louis Cardinals batters he faced in Game 7 of the 1964 World Series.
16 - In Game 5, 1B Donn Clendenon (played for Morehouse GA) homered in his third consecutive appearance against the Baltimore Orioles to help power the New York Mets to the 1969 World Series title. . . . Hall of Fame P Robin Roberts (Michigan State's second-leading scorer in 1945-46 and 1946-47) purchased from the Philadelphia Phillies by the New York Yankees in 1961. . . . 1B Dick Siebert (played for Concordia-St. Paul MN in 1929 and 1930) traded by the Philadelphia Athletics to the St. Louis Browns in 1945. . . . Baltimore Orioles RF Ken Singleton (Hofstra freshman squad in mid-1960s) supplied his second three-hit game in the 1979 World Series against the Pittsburgh Pirates.
17 - OF George Altman (appeared in 1953 and 1954 NAIA Tournament with Tennessee State) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1962. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) started decisive Game 7 of the 1979 World Series but wasn't involved in the decision (4-1 win against the Baltimore Orioles). . . . New York Yankees 1B Tony Clark (San Diego State's leading scorer in WAC games in 1991-92) contributed his only RBI in 37 postseason at-bats (against the Boston Red Sox in Game 4 of the 2004 ALCS). . . . Alvin Dark (letterman for Louisiana State and Louisiana-Lafayette during World War II) fired as manager of the Oakland A's in 1975. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers C Joe Ferguson (member of Pacific's 1967 NCAA playoff team) stroked two doubles off New York Yankees P Catfish Hunter in Game 6 of the 1978 World Series. . . . San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) secured three hits, including his lone postseason homer, in the opener of the 1998 World Series against the New York Yankees. . . . OF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85), winner of the 2000 ALCS MVP award, contributed a three-run homer to help the New York Yankees defeat the Seattle Mariners, 9-7. . . . P Roger Mason (multiple-year letterman in late 1970s for Saginaw Valley State MI) registered a hold for the Philadelphia Phillies in Game 2 of the 1993 World Series but yielded his only run in 11 career postseason relief appearances. . . . After winning the opener of the 1911 World Series, New York Giants Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) took a shutout into the ninth inning in Game 3 when 3B John Baker belted a contest-tying homer for the Philadelphia Athletics, who went on to win in the 11th frame. The clutch blast helped him become known as "Home Run" Baker. . . . P Lindy McDaniel (played for Oklahoma's 1954-55 freshman squad) traded by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Chicago Cubs in 1962. . . . Pittsburgh Pirates reliever Kent Tekulve (played as freshman in mid-1960s for Marietta OH) notched a save in decisive Game 7 of the 1979 World Series against the Baltimore Orioles.
18 - P Jim Bibby (Fayetteville State NC backup player and brother of UCLA All-American Henry Bibby) traded by the New York Mets to the St. Louis Cardinals in an eight-player swap in 1971. . . . Boston Red Sox P Bruce Hurst (played J.C. for Dixie UT in mid-1970s) notched a 1-0 victory against the New York Mets in the 1986 World Series opener.
19 - P Bob Garibaldi (starting forward for Santa Clara in 1961-62 when averaging 10.6 ppg and 5.6 rpg) traded by the San Francisco Giants to the Kansas City Royals in 1970. . . . Kansas City Royals LF Lynn Jones (averaged 10.4 ppg for Thiel PA from 1970-71 through 1973-74) contributed a pinch-hit triple against the St. Louis Cardinals in the opener of the 1985 World Series. . . . In 1978, Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) named player-manager of the Chicago White Sox after they dismissed Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist). . . . St. Louis Cardinals P John Stuper (two-time all-conference junior college in mid-1970s with Butler County PA) tossed a four-hitter in a 13-1 romp over the Milwaukee Brewers in Game 6 of the 1982 World Series.
20 - Texas Rangers P Mike Adams (played for Texas A&M-Kingsville in 1996-97) registered a victory in Game 2 of the 2011 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . Philadelphia Athletics SS Jack Barry (letterman for Holy Cross in 1908) contributed three hits and three runs against the Chicago Cubs in Game 3 of the 1910 World Series. . . . St. Louis Cardinals 2B Frankie Frisch (Fordham captain) captured the 1931 N.L. MVP. . . . Detroit Tigers 1B Hank Greenberg (attended NYU briefly on basketball scholarship in late 1920s) won 1935 A.L. MVP. . . . Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) named manager of the Seattle Mariners in 2004.
21 - 1B Bill Davis (averaged 12.5 ppg in 1963-64 for Minnesota team including eventual NBA standouts Archie Clark and Lou Hudson) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the San Diego Padres in 1968. . . . Kansas City Royals P Rich Gale (led New Hampshire with 7.2 rpg in 1975-76) lost Game 6 when the Philadelphia Phillies clinched the 1980 World Series championship. . . . P Dave Giusti (made 6 of 10 field-goal attempts in two games for Syracuse in 1959-60) traded with C Dave Ricketts (Duquesne's leading scorer with 17.9 ppg in 1956-57) by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1969. . . . San Diego Padres RF Tony Gwynn (All-WAC second-team selection with San Diego State in 1979-80 and 1980-81) provided his third multiple-hit game in four World Series contests against the New York Yankees in 1998. . . . In 1995 opener against the Atlanta Braves, Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four squad compiling 35-3 record) became the first player since 1921 to steal two bases in one inning of a World Series game. . . . P Joe Niekro (averaged 8.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for West Liberty WV from 1963-64 through 1965-66) made his lone World Series appearance, hurling two innings of shutout relief for the Minnesota Twins in Game 4 of the 1987 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. . . . P Claude Passeau (played for Millsaps MS in late 1920s and early 1930s) traded by the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1935. . . . OF Richie Scheinblum (averaged 6.1 ppg and 3.6 rpg in 1962-63 and 1963-64 with LIU-C.W. Post) purchased from the Texas Rangers by the Kansas City Royals in 1971.
22 - P Danny Coombs (Seton Hall's third-leading scorer and rebounder in 1961-62) purchased from the Houston Astros by the San Diego Padres in 1969. . . . C Art Kusnyer (led Kent State in field-goal percentage in 1965-66 when he was team's third-leading scorer and rebounder) traded by the California Angels to the Milwaukee Brewers in a nine-player swap in 1973. . . . OF Joe Lahoud (letterman for New Haven CT in mid-1960s) traded by the Milwaukee Brewers to the California Angels in a nine-player swap in 1973.
23 - Boston Red Sox P Bruce Hurst (played J.C. for Dixie UT in mid-1970s) notched a 4-2 complete-game victory against the New York Mets in Game 5 of the 1986 World Series. . . . Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) hired as manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1998. . . . Kansas City Royals LF Lynn Jones (averaged 10.4 ppg for Thiel PA from 1970-71 through 1973-74) contributed a pinch-hit double against the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 4 of the 1985 World Series. . . . Gene Michael (Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58) replaced by Bob Watson as general manager of the New York Yankees in 1995. . . . INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons for UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41) signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1945, paving the way for MLB integration. . . . OF Richie Scheinblum (averaged 6.1 ppg and 3.6 rpg in 1962-63 and 1963-64 with LIU-C.W. Post) purchased from the Cleveland Indians by the Washington Senators in 1970.
24 - Philadelphia Athletics SS Jack Barry (letterman for Holy Cross in 1908) stroked two doubles among his three hits in a 4-2 Game 4 victory against the New York Giants and Hall of Fame P Christy Mathewson (played for Bucknell at turn of 20th Century) in the 1911 World Series. . . . Securing at least one steal in his seventh consecutive postseason contest, Cleveland Indians CF Kenny Lofton (Arizona's leader in steals for 1988 Final Four team compiling 35-3 record) went 3-for-3, scored three runs and received three walks in a 7-6 win against the Atlanta Braves in Game 3 of the 1995 World Series. Seven years later with the San Francisco Giants, Lofton provided three hits for the second straight game in the 2002 World Series against the Anaheim Angels. . . . Los Angeles Dodgers 2B Davey Lopes (NAIA All-District 15 selection for Iowa Wesleyan averaged 16.9 ppg as All-Iowa Conference freshman selection in 1964-65 and 12.1 as sophomore in 1965-66) supplied the game-winning RBI in an 8-7 victory against the New York Yankees in Game 4 of the 1981 World Series. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers INF Jackie Robinson (highest scoring average in PCC both of his seasons for UCLA in 1939-40 and 1940-41), the first black major leaguer of the 20th Century, died of heart disease at the age of 53 in 1972. . . . DH-RF Dave Winfield (starting forward with Minnesota's first NCAA playoff team in 1972) banged out a two-out, two-run double in the top of the 11th inning to spark the Toronto Blue Jays to their first World Series championship with a 4-3 decision over the Atlanta Braves in Game 6 in 1992.
25 - OF Larry Doby (reserve guard for Virginia Union's 1943 CIAA titlist) traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Chicago White Sox in 1955. . . . C Tom Haller (backup forward for Illinois in 1956-57 and 1957-58 under coach Harry Combes) purchased from the Detroit Tigers by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1972. . . . 1B Mike Hargrove (Northwestern Oklahoma State letterman) traded by the Texas Rangers to the San Diego Padres in 1978. . . . In 1977, P Jim Todd (played for Parsons IA before averaging 16 ppg with Millersville State PA in 1968-69) shipped by the Chicago Cubs to the Seattle Mariners to complete an earlier deal in the spring.
26 - Detroit Tigers OF Hank Greenberg (attended NYU briefly on basketball scholarship in late 1920s) won 1940 A.L. MVP. . . . In 1960, Washington Senators President Calvin Griffith (letterman in 1934 and 1935 when George Washington compiled 25-10 record) made decision to move franchise to the Minneapolis/St. Paul area. . . . P Oral Hildebrand (All-American for Butler in 1928-29 and 1929-30) traded by the St. Louis Browns to the New York Yankees in 1938. . . . P Sonny Siebert (team-high 16.7 ppg for Mizzou in 1957-58 as All-Big Eight Conference second-team selection) traded by the Texas Rangers to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1973.
27 - SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) traded with 1B Bill White (played two years with Hiram OH in early 1950s) and C Bob Uecker by the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies for C Pat Corrales, OF Alex Johnson and P Art Mahaffey in 1965.
28 - St. Louis Cardinals P Bob Gibson (Creighton's leading scorer in 1955-56 and 1956-57) captured the Cy Young Award in 1968. . . . A homer by Atlanta Braves RF David Justice (led Thomas More KY in assists in 1984-85) against the Cleveland Indians accounted for the only run in Game 6 of the 1995 World Series as the Braves became the first franchise to win championships representing three different cities (previously Boston and Milwaukee). . . . SS Don Kessinger (three-time All-SEC selection for Mississippi from 1961-62 through 1963-64 while finishing among nation's top 45 scorers each year) traded by the Chicago Cubs to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1975. . . . OF Randy Winn (Santa Clara backcourtmate of eventual two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Steve Nash in 1993-94) traded by the Tampa Bay Devil Rays to the Seattle Mariners in 2002.
29 - Dallas Green (Delaware's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1954-55) stepped down as president and general manager of the Chicago Cubs in 1987. . . . OF Wally Roettger (Illinois letterman in 1921-22 and 1922-23) purchased from the New York Giants by the Cincinnati Reds in 1930.
30 - Los Angeles Dodgers P Sandy Koufax (Cincinnati's freshman squad in 1953-54) and St. Louis Cardinals SS Dick Groat (two-time All-American with Duke in 1950-51 and 1951-52 when finishing among nation's top five scorers each season) finished 1-2 in N.L. MVP voting in 1963. . . . 1B Gary Holle (Siena's scoring and rebounding leader in 1974-75 and 1975-76) traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1981. . . . Davey Johnson (averaged 1.7 ppg with Texas A&M in 1961-62) hired as manager of the Baltimore Orioles in 1995.
31 - SS Alvin Dark (basketball letterman for LSU and USL during World War II) traded by the Milwaukee Braves to the San Francisco Giants in 1960. . . . Baltimore Orioles P Mike Flanagan (averaged 13.9 ppg for Massachusetts' 15-1 freshman squad in 1971-72) named winner of the 1979 A.L. Cy Young Award.

MLB achievements in September by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in August by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in July by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in June by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in May by former college basketball players

MLB achievements in April by former college basketball players

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed