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Welcome to CollegeHoopedia.com! This tell-it-like-it-is treasure trove of facts, statistical analysis and edgy opinion is unique because it catalogs the matchless performances of uncommon participants. Much of this dig-deep information you can't find anywhere else among banal boosterism and vacuous coverage offered by sports-bar herd animals couldn't have been assembled without securing take-no-prisoners input from a vigorous variety of old-school basketball resources and passionate fans. We offer a hearty thank-you for visiting this politically-incorrect salient site and seeking to enhance your contemporary and historical perspectives of college hoops plus possibly know more about us as a fiercely independent voice you can trust. We devoutly study the sport and will be chafed to the point of enemies-list snarky whenever our ideals are threatened by stuck-on-stupid presstitutes never having an intimate relationship with the unvarnished truth. Unflinchingly amid a pathetic PC cultural cleansing right out of Nation magazine's style-book, there will be no unmasking mercy on any facts-allergic or cowardly echo-chamber wastes of perfectly good oxygen we believe are violating the game's integrity. Some inquisitive and acerbic individual needs to robustly and unapologetically exhibit intestinal fortitude expressing utter contempt for chronically-clueless gasbags ritualistically dwelling on what they "feel" you want to read and hear rather than distributing facts you need to "know." If beer-goggle donning reign-of-error media types are persistent annoyance, click here if you want to follow our incisive information and combative truth on Twitter. We reject the simplistic church of group-think hierarchy among pedestrian pundits embracing sacred-cow conformity comparable to many of the embellishing follow-the-pack national and lazy local media lemmings predictably trivializing verifiable truth and contrary creativity. To those who never really learned their craft, there's a huge difference between covering a school and covering up for a school. Unabashedly, we aspire to be an irreverent and visionary three-dimensional "player" - respecting life lessons from the past, portraying the present with pithy and prickly posturing plus keeping a keen eye for "teaching moments" in the future. Knowledge is power and sunlight is the best disinfectant! Nowhere else will you get this type of hoops "intel." If necessary in combating intellect inequality, let wispy words be your weapons warehouse.

Men For All Seasons: Will Former College Hooper Excel in NFL Playoffs as TE?

If you need more unassailable evidence proving who are the best team-sport athletes in the world, check out some of the premier tight ends in NFL history (past and present). A striking number of the Drago-like specimens at that rigorous position thus far this century have been former college basketball players.

As the NFL playoffs commence this campaign, consider what kind of "picks" do you think imposing Mike Ditka (Pittsburgh) and John Mackey (Syracuse) set back in the day before the Big East Conference was formed. Wouldn't you love to see LeBron James maneuver down the field like Charles Atlas the same way he does when forcefully driving down the lane?

Although ex-California hoopster Tony Gonzalez failed to reach the 2013 postseason with the Atlanta Falcons in his quest to finally win a playoff game before retiring, succeeding in the NFL remains a "Battle of the Titans" at the TE position. Bursting on the scene at the same position as Gonzalez departed was fellow ex-college hooper Julius Thomas. The most sought-after free agent four years ago after originally being a relatively obscure player for the Denver Broncos until emerging as their runner-up in touchdowns with 12 and contributing a team-high eight pass receptions in an AFC title-game victory against the New England Patriots. Thomas, an All-Big Sky Conference hoopster with Portland State, flashed potential as the next game-changing tight end when he caught nine touchdown passes in the Broncos' first five games three seasons ago en route to signing with the Jacksonville Jaguars. A 74-yard TD strike to "It's So Easy" at San Diego in mid-season four years ago illustrated how QB Peyton Manning capitalized on Thomas' athleticism the same way he did ex-hoopster Marcus Pollard (Bradley) with the Indianapolis Colts. Pollard, a J.C. transfer who was the Braves' leading rebounder in 1992-93, caught at least three touchdown passes each of Manning's first seven NFL seasons from 1998 through 2004.

Ditka, muzzled by ESPC for boasting sufficient fortitude to tackle mom-jeans POTUS, had a quality successor as an ex-hooper tight end with the Bears in Martellus Bennett (Texas A&M) before Bennett wound up with the New England Patriots and last season's Super Bowl. Who will be the next hooper joining up the following list of Top 25 NFL tight ends who were former college basketball players:

Rank Former College Hooper Alma Mater Summary of NFL Tight End Career
1. Tony Gonzalez California First tight end in NFL history with 100 touchdowns completed his 17-year career in 2013 with 1,325 receptions for 15,127 yards and 111 TDs. He was 13-time Pro Bowl selection.
2. Antonio Gates Kent State Set an NFL single-season record with 13 TD receptions in 2004 en route to becoming San Diego Chargers' all-time leader for TD catches, receptions and receiving yards.
3. Mike Ditka Pittsburgh Five-time Pro Bowl selection caught 427 passes for 5,812 yards and 43 TDs in 12 seasons.
4. John Mackey Syracuse Hall of Famer caught 331 passes for 5,236 yards and 38 TDs in 10 seasons.
5. Jimmy Graham Miami (Fla.) Led New Orleans Saints in pass receptions in 2012 and 2013. Twice has had streaks of at least four games with more than 100 yards in pass receptions. After only four years, he ranked second all-time among New Orleans Saints' tight ends in receiving before transitioning to the Seattle Seahawks.
6. Todd Heap Arizona State Caught 467 passes for 5,492 yards and 41 TDs with the Baltimore Ravens from 2001 through 2010, leading them in receptions in 2002 with 68.
7. Ben Coates Livingstone (N.C.) Established NFL single-season record for most receptions by a TE with 96 in 1994.
8. Marcus Pollard Bradley Finished his 13-year career with 349 receptions for 4,280 yards and 40 TDs (long of 86 yards in 2001 midway through stint as starter for the Indianapolis Colts).
9. Pete Metzelaars Wabash (Ind.) Played in more games at TE than any player in NFL history when he retired. Led the Buffalo Bills with 68 receptions in 1993.
10. Julius Thomas Portland State Began 2014 campaign with a bang by catching three first-half TD passes in season opener from Peyton Manning en route to nine TDs in first five games for the Denver Broncos. Thomas, Denver's runner-up with 12 TD receptions the previous year, went on to sign as a high-value free agent with the Jacksonville Jaguars.
11. Martellus Bennett Texas A&M Caught 348 passes for 3,586 yards and 23 TDs with the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants and Chicago Bears in first eight years from 2008 through 2015 prior to trade to New England Patriots.
12. Joe Senser West Chester State (Pa.) Caught 165 passes for 1,822 yards and 16 TDs in four-year career with the Minnesota Vikings in early 1980s.
13. Andrew Glover Grambling State Caught at least one TD pass each of his 10 pro seasons from 1991 through 2000, finishing with 208 receptions for 2,478 yards and 24 TDs.
14. Rich McGeorge Elon (N.C.) Caught 175 passes for 2,370 yards and 13 TDs with the Green Bay Packers in nine years from 1970 through 1978.
15. Rickey Dudley Ohio State Scored 29 TDs in five seasons with the Oakland Raiders before hooking on with two other teams.
16. Derrick Ramsey Kentucky Caught 188 passes for 2,364 yards and 21 TDs with three different teams from 1978 to 1987.
17. Jordan Cameron BYU/Southern California Blossomed in third year with Cleveland Browns in 2013, catching 80 passes for 917 yards and seven TDs (three in game at Minnesota). He had three contests with at least nine receptions.
18. Jean Fugett Amherst (Mass.) Caught 156 passes for 2,270 yards and 28 TDs with the Dallas Cowboys and Washington Redskins in eight years from 1972 through 1979.
19. Kevin Boss Western Oregon Caught 150 passes for 2,033 yards and 22 TDs with the New York Giants, Oakland Raiders and Kansas City Chiefs in six years from 2007 through 2012. His 45-yard pass reception sparked a fourth-quarter TD drive for the Giants in their 17-14 win against the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLII.
20. Reuben Gant Oklahoma State Caught 127 passes for 1,850 yards and 15 TDs with the Buffalo Bills in seven seasons from 1974 through 1980.
21. Bob Windsor Kentucky Caught 185 passes for 2,307 yards and 14 TDs with the San Francisco 49ers and New England Patriots in nine years from 1967 through 1975.
22. Keith McKeller Jacksonville State (Ala.) Caught 124 passes for 1,464 yards and 11 TDs with the Buffalo Bills in seven years from 1987 through 1993.
23. Greg Latta Morgan State (Md.) Caught 90 passes for 1,081 yards and seven TDs with the Chicago Bears in five years from 1975 through 1979.
24. Pat Richter Wisconsin Caught 99 passes for 1,315 yards and 14 TDs in nine seasons for the Washington Redskins after being their first-round pick in 1962.
T25. Al Dixon Iowa State Caught 84 passes for 1,248 yards and eight TDs with four different teams from 1977 through 1984.
T25. Jeff King Virginia Tech Registered 93 receptions for 802 yards and seven TDs with the Carolina Panthers and Arizona Cardinals in first seven years from 2006 through 2012.
T25. Dee Mackey East Texas State Caught 94 passes for 1,352 yards and eight TDs in six NFL/AFL seasons from 1960 through 1965.
T25. Ulysses Norris Georgia Best season of seven-year career was in 1983 when he had seven TDs with the Detroit Lions.
T25. Morris Stroud Jr. Clark Atlanta Believed to be the tallest TE (6-10) in NFL history, he caught 54 passes for 977 yards and seven TDs with the Kansas City Chiefs in five years from 1970 through 1974.

Markus Hangs 52: Single-Game Scoring Standards By Individual Opponents

When Marquette sophomore guard Markus Howard tallied 52 points at Providence, the eruption triggered research regarding which individual opponent has the highest single-game scoring outburst against each major university. Howard's "bomb cyclone" outburst not only established a school record but also set the individual standard by an opponent against PC.

Furman's Darrell Floyd and Frank Selvy collaborated for a total of nine scoring records in this category existing since the mid-1950s. Such scorched-earth outputs have been difficult to come by thus far in the 21st Century (unofficially eight uprisings). Many schools don't keep track of a standard perhaps reflecting a mite negatively upon them but following is what CollegeHoopedia.com unearthed on the topic:

Scorched School Single-Game Record Holder Opponent Points Date
Air Force Adrian Dantley Notre Dame 49 2-10-75
Alabama Pete Maravich Louisiana State 69 1-7-70
American University* Charlie Davis Wake Forest 51 2-15-69
Appalachian State Bob McCurdy Richmond 53 2-26-75
Arizona Bob Beckel Air Force 50 2-29-59
Arizona State Casey Jacobsen Stanford 49 1-31-82
Arkansas Oscar Robertson Cincinnati 56 3-15-58
Auburn Pete Maravich Louisiana State 55 1-3-68
Austin Peay Tom Chilton East Tennessee State 52 2-5-61
Austin Peay Marvin Barnes Providence 52 12-15-73
Ball State Doug Collins Illinois State 55 1-15-72
Baylor Johnny Neumann Mississippi 60 12-29-70
Boise State* Willie Humes Idaho State 51 12-1-69
Boston College* Wayne Estes Utah State 52 12-30-64
Bradley Archie Tullos Detroit 49 2-22-88
Brigham Young Billy McGill Utah 60 2-24-62
Brown Jim Barton Dartmouth 48 2-7-87
Bucknell Daren Queenan Lehigh 49 3-7-87
Butler Austin Carr Notre Dame 50 2-23-70
California Eddie House Arizona State 61 1-8-00
UC Irvine Hersey Hawkins Bradley 51 12-19-87
Canisius Calvin Murphy Niagara 48 1-13-68
Chicago State Ryan Toolson Utah Valley 63 1-29-09
Cincinnati Frank Selvy Furman 50 12-31-53
The Citadel Darrell Floyd Furman 62 1-14-56
Clemson Darrell Floyd Furman 56 2-24-55
Cleveland State Ed McFarland Slippery Rock (Pa.) 52 2-15-61
Colgate Jack Foley Holy Cross 55 3-5-60
Colorado Wilt Chamberlain Kansas 45 12-29-56
Colorado State Marvin Johnson New Mexico 50 3-2-78
Connecticut Jack Foley Holy Cross 56 2-17-62
Cornell* Bill Bradley Princeton 49 1-17-64
Creighton* Clarence "Bevo" Francis Rio Grande (Ohio) 49 1-23-54
Davidson Frank Selvy Furman 50 2-26-54
Dayton Scott Haffner Evansville 65 2-18-89
Delaware Phil D'Arrigo Haverford (Pa.) 52 2-18-56
DePaul* Austin Carr Notre Dame 51 1-14-70
Detroit Hersey Hawkins Bradley 63 2-22-88
Drake Steve Bracey Tulsa 47 1-8-72
Drexel Eddie Benton Vermont 54 1-29-94
Duke Ernie Beck Pennsylvania 47 12-30-52
Duquesne Pete Maravich Louisiana State 53 12-30-68
East Carolina Ray Simpson Furman 45 2-5-72
East Carolina Randy Culpepper Texas-El Paso 45 2-13-10
Fairfield Elvin Hayes Houston 48 1-29-68
Florida Chris Jackson Louisiana State 53 12-10-88
Florida International Kevin Bradshaw U.S. International 59 1-14-91
Florida State* Anthony Roberts Oral Roberts 50 3-1-77
Fordham Kevin Houston Army 53 2-28-87
Fresno State Askia Jones Kansas State 62 3-24-94
Furman Jay Handlan Washington & Lee (Va.) 66 2-17-51
George Mason Bobby Aguirre Macalester (Minn.) 53 11-29-94
George Washington Allan Bristow Virginia Tech 52 2-21-73
Georgetown John Austin Boston College 49 2-21-64
Georgia Pete Maravich Louisiana State 58 3-8-69
Georgia Southern James "Fly" Williams Austin Peay 51 12-30-72
Georgia Tech Frank Selvy Furman 51 2-11-54
Gonzaga Orlando Lightfoot Idaho 50 12-21-93
Harvard Bill Bradley Princeton 51 2-15-65
Hawaii Marshall Rogers Pan American 47 2-27-76
Houston Phil "Red" Murrell Drake 51 3-3-58
Idaho Bob Houbregs Washington 49 1-10-53
Idaho State Terrell Lowery Loyola Marymount 48 12-1-90
Illinois Von McDade Wisconsin-Milwaukee 50 12-3-90
Illinois State Richie Fuqua Oral Roberts 49 2-14-73
Indiana* Austin Carr Notre Dame 54 12-15-70
Iowa Rick Mount Purdue 61 2-28-70
Iowa State John Douglas Kansas 46 2-16-77
Iowa State Wayman Tisdale Oklahoma 46 2-5-83
Jacksonville Rick Barry Miami (Fla.) 52 1963-64
James Madison David Robinson Navy 45 1-10-87
Kansas Lindsey Hunter Jackson State 48 12-27-92
Kansas State Doremus Bennerman Siena 51 3-30-94
Kent State* Dave Jamerson Ohio University 52 2-24-90
Kentucky Pete Maravich Louisiana State 64 2-21-70
Lamar Dwight "Bo" Lamar Southwestern Louisiana 51 2-17-72
La Salle Calvin Murphy Niagara 52 12-16-67
Long Beach State Raymond Lewis Cal State Los Angeles 53 2-23-73
Long Island Izett Buchanan Marist 51 2-12-94
Louisiana-Lafayette Jimmy Leach Northwestern State 54 2-27-59
Louisiana-Monroe Dwight "Bo" Lamar Southwestern Louisiana 62 2-25-71
Louisiana State Johnny Neumann Mississippi 63 1-30-71
Louisiana Tech Dwight "Bo" Lamar Southwestern Louisiana 51 2-14-72
Louisville Joel Curbelo American (Puerto Rico) 47 11-24-95
Loyola of Chicago Donald Smith Dayton 52 2-3-73
Loyola of Chicago Kareem Townes La Salle 52 2-4-95
Loyola Marymount Kevin Bradshaw U.S. International 72 1-5-91
Manhattan Tom Schwester St. Peter's 53 2-28-70
Marquette Elvin Hayes Houston 45 12-29-67
Massachusetts Frank McLaughlin New Hampshire 44 1-14-56
Memphis Bill Walton UCLA 44 3-26-73
Mercer Frank Selvy Furman 63 2-11-53
Miami (Fla.) Danny Ferry Duke 58 12-10-88
Michigan Dave Schellhase Purdue 57 2-19-66
Michigan State Jimmy Rayl Indiana 56 2-23-63
Middle Tennessee State Clem Haskins Western Kentucky 55 1-30-65
Milwaukee Bob Portman Creighton 51 12-16-67
Minnesota Jimmy Rayl Indiana 56 1-27-62
Mississippi Chris Jackson Louisiana State 55 3-4-89
Mississippi State Pete Maravich Louisiana State 58 12-22-67
Missouri Isaac "Bud" Stallworth Kansas 50 2-26-72
Missouri State Harold Robertson Lincoln (Mo.) 45 1-31-76
Montana Billy McGill Utah 53 2-10-62
Montana State* Willie Humes Idaho State 53 2-20-71
Morehead State Darrell Floyd Furman 67 1-22-55
Navy Rob Feaster Holy Cross 46 2-19-94
Nebraska Wilt Chamberlain Kansas 46 2-8-58
Nebraska Joe Scott Missouri 46 3-6-61
Nebraska George Stone Marshall 46 3-13-67
Nevada William "Bird" Averitt Pepperdine 57 1-6-73
New Orleans Doug Collins Illinois State 57 1-3-73
Nicholls State Glynn Saulters Northeast Louisiana 51 2-1-68
North Carolina Dick Groat Duke 48 2-29-52
North Carolina A&T Anthony Roberts Oral Roberts 66 2-19-77
North Carolina State John Mengelt Auburn 45 12-5-70
North Texas Oscar Robertson Cincinnati 62 2-6-60
Northern Arizona Willie Humes Idaho State 51 1-15-71
Northern Illinois Robert "Bubbles" Hawkins Illinois State 58 2-20-74
Northwestern Wilt Chamberlain Kansas 52 12-5-56
Notre Dame Marshon Brooks Providence 52 2-23-11
Ohio University Austin Carr Notre Dame 61 3-7-70
Ohio State Don Schlundt Indiana 47 1-18-54
Ohio State Don Schlundt Indiana 47 3-5-55
Oklahoma Cliff Meely Colorado 47 2-15-71
Oklahoma State Dwight "Bo" Lamar Southwestern Louisiana 46 12-19-70
Oklahoma State Donnie Boyce Colorado 46 3-5-94
Old Dominion Charles McKinney Norfolk State 54 2-23-70
Oral Roberts Michael Watson Missouri-Kansas City 54 2-22-03
Oregon Anthony Roberts Oral Roberts 65 3-9-77
Oregon State Greg "Bo" Kimble Loyola Marymount 53 12-9-89
Pacific Ed Ratleff Long Beach State 43 1-30-72
Pacific Raymond Lewis Cal State Los Angeles 43 3-2-73
Penn Paul Anderson Dartmouth 41 2-26-83
Penn Ralph James Harvard 41 2-10-90
Penn State Eric Riggins Rutgers 51 2-21-87
Pepperdine Carlos "Bud" Ogden Santa Clara 55 3-3-67
Pittsburgh Eric Murdock Providence 48 1-23-91
Portland Elgin Baylor Seattle 60 1-30-58
Portland State Mike Olliver Lamar 50 1-12-80
Providence Markus Howard Marquette 52 1-3-18
Purdue Bob Lanier St. Bonaventure 50 12-30-69
Rhode Island George Mikan DePaul 53 3-21-45
Rice Jermaine Taylor UCF 45 2-25-09
Robert Morris Steve Stielper James Madison 51 1-27-79
Rutgers Tom Garrick Rhode Island 50 3-7-88
Saint Francis (Pa.) Ron Guziak Duquesne 50 3-6-68
St. John's Pete Maravich Louisiana State 53 12-29-69
Saint Joseph's Greg "Bo" Kimble Loyola Marymount 54 1-4-90
Saint Louis Bob Kurland Oklahoma A&M 58 2-22-46
Saint Mary's Jim McCloskey Loyola Marymount 49 1-4-80
Saint Peter's Bob Zawoluk St. John's 65 3-3-50
Sam Houston State Don Boldenbuck Houston 50 2-17-55
San Jose State Lee Nailon Texas Christian 44 2-7-98
Santa Clara Nick Galis Seton Hall 48 12-22-78
Seton Hall Oscar Robertson Cincinnati 56 1-9-58
South Carolina Frank Selvy Furman 48 1-8-54
Southern California Gary Payton Oregon State 58 2-22-90
Southern Illinois Rick Whitlow Illinois State 51 1-4-75
Southern Methodist Hal Lear Temple 48 3-23-56
Southern Mississippi Johnny Neumann Mississippi 57 12-15-70
Syracuse Calvin Murphy Niagara 68 12-7-68
Temple Aaric Murray Texas Southern 48 12-18-13
Tennessee Jodie Meeks Kentucky 54 1-13-09
Tennessee Tech Tilman Bevely Youngstown State 55 1-26-87
Texas Gene Phillips Southern Methodist 51 3-2-71
Texas Chris Jackson Louisiana State 51 1-2-90
Texas A&M Martin Terry Arkansas 46 1-22-72
Texas Christian Austin Carr Notre Dame 52 3-13-71
Texas-San Antonio Wayman Tisdale Oklahoma 61 12-28-83
Towson Derell Thompson Maryland-Baltimore County 43 2-15-92
Tulane Pete Maravich Louisiana State 66 2-10-69
Tulsa Bruce King Pan American 49 12-28-74
UAB Wesley Person Auburn 44 12-16-93
UCLA Austin Carr Notre Dame 46 1-23-71
UNLV Freeman Williams Portland State 50 2-18-78
Utah State John Coughran California 47 1-31-72
Valparaiso Elvin Hayes Houston 62 2-24-68
Vanderbilt Pete Maravich Louisiana State 61 12-11-69
Villanova Ronnie Shavlik North Carolina State 49 1-29-55
Virginia Len Chappell Wake Forest 50 2-12-62
Virginia Tech Elvin Hayes Houston 51 3-2-68
Wake Forest Butch Zatezalo Clemson 46 2-18-69
Washington John Block Southern California 45 2-11-66
Washington State Lew Alcindor UCLA 61 2-25-67
Weber State Dave Wagnon Idaho State 47 2-25-66
Western Kentucky Ken Durrett La Salle 45 1-16-71
Western Michigan Howard Komives Bowling Green State 49 1-11-64
West Virginia Austin Carr Notre Dame 55 2-21-70
Wichita State Bill Bradley Princeton 58 3-30-65
Wisconsin Terry Dischinger Purdue 50 1-27-62
Wofford Frank Selvy Furman 58 2-23-54
Wright State Tommie Johnson Central Michigan 53 12-22-87
Wyoming Bennie Lennox Texas A&M 53 12-28-63
Yale Rick Barry Miami (Fla.) 45 12-28-64

*Unofficial.

Fall-Americans: Schools Take Risks Simply to Post Few More Victories

A striking number of schools are willing to take risks to try to keep up with the Basketball Jones' Top 10 rather than simply be ranked in the Top 25 or reach NCAA playoff field of 68. In order to win a few more games and enhance prospects of advancing to the Final Four, they are willing to accept marginal "necessary-obligation" problems.

It is a good thing notorious criminals David Berkowitz, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer, Albert DeSalvo, John Wayne Gacy, Donald Harvey, Ted Kacynski, Charles Manson, Timothy McVeigh, Dennis Rader, Richard Ramirez and Wayne Williams weren't 4- or 5-star recruits. Coaches expect us to believe prize prospects arrive on campus as authentic student-athletes knowing precisely how to assemble class schedule without silver-platter input citing no-risk-to-eligibility courses. Any "stable genius" knows nothing could be further from the truth amid the institutional self-interest. What was the average SAT score difference between the Fall-Americans acknowledged below and the everyday student attending same institution?

For decades, this scholastic sham has been stacking up as farce devaluing many diplomas and denigrating the mission of higher education. Sixty-eight is a magic number when it comes to participating in the NCAA Tournament. But it is a tragic number when a higher total of the following All-Americans - including recent downfalls for Chuck Person and Kermit Washington - fell off their lofty pedestal:

Kenny Anderson, Georgia Tech (coached by Bobby Cremins) - Despite earning close to $63 million in his NBA career, he declared bankruptcy shortly after retiring in 2005. "When you're an athlete, there is always someone holding your hand, helping you get it done, guiding your every step," said Anderson, who had seven children from five different women. "But that NBA lifestyle isn't real. It can gobble you up. And it did me." Anderson was fired from his coaching job at a small Jewish high school in south Florida following his arrest in Pembroke Pines, Fla., at about 4:30 a.m. in late April 2013 after police allegedly saw him driving in and out of his lane. He also was arrested in Miranar, Fla., in mid-December 2011 after leaving the scene following crashing his vehicle into two trees along a swale. In a documentary (Mr. Chibbs), Anderson said he was sexually molested by a Queens neighbor during his childhood.

Carmelo Anthony, Syracuse (Jim Boeheim) - Arrested on suspicion of drunken driving at 4 a.m. in mid-April 2008 after one of his worst games of the season in Denver. He was suspended for 25 contests during the 2006-07 campaign for punching New York Knicks guard Mardy Collins in the face during one of the NBA's worst brawls. Took up the mantle of the "stop snitchin'" movement, appearing in an underground DVD circulated in his hometown of Baltimore in 2004 encouraging those who are questioned by the police to refuse to "snitch" on drug dealers, murderers and other criminals. Suspended for one game without pay midway through the 2012-13 campaign for confronting an opposing player (Boston's Kevin Garnett) multiple times (in the arena tunnel, near the players' locker rooms and in the parking garage) following a loss against the Celtics.

Ron Artest, St. John's (Fran Fraschilla and Mike Jarvis) - Authorities arrested him in early March 2007 after a woman called 911 from his five-acre Sacramento estate saying she had been assaulted. Deputies arrested him on suspicion of domestic violence and using force or violence to prevent his victim from reporting a crime. Five years earlier, he was ordered to attend anger management classes after another girlfriend (mother of one of his children) filed assault charges against him. His temper flared in 2003 at New York's Madison Square Garden when he smashed a video monitor valued at $100,000. He drew six suspensions in the 2002-03 season and two in the 2003-04 campaign. On November 19, 2004, at The Palace of Auburn Hills (Mich.), Artest went into the stands igniting a melee with the crowd and subsequently received the longest suspension in NBA history for an infraction not linked to drugs or gambling (86 games: 73 regular season and 13 postseason). All-Big East Conference first-team selection as a sophomore in 1998-99 changed his name to Metta World Peace in mid-September 2011.

Charles Barkley, Auburn (Sonny Smith) - Arrested for breaking a man's nose during a fight at 2:30 A.M. just before Christmas in 1991 after a game at Milwaukee and also for throwing a bar patron through a plate-glass window in late October 1997 after being struck with a glass of ice while in Orlando for an exhibition game. In August 1997, a jury rejected a $550,000 lawsuit from a man who claimed Barkley beat him up at a Cleveland nightclub. Charges were dropped against Barkley and fellow NBA player Jayson Williams stemming from an accusation they were in a bar fight in Chicago in 1992. Compulsive gambler said in an ESPN interview in May 2006 that he lost approximately $10 million through gambling, including $2.5 million "in a six-hour period" while playing blackjack. The Wynn Las Vegas resort filed a civil complaint in May 2008 that Barkley failed to repay four $100,000 casino markers, or loans, received the previous October. He took a leave of absence from TNT Sports' broadcast booth in early 2009 after test results showed he was legally drunk (nearly twice the legal limit) on New Year's Eve when Phoenix police arrested him on suspicion of drunken driving. Barkley, who triggered a national debate with his "I am not a role model" proclamation, told police he was in a hurry to go have sex from a female passenger he had just picked up from a popular nightclub.

Marvin Barnes, Providence (Dave Gavitt) - Unanimous first-team All-American in 1973-74 was arrested for a variety of things - trespassing, being under the influence of narcotics, burglary of a locked vehicle. Homeless in San Diego, he stole X-rated videos to sell for drug money. He claimed his cocaine addiction escalated to the point where he snorted the drug on the Boston Celtics' bench during a game. Barnes contends he hit rock bottom during one of his drug-related prison stints when he almost killed a fellow inmate. Barnes attended the John Lucas Treatment Center in Houston and worked as a director at a halfway house before encountering liver problems. In mid-May 2007, he was arrested by state police on a felony charge of cocaine possession. In mid-January 2012, Barnes, 59, was arraigned in Rhode Island on a charge of soliciting a 17-year-old minor for sex after they met through his Rebound Foundation for at-risk youths. In 1972, he was charged with assault after allegedly hitting PC teammate Larry Ketvirtis with a tire iron following a scrimmage. Barnes once asked Providence Journal columnist Bill Reynolds if cocaine kills brain cells before saying: "I must have been a genius when I started out." While incarcerated, Barnes also told Reynolds: "Here I am trying to get myself straightened out and they come out with a brand-new drug (crystal meth)."

Michael Beasley, Kansas State (Frank Martin) - In the first week of August 2013, the 2007-08 first-team All-American had his fourth public run-in involving marijuana in some capacity since entering the NBA. As a rookie with the Miami Heat in 2008 before being considered expendable when the franchise cleared cap room to pursue LeBron James, he was fined $50,000 by the NBA after acknowledging he was involved in an incident involving a couple of other players at a rookie symposium in New York (they were found in a room at the resort with two women - violating NBA policy for the event - and security personnel said the scent of marijuana was detected). Checked himself into a Houston rehab center in the summer of 2009 after there was a photo of Beasley with a bag of what was assumed as pot on a table in front of him that made its way around the internet. Arrested in late-January 2013 in Scottsdale, Ariz., for multiple traffic violations (including driving on a suspended license and speeding), Beasley was investigated for an alleged sexual assault committed earlier that month. His AAU coach, Curtis Malone, was arrested in mid-August 2013 and charged with conspiracy to distribute heroin two decades after he was convicted for distributing crack cocaine in 1991. Malone is the step-father of former Duke All-American Nolan Smith.

William Bedford, Memphis State (Dana Kirk) - All-American as a junior in 1985-86 was arrested in February 2001 after Taylor, Mich., police said they found 25 pounds of marijuana in his car. Subsequently served time in a Fort Worth, Tex., prison on drug-related charges. In 1987, he was subpoenaed by a Maricopa County (Ariz.) grand jury investigating drug use among Phoenix Suns players and testified against his teammates after receiving immunity. In March 1988, Bedford admitted he was addicted to cocaine and marijuana and was committed to the NBA's treatment facility in Van Nuys, Calif. Known as "Willie B" - as in "Will he be at practice?" - Bedford relapsed the following October and was readmitted to the clinic. When he returned, his behavior on and off the court grew more erratic. He received a dozen traffic tickets and 10 license suspensions in less than four years. In September 1997, Bedford, who was on three years probation at the time, tested positive for cocaine and was sent to a Texas state jail for one year. Also arrested in Texas for failing to pay more than $300,000 in child support.

Ron Behagen, Minnesota (Bill Musselman) - All-American as a senior in 1972-73 was sentenced to three years probation and ordered to pay restitution after pleading guilty to stealing money from a 68-year-old Atlanta woman suffering from Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and dementia. Behagen, receiving the woman's ATM card from her caretaker, withdrew $7,140 from the woman's bank account in 40 transactions the spring of 2011 with all of the them recorded on surveillance cameras.

Benoit Benjamin, Creighton (Willis Reed) - Arrested in hometown of Monroe, La., in spring of 2008 and charged with simple battery and resisting arrest following a domestic disturbance at his house. Big Ben was also reportedly ordered by a local judge to pay more than $500,000 in back child support. In 1993, domestic violence charges against Benjamin were dropped because prosecutors were unable to contact the alleged victim. Arrested three times for marijuana possession from 2009 to 2015. Also arrested for speeding in May of 1986 after purchasing a maroon BMW sedan.

Len Bias, Maryland (Lefty Driesell) - It was one of those moments when time seemed to stand still. The fallout stemming from the All-American forward's cocaine-induced death just four days after the 1986 NBA draft included the ouster of long-time Terrapins coach Lefty Driesell. Bias had become the only individual named ACC player of the year although his team had a losing league record (6-8 mark to finish in sixth place). Four and half years later, Bias' younger brother, Jay, a former Allegany Community College (Md.) forward after failing to measure up to DI scholarship academic standards, was shot and killed in the parking lot following an argument at a jewelry store in a local mall.

Daron "Mookie" Blaylock, Oklahoma (Billy Tubbs) - Busted in 1997 when drug sniffing dogs uncovered marijuana on him in a Vancouver, Canada airport. Second-team All-American was arrested around 4 a.m. in early March 1989 and charged with public drunkenness following a report of an argument at a convenience store. He was charged with vehicular homicide arising from a head-on crash killing a mother of five in suburban Atlanta in late May 2013. Blaylock, accused of driving on a suspended license and failure to maintain his lane in the crash, was also wanted on charges of failure to appear in court, DUI and drug possession. Bond was set at $250,000 stemming from a criminal record including six DUIs in a six-year span from late 2007 to late 2013 (one when blood alcohol content was 4 1/2 times legal limit) before he pleaded guilty (term reduced to seven years - suspended after three - and eight years' probation according to a plea deal). Prior to the crash, a doctor had ordered Blaylock (treated for seizures) not to drive, prosecutors said. A former Hawks ball-boy told SI that Blaylock was stoned a large part of the time he played for Atlanta after spending many game days at a strip club.

Dick Boushka, St. Louis (Eddie Hickey) - The 1956 Olympian rose to chief executive of the Vickers oil company and eventually got into real estate development. But in December 2002, the Billikens' All-American in 1954-55 pleaded guilty in federal court in Wichita, Kan., to defrauding a bank of more than $17 million. Boushka, sentenced to 70 months in prison for his white-collar crimes, admitted that he made false statements inducing the bank to make several large loans to him in 1998. He also admitted cheating another businessman out of $1.5 million.

Luther "Ticky" Burden, Utah (Bill Foster and Jerry Pimm) - Sentenced in August 1984 to the two years he already served in an update New York prison stemming from his involvement in a bank robbery of $18,000 in Hempstead, N.Y., in 1980 just five blocks from his house. Originally sentenced to six to 18 years after three associates struck deals with the state and testified against him. But he was released when a court ruled that police didn't have a search warrant when they raided his home. Upon release, he bounced back by promoting concerts and overseeing his own financial consulting company. Longtime counselor at a YWCA near his Winston-Salem, N.C., home. Burden was an All-American as a junior in 1974-75 before leaving college early for the pros.

Howard Carter, Louisiana State (Dale Brown) - Charged in the spring of 1995 with buying and using drugs after French police arrested him and seized a dose of heroin. He was arrested with five suspected drug dealers in the stairwell of a building shortly before his team was slated to play. Carter, a two-time All-American who averaged 15.2 ppg and 4.4 rpg for LSU from 1979-80 through 1982-83 and appeared in the 1981 Final Four, took out French citizenship and played for the country's national team.

Rex Chapman, Kentucky (Eddie Sutton) - Arrested in September 2014 for allegedly shoplifting $14,000 worth of merchandise a total of nine times from an Apple store and then selling the items at a pawnshop for $5,460. Ten days following his arrest, Chapman checked himself into a substance-abuse treatment program in Louisville reportedly trying to break an addiction to a drug that helps wean people off opiates. It was his third stint in rehab since retiring as a player.

Derrick Chievous, Missouri (Norm Stewart) - All-American as a junior in 1986-87 was charged with felony stealing in May, 2001, for allegedly taking items from the United Parcel Service terminal in Columbia, Mo., where he had worked for nine months after playing in the NBA and Europe. Chievous, who had been under investigation for months regarding possible theft, allegedly fled from managers while carrying stolen items. In 1997, he was arrested for failure to pay child support. "I'm not the marrying type," said Chievous, who had daughters in his college town plus Philadelphia and Chicago. "I'm not always the greatest dad. But I'm the best dad they've got."

Mateen Cleaves, Michigan State (Tom Izzo) - Two-time Big Ten Conference MVP and 2000 Final Four MOP arrested in mid-March 2010 on suspicion of drunken driving but ended up leading to careless driving. Sexual assault charges dismissed in 2016 after he was charged with false imprisonment by woman who said she was driven to a motel and attacked following a Flint-area charity golf outing and trip to local bar for drinks. Faced misdemeanor charges of stealing beer while in college but that case eventually was dropped.

Derrick Coleman, Syracuse (Jim Boeheim) - The Big East Conference's 1990 MVP was stopped in Farmington Hills, Mich., at 3:30 a.m. in late July 2002 for speeding (120 mph in a 70 mph zone) and taken into custody after refusing a breathalyzer test. Arrested in late October 1999 in Charlotte for driving while under the influence after the vehicle he was driving collided with a tractor-trailer. A couple of months earlier, he was accused of urinating in front of patrons at a downtown Detroit Chinese restaurant and charged with disorderly conduct. Coleman also faced a civil lawsuit in Michigan in which he was accused of trespassing and battery at a Detroit woman's home in 1997. In summer of 1995, he was arrested and charged with refusing to move his truck and swearing at a police officer in Detroit. Despite earning an estimated $87 million in his NBA career, he owed creditors $4.7 million after a series of poor real estate investments in Detroit. In college, Coleman was sentenced to 50 hours of community service and ordered to make restitution for damage after pleading guilty to charges of harassment and disorderly conduct at a campus dance.

Quintin Dailey, San Francisco (Dan Belluomini and Pete Barry) - All-American season in 1981-82 was marred by him pleading guilty to aggravated assault of a nursing student in a dormitory (sentenced to three years' probation and paid settlement of $100,000). A document in the case revealed that the two-time WCC Player of the Year accepted $1,000 per month from USF boosters for a summer job the Baltimore native did not have to do, sparking the termination of the school's basketball program for three seasons. Dailey gained 30 pounds in a single NBA season, twice violated the league's drug policy, attempted suicide and took leaves of absence for psychiatric care. "I had to learn life by trial and error as I went along. I erred a lot," Dailey told the Los Angeles Times before dying in Las Vegas at the age of 49 because of a heart ailment.

Walt "Corky" Devlin, George Washington (Bill Reinhart) - Compulsive gambler, married to a regular singer on the Arthur Godfrey Show, consistently stole money from his family and was penniless when migrating to a Trappist monastery in Kentucky. His addiction is depicted in a book about him called "In Search of Corky." All-American in 1954-55 was jailed in California after acting as a strikebreaker for a union. Treated for mental depression, he made an appearance on the Phil Donahue Show about Gambler's Anonymous. Said Devlin: "When I gamble, it's like play money. It doesn't matter if I win or lose. The thrill is there either way."

Raymond Felton, North Carolina (Roy Williams) - All-American in 2004-05 was sentenced to 500 hours of community service and ordered to pay a $5,000 fine after pleading guilty to attempted criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a firearm. He admitted knowingly having a large-capacity ammunition magazine and a pistol without a license in his Manhattan apartment. The attorney for his estranged wife turned a semiautomatic firearm into police in late February 2014 after alleging Felton used gun to "intimidate" her during domestic disputes.

Marcus Fizer, Iowa State (Tim Floyd) - NCAA consensus first-team All-American in 1999-00 pleaded guilty in August 2004 to carrying a loaded handgun in his automobile and was sentenced to probation for a year and fined $2,500. Two years earlier, Fizer was also charged with a felony count of aggravated unlawful use of a weapon. He was one of the most-heavily tattooed players in the NBA with more than 30.

Chet Forte, Columbia (Lou Rossini) - ABC Sports' top director was humbled by a gambling sickness that left him $1.5 million in debt and with legal problems that almost sent him to prison. In March 1992, he was given five years' probation, ordered to perform 400 hours of community service, make restitution of past debts and pay $39,000 in back federal taxes. Forte was named UPI's national player of the year in 1956-57.

Joe Forte, North Carolina (Bill Guthridge and Matt Doherty) - Maryland state police arrested him in early May, 2003, after finding marijuana and a handgun in his car on a trip back from New York, where he met his idol, rapper Jay-Z. Two-time All-ACC guard (1999-00 and 2000-01) also faced an assault charge when he allegedly punched a man in the face during a pickup game. Questions linger about his mother being hired by the sports agency he subsequently affiliated with upon leaving school early.

Steve Francis, Maryland (Gary Williams) - J.C. recruit and All-American in 1998-99 was taken into custody in early October 2010 at Los Angeles International Airport for resisting arrest. He appeared intoxicated and was creating a stir at a ticket counter. Five months earlier, a 20-year-old woman on his record label filed a groping complaint against him. In mid-November 2016, Francis was arrested in Houston and charged with felony retaliation for allegedly threatening a police officer, misdemeanor DWI plus possession of marijuana after he was stopped for speeding.

Ben Gordon, Connecticut (Jim Calhoun) - Arrested during 2002-03 season for allegedly slapping a female student. Fiancee Sascha Smith was involved in an early-morning brawl at a Charlotte nightclub in mid-December 2012 that landed Tyrus Thomas' wife in jail. Four run-ins with the law in six-month span in 2017 (arrested in early June after allegedly pulling multiple fire alarms at his L.A. apartment complex, hospitalized for a psych evaluation in his hometown of Mount Vernon, N.Y., in October after cops responded to a confrontation he had with a woman at his sports rehab center-owned business, arrested in mid-November in New York City for driving with forged license plate and arrested in late November for felony robbery of apartment manager over his security deposit).

Joe Hobbs, Florida (John Mauer) - All-American guard as a senior in 1957-58 was sentenced to 22 1/2 years in prison in mid-June 1988. Indiana native was convicted of more than two dozen counts of grand theft stemming from insurance fraud, violating his probation and then escaping from a prison work-release center.

Byron Houston, Oklahoma State (Leonard Hamilton and Eddie Sutton) - The Cowboys' all-time leading scorer (2,374 points from 1988-89 through 1991-92) pleaded guilty to multiple counts of indecent exposure in 2003 and became a registered sex offender. In mid-September, 2007, he was sentenced to four years in prison for violating probation on an indecent exposure conviction in his hometown of Oklahoma City. Defense witnesses said Houston suffered from bipolar disorder and other mental illnesses. Charged with one count of cruelty to animals in the summer of 2011.

Allen Iverson, Georgetown (John Thompson Jr.) - In the summer of 2002, he was charged with assault and other offenses for forcing his way into a Philadelphia apartment with a gun and threatening two men while looking for his wife. He was also sued for his part in a nightclub brawl in Washington in 2005. Iverson's wife, Tawanna, filed for divorce in early March 2010, a week after AI, beset by alcohol and gambling issues, left the 76ers. A judge used the signing of a $3 million divorce decree settlement as a moment to let Iverson know he felt his role as a father to the couple's five children was deplorable and suggested he was an alcoholic. He had been banished from casinos in Detroit and Atlantic City. NBA Rookie of the Year was arrested in the summer of 1997 for possession of a handgun and marijuana near Richmond, Va. As a teenager, he was arrested in a Hampton, Va., bowling alley brawl in 1993 and spent four months in prison before then-Gov. Douglas Wilder granted clemency, allowing him to enroll at Georgetown, where he became a first-team All-American as a sophomore in 1995-96. His defacto father spent a good portion of his adult life in and out of prison for dealing crack cocaine. Iverson, a rapper wannabee, performed a song on his CD containing the following words: "Man enough to pull a gun, be man enough to squeeze it." After squandering more than $150 million in NBA salary, Iverson was ordered by a judge in Georgia in mid-February 2012 to pay $860,000 he apparently owed a jeweler. Since Iverson didn't have the cash to pay the jeweler, the judge ordered his bank accounts commandeered and his earnings garnished. Iverson's Atlanta mansion was sold in a foreclosure auction in early February 2013. A Sixers teammate said Iverson routinely spent $30-40G at strip clubs.

Lewis Lloyd, Drake (Bob Ortegel) - Beset by cocaine problems triggering a ban from the NBA in 1987. The previous year, the Stouffer Hotel Corporation sued him for an unpaid bill of more than $49,000 that had been charged to his room during a stay at one of its Houston hotels. He also was arrested in the spring of 1990 for nonpayment of child support.

Kevin Loder, Alabama State (James Oliver) - All-American in 1980-81 was sentenced to 10 years in prison in 1994 for dealing cocaine. "The addiction undermined anything I tried to do," he said.

Cliff Meely, Colorado (Sox Walseth) - All-American in 1970-71 was charged in Boulder, Colo., in 1985 with possession of cocaine and two counts of selling the drug to an undercover officer. "I tried to distract myself from problems by using drugs and becoming an addict," Meely said. "After getting caught, they gave me treatment, classes, specialists, etc. My doctors taught me about the harm of drugs, and they were able to get me off cocaine and get me going in the right direction."

Dean Meminger, Marquette (Al McGuire) - Unanimous first-team All-American as a senior in 1970-71, who said his cocaine use escalated after leaving the NBA, worked as a substance-abuse counselor for several years while still using cocaine. He was treated at the Hazelden facility in Minnesota and had several relapses in the 1990s, ending up in a brownstone for transients in Harlem. In late November 2009, Meminger was hospitalized after a fire reportedly started by a crack pipe in a Bronx rooming house before he was found dead in a Hamilton Heights hotel of an apparent drug overdose in late August 2013. In a 2003 interview, he said his longest drug-free stint as an adult was three years.

Ron Mercer, Kentucky (Rick Pitino) - Faced misdemeanor assault charge stemming from a scuffle in a Nashville strip club in April 2007. Police said Mercer punched a bouncer in the face. In January 2000, he was sued along with Chauncey Billups and Antoine Walker for attempted rape in a case settled out of court. In August 2013, a jury sided with him in a lawsuit brought by an ex-girlfriend over the ownership of a $45,000 Range Rover.

Lee Nailon, Texas Christian (Billy Tubbs) - Charges were dropped during the summer of 1999 after the All-American was arrested for suspicion of drug possession and evading arrest. Midway through the 2005-06 NBA season, Nailon was arrested outside Philadelphia for apparently beating his wife.

Greg Oden, Ohio State (Thad Matta) - All-American center as freshman in 2006-07 was formally charged with battery for allegedly punching his ex-girlfriend in the face around 3:30 a.m. on August 7, 2014, at his mother's home in Lawrence, Ind. In a plea agreement, he was found guilty of felony battery with moderate bodily injury.

Gary Payton, Oregon State (Ralph Miller and Jim Anderson) - Arrested in Los Angeles in August 2004 for investigation of driving under the influence after being stopped by police backing down an entrance ramp on the freeway. NCAA unanimous first-team All-American in 1990 was charged with assault stemming from a fight outside a Toronto club in April 2003.

Anthony Peeler, Missouri (Norm Stewart) - In 1998, a federal court jury in St. Louis awarded a woman $300,000 in damages and $2.1 million in punitive damages after she sued him and testified that he pinned her down and held a gun to her head. Just before the 1992 NBA draft, the Big Eight Conference player of the year had an assault charge dropped against him in Kansas City. Peeler, placed on five years' probation in Columbia, Mo., the previous week in connection with another assault charge, had been accused of punching a woman in the face and wrestling her to the ground.

Chuck Person, Auburn (Sonny Smith) - The Tigers' all-time leading scorer was fired as associate head coach in fall of 2017 after he was indicted on six federal charges for bribery, fraud and conspiracy following his arrest by the FBI.

Chris Porter, Auburn (Cliff Ellis) - SEC Player of the Year in 1998-99 when he was the leading scorer and rebounder for the Tigers' all-time winningest team faced a warrant in late September 2010 stemming from a probation violation after he was charged with driving under the influence. Porter pleaded guilty concurrently to a misdemeanor marijuana charge but the jail time (one year) was suspended as part of a plea agreement. He had been charged in April, 2006, with driving under the influence and second-degree possession of marijuana. In August 2001, he was also arrested in Alabama and charged with second-degree possession of marijuana and unlawful possession of a controlled substance. Porter was suspended during his senior season for accepting $2,500 from a sports agent. "You make bad decisions," Porter said. "That's life. We all make decisions that we have to live with, and I've made some bad decisions."

Howard Porter, Villanova (Jack Kraft) - Final Four Most Outstanding Player in 1971 served six months in jail for probation violation on a previous drug conviction. "I was a junkie like any other junkie," Porter told the Tampa Tribune. He was trying to trade money and crack cocaine for sex with a prostitute in St. Paul in May, 2007, when the probation officer was beaten to death, according to murder charges filed several months later.

J.R. Rider, UNLV (Jerry Tarkanian and Rollie Massimino) - In the fall of 2011 he was arrested on a parole violation in Arizona stemming from an incident the previous year when he fled police after they attempted to stop him from driving erratically. His chronic legal problems included an arrest at 5 a.m. in July, 2006, for felony cocaine possession at a home in the Oakland area. Bail was set at $2 million in six months earlier in Marin County (Calif.) following his arrest for kidnapping and battery of a female acquaintance. Rider also faced an outstanding warrant for resisting arrest in Alameda County. In May 1997, he was convicted of marijuana possession and later pleaded no contest to possessing unregistered cellular phones. There had been questions whether Rider, an All-American in 1992-93, did all the work in an English summer correspondence course allowing him to maintain his eligibility for Massimino's first season with the Rebels.

Anthony Roberts, Oral Roberts (Jerry Hale) - After a drug problem shortened his NBA career, he died at the age of 41 in March 1997 when a 19-year-old apartment complex neighbor in Tulsa shot the 1976-77 All-American in the back during a heated argument.

Alvin Robertson, Arkansas (Eddie Sutton) - All-SWC first-team selection in 1983-84 was sentenced to a year in jail in August, 1997, after pleading no contest to four misdemeanor charges stemming from confrontations with his ex-girlfriend. He previously agreed to undergo therapy for spousal abuse. Robertson was sentenced to three years in prison in 2002 for a probation violation involving a rape accusation. In San Antonio in late February 2010, Robertson faced sexual assault of a child and sex trafficking charges alleging he was among seven people who kidnapped a 14-year-old girl who was forced into prostitution and made to dance at a strip club. In mid-June 2014, he was arrested on a charge of violating terms of a bond involving his GPS ankle monitor. Seven months later, he was apprehended after being on the run for a week upon reportedly cutting off his GPS monitor. In late March 2015, court documents revealed he had accumulated 10 bond violations, including testing positive for methamphetamine.

Glenn Robinson Jr., Purdue (Gene Keady) - On May 15, 2003, a Cook County (Ill.) jury found the 1993-94 Big Ten Conference MVP guilty of domestic battery and assault after police charged him with attacking his former girlfriend and threatening to shoot her. In the summer of 1999, Robinson was arrested for disorderly intoxication after being denied entrance to a nightclub.

Rumeal Robinson, Michigan (Bill Frieder/Steve Fisher) - Best remembered for converting the game-winning free throws in the 1989 NCAA title game against Seton Hall, he was sentenced in early 2011 to 6 1/2 years in jail for financial fraud. The charges against Robinson were bank bribery, wire fraud, conspiracy to commit bank fraud and making a false statement to a financial institution. The two-time All-Big Ten Conference selection borrowed more than $700,000 from a bank in Iowa in 2004, claiming it was for a business. He used the money for personal purposes instead (buying a condominium, cars, furniture and investing in an energy company). He's a bankrupted "strip club addict," according to his adoptive brother. Sparked outrage in his Cambridge, Mass., hometown when he reportedly caused his adoptive mother to be forcibly removed from her home after being tricked into signing a deed that sold a house to Robinson's business associate while receiving no money.

Marshall Rogers, Kansas (Ted Owens)/Pan American (Abe Lemons) - The nation's leading scorer in 1975-76 with Pan American was arrested in his hometown of St. Louis in late June 1987 and charged with assault and petty theft in connection with a shoplifting incident (bottle of Mennen Skin Bracer, stick deodorant, a pair of white sunglasses and three Baby Ruth candy bars worth a total of $13) at a downtown Walgreen's drug store. Police said Rogers fought with two store managers, a security guard and three police officers before he was subdued after being struck in the head three times with a nightstick. Rogers, who was living with his mother and told arresting officers he had been out of work the previous three years, was confronted by store personnel and allegedly told them: "Here, you can have the Skin Bracer but that's all." After his diabetes worsened, he had both of his legs amputated below the knees before being checked into a nursing home in 2006. Rogers, who frequently clutched scrapbooks he kept of his playing exploits, died in mid-June 2011 at the age of 57 after refusing to undergo the kidney dialysis treatment doctors said he needed.

Curtis Rowe, UCLA (John Wooden) - Two-time All-American while playing for three straight NCAA champions from 1969 through 1971 was charged in mid-October 1989 with possession of cocaine after Detroit police said they saw him and a companion throw packets of drugs on the ground. Arrested in late February 2008 in a drug raid in a building on Detroit's west side as officers found him with a baggie containing a substance believed to be heroin on his person.

Clifford Rozier, North Carolina (Dean Smith)/Louisville (Denny Crum) - After years of personal and legal trouble (five arrests and bankruptcy), the 1994 first-team All-American was incarcerated in his hometown of Bradenton, Fla., in May 2001, after being charged with grand theft auto. Rozier, jailed after an accusation of stealing a Manatee County sheriff deputy's personal car, was on the run for about a month before police apprehended him in Orlando. His ex-wife had him committed various times to a psychiatric care facility under Florida's Baker Act. Drug panhandler had three vehicles repossessed and his liabilities included child support to three women. After spending time in jail cells and psychiatric wards, Rozier lived in a halfway house following a 2006 arrest on an assault charge. Arrested in summer of 1998 on charges of assaulting his mother but the case was dropped.

Ralph Sampson, Virginia (Terry Holland) - Three-time national player of the year from 1981 through 1983 was accused of lying to federal authorities about his finances in a child support case. Sampson pleaded guilty in 2005 in Richmond to failing to pay about $300,000 in court-ordered child support for two children who live in northern Virginia and have different mothers. Sentencing was postponed after he was indicted on perjury and false claim charges before mail fraud and false statement allegations were added.

Ralph Simpson, Michigan State (Gus Ganakas) - All-American in his only season with the Spartans in 1969-70 was sentenced to 10 years probation in June 1989 after pleading guilty to defrauding a creditor in Aurora, Colo. Operating a credit-counseling business helping people with poor credit ratings finance new cars, he was accused of arranging for people to buy cars by using false credit information on loan applications.

Charles E. Smith, Georgetown (John Thompson Jr.) - Big East Conference MVP in 1988-89 served 29 months of a 4 1/2-year prison sentence for vehicular homicide. Smith, involved in a late-night hit-and-run accident, was driving a rented van that struck and killed two Boston University female students on a busy city street. An assistant district attorney argued in court Smith had been drinking, and an eyewitness testified he ran a red light. In October 2010, he was found shot in the upper body in Bowie, Md., in a house where a significant amount of cocaine and evidence of a gambling operation were found. Smith had been a part-time bartender at a sports bar. The shooting reportedly stemmed from a gambling debt.

Rod Strickland, DePaul (Joey Meyer) - D.C. police charged him with driving while under the influence and reckless driving in April, 1999, after the 1987-88 All-American drove his gold Mercedes Benz through three red lights. Four years earlier, he was arrested in New York and charged with hitting his former girlfriend. In late October 2000, he was charged with refusing to leave a restaurant that was being closed by fire marshals in Washington. Strickland was a Kentucky assistant coach in the spring of 2010 when he was arrested around 3 a.m. for DUI, running a red light, having expired tags and insurance violations after failing a sobriety test. A couple of years later, he was arrested near UK's campus and charged with driving on a DUI suspended license.

Stromile Swift, Louisiana State (John Brady) - All-American in 1999-00 was arrested in Shreveport in mid-May 2011 for stalking the same woman he allegedly threatened three months earlier by sending menacing text messages and then showing up at her home with a gun.

Roy Tarpley, Michigan (Bill Frieder) - All-American in 1984-85 and 1985-86 was charged in Denton County (Tex.) in May 1998 with assault and failure to appear in court. The charges stemmed from an alleged attack on a woman. Days after being released from jail in April, 2003, in the wake of serving more than a month for a probation violation, he filed for personal bankruptcy. Tarpley played for the Dallas Mavericks from 1986 until he was thrown out of the NBA in October 1991 for using cocaine, a violation of the league's substance-abuse policy. Leslie Rockymore, a former UM teammate, claimed Tarpley failed drug tests in college but was given a free pass.

Isiah Thomas, Indiana (Bob Knight) - A Detroit TV reporter filed an assault and battery complaint against Thomas during his playing days with the Pistons, claiming Thomas choked him and threw him against a car. A jury decided in the fall of 2007 that Thomas sexually harassed a former Knicks team executive, subjecting the former Northwestern basketball player to unwanted advances and a barrage of vulgarity (Madison Square Garden eventually settled for $11.5 million). The CBA almost disbanded after Thomas purchased the minor league before selling his interest in 2000. Multiple CBA executives said Thomas was "rude. . . . very poor business person. . . . doesn't listen to people. . . . makes poor decisions."

David Thompson, North Carolina State (Norm Sloan) - National player of the year in 1973-74 and 1974-75 had well-publicized involvement with cocaine. He was accused of assaulting his wife, filed for bankruptcy and suffered a knee injury in a dispute at Studio 54 in New York.

Bernard Toone, Marquette (Al McGuire and Hank Raymonds) - All-American in 1978-79 was charged with attempted grand larceny, criminal possession of burglar's tools and criminal mischief in April 1988 in White Plains, N.Y., after allegedly attempting to steal a car stereo system from a new Porsche. Toone had been arrested twice in less than a year in 1985--charged with third-degree grand larceny for allegedly stealing a car radio and pleading guilty to unauthorized use of a motor vehicle after he was arrested at a fast-food restaurant in a rental car that had been reported stolen.

Robert "Tractor" Traylor, Michigan (Steve Fisher) - All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection in 1997-98 was sentenced to three years of probation after pleading guilty in federal court in Detroit in January 2007 to a federal income tax charge, the result of receiving and concealing stolen property while hiding assets for a convicted drug dealer (Traylor's cousin Quasand Lewis). He was also accused of laundering $4 million of drug money for the same cousin who sold an estimated $178 million in illegal drugs in Metro Detroit and had associates with suspected links to nearly a dozen murders plus four fire-bombed homes, according to federal authorities. Prior to connection with his coarse cousin, Traylor was part of a scandal causing the NCAA to nail his alma mater. Traylor admitted that, as a high school and college player, he and his family accepted some $160,000 in cash and gifts from a local hoops junkie who ran an illegal lottery at area Ford plants. In May 2011, Traylor was found dead in his apartment at the age of 34 in Puerto Rico, where he was playing professionally.

Jimmy Walker, Providence (Joe Mullaney) - First-team All-American in 1965-66 and 1966-67 was sentenced in April 1983 to 90 days in prison, three years of probation and 250 hours of community service on charges of failing to file federal income tax returns in 1976 and 1977. In college, he pleaded guilty to two paternity suits and was sentenced to six years probation.

Kermit Washington, American (Tom Young) - One of six players averaging more than 20 ppg and 20 rpg in his major-college career (20.1 ppg/20.2 rpg from 1970-71 through 1972-73) pleaded guilty to three felonies and faced up to eight years in prison and fine up to $750,000. Originally, the AU All-American as a senior faced up to 40 years in prison and $1 million in fines if convicted of charges brought against him in spring of 2016 by a federal grand jury that he orchestrated scheme evading taxes and defrauding donors to his charities under the pretense of helping the needy in Africa. Washington's NBA career was irreparably damaged after nearly killing Rudy Tomjanovich with a punch during a game in 1977.

Chris Webber, Michigan (Steve Fisher) - Charged with marijuana possession and assaulting a police officer in 1998. He was pulled over and resisted the officer. The vehicle was impounded and traces of marijuana were found inside. Also that year, he was arrested by customs officials for possession of marijuana as he returned from a promotional trip to Puerto Rico. Indicted by a federal grand jury in Detroit in September, 2002, on four felony counts of conspiracy to obstruct justice and lying to federal investigators (regarding money laundering tied to a shady UM booster, a bookmaker who was convicted of tax evasion and robbery before dying of a heart attack before he testified against Webber, who subsequently pleaded guilty to one count of criminal intent for lying about his role in the scandal). Suspended in mid-February, 2004, for five games by the NBA for violating the league's anti-drug program. Sued over the closing of his Sacramento restaurant after signing a 20-year lease in 2005.

Bonzi Wells, Ball State (Ray McCallum) - He and Portland Trail Blazers teammate Erick Barkley cited for criminal trespass in 2001 after refusing to follow the order of an officer to leave the scene of a fight near a downtown nightclub. Suspended for one game without pay in November 2002 for spitting on an opposing player (the Spurs' Danny Ferry). Wells told SI: "We're (the Jail Blazers) not really going to worry about what the hell (the fans) think about us." Suspended two games for publicly cursing at his coach, suspended one game without pay for fined $10,000 for intentionally striking an official during a game and was noted for making obscene gestures to the crowd when things didn't go well. A judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by a Muncie, Ind., man and his mother in spring of 2013 including charges of damaging the front door of their home, threatening them and later battering the man.

Delonte West, Temple (John Chaney) - All-American guard in 2003-04 was suspended for the first 10 games of the 2010-11 NBA season after pleading guilty to weapons charges in Maryland. Authorities said he was carrying two loaded handguns, a loaded shotgun and an 8 1/2-inch Bowie knife while speeding on a three-wheel motorcycle (complete with sidecar) on the Capital Beltway the previous September. Battling bipolar disorder, he received home detention, probation and community service. His wife filed a domestic violence against him in the fall of 2009 and he was spotted loitering around a fast-food parking lot in a hospital robe without his shoes in Houston in mid-February 2016.

Charles "Hawkeye" Whitney, North Carolina State (Norman Sloan) - Drug abuser was sentenced in June 1996 to 69 months in prison for the armed kidnapping of former White House lawyer Mark Fabiani. "I'm a recovering (cocaine) addict, and I will be for the rest of my life," said Whitney, an All-American in 1979-80. "I'm just grateful I have this chance to get it right. A lot of people die on the streets."

Frank Williams, Illinois (Lon Kruger and Bill Self) - Big Ten Conference Player of the Year in 2000-01 was arrested with his younger brother (Aaron) in June 2009, after agents for a multi-county enforcement group executed a search warrant at a Peoria, Ill., home. Agents seized 78 grams of marijuana, a digital scale and a .40-caliber handgun. In a plea bargain, Frank was sentenced to two years of probation and a $1,000 fine. In July 2013, Williams was booked for domestic battery.

James "Fly" Williams, Austin Peay (Lake Kelly) - Brownsville, N.Y., product served two years on a drug possession rap in the mid-1990s after spending 14 months in Attica and two other prisons stemming from charges of attempted robbery, unlawful imprisonment, weapons possession and menacing. After a pickup game in Starrett City in 1987, the drug-ravaged 1972-73 All-American got in an argument with a friend over money and was shot by an off-duty court officer with a shotgun. In the spring of 2017, he was busted in "Operation Flying High" as the kingpin of a massive drug ring peddling two million vials of heroin worth estimated $12 million to $20 million in his former Brooklyn neighborhood.

Sylvester "Sly" Williams, Rhode Island (Jack Kraft) - All-American in 1977-78 and 1978-79 faced felony charges of first-degree rape, first-degree sodomy and first-degree kidnapping in connection with an incident in September 2001 in Endicott, N.Y. Prosecutors accused him of having sex with a 42-year-old woman against her will at her home. Williams was working for a pipe and plastics company at the time of his arrest. Previously, he received a suspended prison sentence in 1991 in New Haven, Conn., on abuse charges filed by his girlfriend.

Terrence Williams, Louisville (Rick Pitino) - Third-team All-American in 2008-09 was arrested in his hometown of Seattle on May 19, 2013, in a domestic violence case although the county prosecutors office chose not to file charges. As they were exchanging their 10-year-old son fathered when he was 15, Williams allegedly brandished a gun and made threats at the mother during an argument. Williams' 20-year old father was murdered when Williams was only six; a few days after he was released from prison. His young mother was also in jail at the time and appeared at the funeral in chains. Williams was placed on the inactive list by the New Jersey Nets during the 2010-11 season for repeated violations of team rules. He denied salacious allegations in an escort's book about UL, calling himself the "Elvis Presley" of The Ville and asked why he would need to pay anybody for dirty dancing or sex.

Lorenzen Wright, Memphis (Larry Finch) - His badly-decomposing body, indicating at least five shots from multiple shooters, was found in a secluded field near a golf course in southeast Memphis in late July 2010. A 911 operator took an emergency call from Wright's cell phone and believes he heard gunshots in the background. Wright was in arrears on his $26,000-a-month alimony and child-support payments for his six children. Court documents show Wright, an All-American in 1995-96 as a sophomore, acknowledged to the FBI in 2008 that he sold a Mercedes sedan and Cadillac SUV to an individual known by authorities to be part of a drug kingpin gang. Despite earning an estimated $55 million over his 13-year NBA career, Wright's $1.3 million home in Atlanta was repossessed along with a $2.7 million home near Memphis he owned. His ex-wife claimed in a book she wrote that she was trapped in an abusive marriage. But Sherra Wright-Robinson was arrested in California in mid-December 2017 in his death and charged with conspiracy, first-degree murder and criminal attempt first-degree murder along with deacon from her previous church. The case blossomed when an FBI dive team searched a lake in Walnut, Miss., and found a gun authorities said was used in the murder. In 2014, she agreed to a confidential settlement in a dispute over how she spent $1 million in insurance earmarked to benefit their children.

Bob "Zeke" Zawoluk, St. John's (Frank McGuire) - The All-American in 1950-51 and 1951-52 had a turbulent life including vast emotional instability, an arson rap, crack addiction, grand larceny conviction and prison. After getting fired by one of a series of auto dealers he worked for, he got even in an alcohol-fueled rage in Queens and Nassau County in 1986, dousing two luxury cars with gasoline, torching them, then ramming into 17 other cars, before being apprehended after a high-speed chase. Following another transgression, he was paroled on Christmas Eve, 1993, after serving nearly two years at Clinton Correctional Facility on robbery and grand larceny charges. A subsequent positive drug test violated his parole and sent him to Rikers Island in the mid-1990s.

Last of Unbeatens: Odds Against Sun Devils Winning NCAA Playoff Crown

No NCAA Division I men's team has compiled an undefeated record since Indiana in 1975-76. Arizona State was the last remaining unbeaten team this season until the Sun Devils bowed at Arizona in their 13th contest of the campaign.

The historical odds are against ASU winning the NCAA title because only three final undefeated teams in the previous 38 years - (Duke '92, UConn '99 and Florida '06) - went on to capture the national crown.

Prior to probation-shackled SMU two seasons ago, Clemson (winner of its first 17 outings in 2006-07), was the only school in this last-of-the-unbeaten category to fail to participate in the NCAA playoffs. The Tigers finished runner-up in the NIT.

It's the first time no NCAA DI team was undefeated entering the new year since national polling was introduced in the late 1940s. Following in reverse order are vital facts on final unbeaten teams since the Hoosiers a half-century ago:

Season Last Unbeaten (Wins) First Defeat Date Score Final Record/Postseason
2017-18 Arizona State (12) Arizona 12-31-17 84-78 To be determined
2016-17 Gonzaga (29)* Brigham Young 2-25-17 79-71 37-2/National Runner-up
2015-16 Southern Methodist (18) at Temple 1-24-16 89-80 25-5/Probation
2014-15 Kentucky (38)* vs. Wisconsin 4-4-15 71-64 38-1/NCAA Final Four
2013-14 Wichita State (35)* vs. Kentucky 3-23-14 78-76 35-1/Second Round
2012-13 Michigan (16) at Ohio State 1-13-13 56-53 31-8/NCAA Runner-up
2011-12 Murray State (23)* Tennessee State 2-9-12 72-68 31-2/Second Round
2010-11 Ohio State (24) at Wisconsin 2-12-11 71-67 34-3/Regional Semifinal
2009-10 Kentucky (19) at South Carolina 1-26-10 68-62 35-3/Regional Final
2008-09 Wake Forest (16) Virginia Tech 1-21-09 78-71 24-7/First Round
2007-08 Memphis (26) Tennessee 2-23-08 66-62 38-2/National Runner-up
2006-07 Clemson (17)* at Maryland 1-13-07 92-87 25-11/NIT Runner-up
2005-06 Florida (17)* at Tennessee 1-21-06 80-76 33-6/NCAA Champion
2004-05 Illinois (29)* at Ohio State 3-6-05 65-64 37-2/NCAA Runner-up
2003-04 Saint Joseph's (27)* vs. Xavier 3-11-04 87-67 30-2/Regional Final
2002-03 Duke (12) at Maryland 1-18-03 87-72 26-7/Regional Semifinal
2001-02 Duke (12) at Florida State 1-6-02 77-76 31-4/Regional Semifinal
2000-01 Stanford (20) UCLA 2-3-01 79-73 31-3/Regional Final
1999-00 Syracuse (19) Seton Hall 2-7-00 69-67 26-6/Regional Semifinal
1998-99 Connecticut (19) Syracuse 2-1-99 59-42 34-2/NCAA Champion
1997-98 Utah (18) at New Mexico 2-1-98 77-74 30-4/NCAA Runner-up
1996-97 Kansas (22) at Missouri (2OT) 2-4-97 96-94 34-2/Regional Semifinal
1995-96 Massachusetts (26)* George Washington 2-24-96 86-76 35-2/NCAA Final Four
1994-95 Connecticut (15) at Kansas 1-28-95 88-59 28-5/Regional Final
1993-94 UCLA (14) at California 1-30-94 85-70 21-7/First Round
1992-93 Virginia (11) at North Carolina 1-20-93 80-58 21-10/Regional Semifinal
1991-92 Duke (17) at North Carolina 2-5-92 75-73 34-2/NCAA Champion
1991-92 Oklahoma State (20) at Nebraska 2-5-92 85-69 28-8/Regional Semifinal
1990-91 UNLV (34) vs. Duke 3-30-91 79-77 34-1/NCAA Final Four
1989-90 Georgetown (14) at Connecticut 1-20-90 70-65 24-7/Second Round
1988-89 Illinois (17) at Minnesota 1-26-89 69-62 31-5/NCAA Final Four
1987-88 Brigham Young (17)* at UAB 2-6-88 102-83 26-6/Sweet 16
1986-87 DePaul (16) at Georgetown 1-25-87 74-71 28-3/Regional Semifinal
1985-86 Memphis State (20) at Virginia Tech 2-1-86 76-72 28-6/Second Round
1984-85 Georgetown (18) St. John's 1-26-85 66-65 35-3/NCAA Runner-up
1983-84 North Carolina (21) vs. Arkansas 2-12-84 65-64 28-3/Regional Semifinal
1982-83 UNLV (24) at Cal State Fullerton 2-24-83 86-78 28-3/Second Round
1981-82 Missouri (19) Nebraska 2-6-82 67-51 27-4/Regional Semifinal
1980-81 Oregon State (26)* Arizona State 3-7-81 87-67 26-2/Second Round
1979-80 DePaul (26)* at Notre Dame (2OT) 2-27-80 76-74 26-2/Second Round
1978-79 Indiana State (33)* vs. Michigan State 3-26-79 75-64 33-1/NCAA Runner-up
1977-78 Kentucky (14) at Alabama 1-23-78 78-62 30-2/NCAA Champion
1976-77 San Francisco (29) at Notre Dame 3-5-77 93-82 29-2/First Round

*All-time top winning streaks.
NOTES: North Carolina lost in Pine Bluff, Ark. . . . Saint Joseph's lost in Atlantic 10 Conference Tournament quarterfinals at Dayton.

On This Date: Former College Hoopers Ready for January Football

Long before kneeling knuckleheads such as GQ cover boy #ColonKrapernick, the NCAA Tournament commenced in 1939, which was one year after the NIT triggered national postseason competition. An overlooked "versatile athlete" feat occurring in 1938 likely never to be duplicated took place at Arkansas, where the quarterback for the football squad (Jack Robbins) repeated as an All-SWC first-team basketball selection, leading the Razorbacks (19-3) to the league title. After the season, Robbins became an NFL first-round draft choice by the Chicago Cardinals (5th pick overall) and senior football/basketball teammates Jim Benton (11th pick by Cleveland Rams) and Ray Hamilton (41st pick by Rams) went on to become wide receivers for at least six years in the NFL. Yes, they created a kneeling-in-admiration shatterproof achievement - three members of a league championship basketball squad who promptly were among the top 41 selections in the same NFL draft.

Two years later, All-SWC first-team hoop selection Howard "Red" Hickey was instrumental in Arkansas reaching the 1941 Final Four before becoming an end for the Cleveland Rams' 1945 NFL titlist. Two-sport college teammate and fellow end O'Neal Adams scored five touchdowns for the New York Giants the first half of the 1940s. Another two-sport Hog who played for the Giants in the mid-1940s was Harry Wynne. An earlier versatile Razorback was Jim Lee Howell, who was an All-SWC first five hoops selection in 1935-36 before becoming a starting end for the Giants' 1938 NFL titlist and Pro Bowl participant the next year. Adams, Benton, Hamilton, Hickey and Howell combined for 77 touchdowns in an 11-year span from 1938 through 1948 when at least one of the ex-Razorback hoopers scored a TD in each of those seasons.

Hickey and ex-Hog All-SWC second-team hooper in 1929-30/NFL end Milan Creighton each coached NFL franchises. Many other ex-college hoopers also displayed their wares on the gridiron. Following is exhaustive research you can tackle regarding former college basketball players who made a name for themselves in January football at the professional level:

JANUARY
1: Houston Oilers TE John Carson (Georgia hoops letterman in 1952 and 1953) had a 13-yard pass reception in 24-16 win against the Los Angeles Chargers in AFL championship contest following 1960 season. Oilers rookie WR Bill Groman (led Heidelberg OH in scoring average as sophomore and junior while averaging 14.6 ppg and 4.8 rpg from 1954-55 through 1957-58) caught a touchdown pass from George Blanda. . . . Kansas City Chiefs QB Len Dawson (Purdue hooper in 1956-57) threw two 29-yard first-half touchdown passes in a 31-7 win against the Buffalo Bills in 1967 AFL championship game. FL Otis Taylor (backup small forward for Prairie View A&M) provided the go-ahead TD catch from Dawson. . . . FL Elbert Dubenion (solid rebounder and defensive player for Bluffton OH in late 1950s) scored the Buffalo Bills' only touchdown with a 69-yard pass from Jack Kemp in 31-7 setback against the Kansas City Chiefs in AFL playoffs following 1966 season. . . . Arizona Cardinals TE Darren Fells (averaged 10.2 ppg and 6.3 rpg from 2004-05 through 2007-08, leading UCI in rebounding each of last three seasons) had a 37-yard touchdown reception in 44-6 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 2016 season finale. . . . Dallas Cowboys E Pete Gent (three-time All-Big Ten Conference selection averaged 17.4 ppg and 8.3 rpg in leading Michigan State in scoring each season from 1961-62 through 1963-64) caught three passes for 28 yards in a 34-27 playoff setback against the Green Bay Packers following 1966 season. Packers WR Bob Long (Wichita State hooper in 1960-61 and 1961-62 under coach Ralph Miller) had a nine-yard pass reception. . . . San Francisco 49ers DB Ronnie Lott (USC hooper as junior in 1979-80) had two interceptions in a 34-9 playoff win against the Minnesota Vikings following 1988 season. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers WR Antwaan Randle El (member of Indiana's 1999 NCAA Tournament team) had 81-yard punt return for a touchdown in 35-21 win against the Detroit Lions in 2006.

2: Miami Dolphins WR Chris Chambers (played hoops briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) caught four passes for 146 yards in a 30-23 setback against the Baltimore Ravens in 2005. . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught 14 passes for 144 yards in a 24-17 setback against the San Diego Chargers in 2005. . . . Miami Dolphins QB Bob Griese (sophomore guard for Purdue in 1964-65) opened the game's scoring by throwing a 75-yard touchdown pass to Paul Warfield in 21-0 playoff win against the Baltimore Colts following 1971 season. . . . Green Bay Packers RB Paul Hornung (averaged 6.1 ppg in 10 contests for Notre Dame in 1954-55) rushed for a 13-yard touchdown in 23-12 playoff win against the Cleveland Browns following 1965 season. . . . Philadelphia Eagles rookie QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw three touchdown passes in a 38-31 win against the St. Louis Rams in 1999 season finale. . . . Miami Dolphins WR Lamar Thomas (collected 16 points and 4 rebounds in four games for Miami FL in 1990-91) caught a 12-yard touchdown pass from Dan Marino in the fourth quarter to provide the difference in 24-17 playoff win against the Buffalo Bills following 1998 season. . . . Dallas Cowboys P Ron Widby (three-time All-SEC selection for Tennessee from 1964-65 through 1966-67 averaged 14.5 ppg and 8.3 rpg as sophomore, 17.3 ppg and 8 rpg as junior and 22.1 ppg and 8.7 rpg as senior) punted six times for 270 yards (45.0 average) in a 14-3 playoff win against the San Francisco 49ers following 1971 season.

3: Philadelphia Eagles WR Harold Carmichael (starter two seasons for Southern LA averaged 9.8 ppg and 10.6 rpg in 1969-70) had a playoff-career high seven pass receptions in 31-16 win against the Minnesota Vikings in 1981. . . . Baltimore Colts CB Jim Duncan (UMES hooper) returned four kickoffs for 105 yards (26.3 average) in a 27-17 playoff win against the Oakland Raiders following 1970 season. . . . TE Darren Fells (averaged 10.2 ppg and 6.3 rpg from 2004-05 through 2007-08, leading UCI in rebounding each of last three seasons) opened the Arizona Cardinals' scoring by catching a touchdown pass in 27-16 setback against the Carolina Panthers in playoffs following 2014 season. . . . San Diego Chargers TE Antonio Gates (second-team All-MAC selection in 2002 when Kent State finished runner-up in South Regional) had eight pass receptions in a 23-17 playoff win against the Indianapolis Colts following 2008 season. . . . Minnesota Vikings TE Andrew Glover (All-SWAC second-team selection as senior in 1990-91 when leading Grambling with 16.2 ppg and 8.6 rpg while pacing league in field-goal shooting) had three pass receptions for 84 yards in a 38-22 playoff setback against the San Francisco 49ers following 1997 season. 49ers RB Terry Kirby (averaged 3.4 ppg as Virginia freshman in 1989-90 and 2.1 as sophomore in 1990-91) rushed for two touchdowns on goal-line plunges. . . . TE Demetrius Harris (led Milwaukee in FG% and rebounding as senior in 2012-13) contributed the Kansas City Chiefs' final score with a 15-yard touchdown reception from Alex Smith in 23-17 win against the Oakland Raiders in 2015 season finale. . . . Baltimore Ravens TE Todd Heap (grabbed 14 rebounds in 11 games for Arizona State in 1999-00) caught a 35-yard touchdown pass in 20-17 playoff setback against the Tennessee Titans following 2003 season. . . . St. Louis Rams WR Jordan Kent (part-time starter for Oregon under his father while averaging 3.1 ppg and 3.3 rpg from 2003-04 through 2005-06) had his lone NFL pass reception (five yards against San Francisco 49ers in 2009 regular-season finale). . . . San Francisco 49ers DB Ronnie Lott (USC hooper as junior in 1979-80) had two interceptions - returning one of them 20 yards for a fourth-quarter touchdown - in 38-24 playoff win against the New York Giants following 1981 season. . . . San Francisco 49ers WR Terrell Owens (UTC hooper from 1993-94 through 1995-96 started five games) caught a game-winning 25-yard touchdown pass from Steve Young in 30-27 playoff win against the Green Bay Packers following 1998 season. . . . Carolina Panthers DE Julius Peppers (averaged 5.7 ppg and 3.7 rpg while shooting 60.7% from floor for North Carolina in 1999-00 and 2000-01) returned an interception 34 yards in 29-10 playoff win against the Dallas Cowboys following 2003 season. . . . San Francisco 49ers TE Bob Windsor (played two games for Kentucky in 1965-66 under coach Adolph Rupp) caught three passes for 70 yards in a 17-10 playoff setback against the Dallas Cowboys following 1970 season.

4: Minnesota Vikings QB Joe Kapp (backup forward averaged 1.8 ppg and 1.2 rpg for California's PCC champions in 1957 and 1958) threw a 75-yard touchdown pass to Gene Washington in 27-7 playoff win against the Cleveland Browns following 1969 season. . . . Cleveland Browns WR Dave Logan (three-time scoring runner-up averaged 14.1 ppg and 6.3 rpg for Colorado in mid-1970s) had two pass receptions for 36 yards in a 14-12 playoff setback against the Oakland Raiders following 1980 season. Browns RB Greg Pruitt (Oklahoma frosh hooper in 1969-70) caught three passes for 54 yards. Browns WR Reggie Rucker (averaged 6.8 ppg and 3.8 rpg for Boston University in 1966-67) caught two passes for 38 yards. . . . Dallas Cowboys RB Preston Pearson (swingman averaged 8.7 ppg and 6 rpg as Illinois senior in 1966-67) caught three of four touchdown passes by Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) in a 37-7 playoff win against the Los Angeles Rams following 1975 season. . . . Kansas City Chiefs WR Andre Rison (backup hoops guard for Michigan State in 1987-88) had playoff career-highs of eight pass catches and 110 receiving yards in a 14-10 setback against the Denver Broncos following 1997 season. Broncos DE Alfred Williams (Colorado hooper in 1989-90) had two sacks.

5: New England Patriots LB Don Blackmon (collected 42 points and 32 rebounds in 12 games for Tulsa in 1977-78) registered two sacks in a 27-20 playoff win against the Oakland Raiders following 1985 season. . . . San Diego Chargers DT Ernie Ladd (intended on only playing hoops for Grambling before legendary coach Eddie Robinson got him to play football) had a sack in 51-10 win against the Boston Patriots in AFL championship game following 1963 season. . . . San Francisco 49ers WR Terrell Owens (UTC hooper from 1993-94 through 1995-96 started five games) had nine pass receptions for 177 yards - including two touchdowns from Jeff Garcia (76 and 26 yards) - in a 39-38 playoff win against the New York Giants following 2002 season. . . . WR Antwaan Randle El (member of Indiana's 1999 NCAA Tournament team) returned a punt 66 yards for the Pittsburgh Steelers' first touchdown in 36-33 playoff win against the Cleveland Browns following 2002 season. Five years later, Randle El had a seven-yard TD reception for the Washington Redskins' first score in 35-14 playoff setback against the Seattle Seahawks following 2007 campaign.

6: San Diego Chargers WR Chris Chambers (played hoops briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) had six pass receptions for 121 yards in a 17-6 playoff win against the Tennessee Titans following 2007 season. Chargers WR Vincent Jackson (Northern Colorado's scoring leader with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg) had five pass receptions for 114 yards - including a 25-yard touchdown from Philip Rivers. . . . TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) provided the Kansas City Chiefs' lone touchdown with a six-yard pass from Trent Green in 23-8 playoff setback against the Indianapolis Colts following 2006 season. . . . New Orleans Saints WR Willie Jackson (started five hoops games for Florida in 1989-90) had nine pass receptions in a 34-16 playoff setback against the Minnesota Vikings following 2000 season. . . . San Francisco 49ers DB Ronnie Lott (USC hooper as junior in 1979-80) returned an interception 58 yards for a fourth-quarter touchdown in 41-13 playoff win against the Minnesota Vikings following 1989 season. . . . San Francisco 49ers WR Terrell Owens (UTC hooper from 1993-94 through 1995-96 started five games) closed out the regular season with two first-quarter touchdown passes from Jeff Garcia (56 and 60 yards) in a 38-0 win against the New Orleans Saints in 2002.

7: Dallas Cowboys QB Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) threw two fourth-quarter touchdown passes in a 28-0 playoff win against the Los Angeles Rams following 1978 season.

8: Oakland Raiders RB Greg Pruitt (Oklahoma frosh hooper in 1969-70) rushed three times for 15 yards, caught two passes for 14 yards, returned two kickoffs for 57 yards and returned five punts for 45 yards in a 27-10 playoff win against the Cleveland Browns following 1982 season.

9: Cincinnati Bengals QB Ken Anderson (swingman finished Augustana IL career in early 1970s as fifth-leading scorer in school history with 1,044 points) threw two first-quarter touchdown passes in a 44-17 playoff setback against the New York Jets following the 1982 season. . . . Bud Grant (third-leading scorer for Minnesota in 1948-49 after named team MVP previous season over first-team All-American Jim McIntyre) coached the Minnesota Vikings when they suffered a 32-14 setback against the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XI following 1976 season. . . . Minnesota Vikings TE Joe Senser (two-time NCAA Division I leader in FG% averaged 11.4 ppg and 7.4 rpg while shooting 66.2% from floor in four-year career for West Chester State PA) caught six passes for 81 yards in a 30-24 playoff win against the Atlanta Falcons following 1982 campaign. . . . Denver Broncos WR Kitrick Taylor (Washington State hooper in 1984-85 and 1986-87) had a 13-yard pass reception in 42-24 playoff setback against the Oakland Raiders following 1993 season. . . . Dallas Cowboys rookie DE Peppi Zellner (averaged 10.3 ppg and team-high 9.1 rpg for Fort Valley State GA in 1997-98) had four tackles in a 27-10 playoff setback against the Minnesota Vikings following 1999 campaign.

10: Cincinnati Bengals QB Ken Anderson (swingman finished Augustana IL career in early 1970s as fifth-leading scorer in school history with 1,044 points) threw two touchdown passes in a 27-7 playoff win against the San Diego Chargers following 1981 season. . . . Tennessee Titans WR Justin Gage (averaged 2.1 ppg and 2.9 rpg for Missouri from 1999-00 through 2001-02) had 10 pass receptions for 135 yards in a 13-10 playoff setback against the Baltimore Ravens following 2008 season. . . . Minnesota Vikings TE Andrew Glover (All-SWAC second-team selection as senior in 1990-91 when leading Grambling with 16.2 ppg and 8.6 rpg while pacing league in field-goal shooting) caught a touchdown pass from Randall Cunningham in 41-21 playoff win against the Arizona Cardinals following 1998 season. . . . St. Louis Rams WR Dane Looker (averaged 4.8 ppg as Western Washington freshman in 1995-96 and 10.2 ppg as sophomore in 1996-97 before transferring to Washington and concentrating on football) caught two passes for 31 yards and a two-point conversion late in fourth quarter of 29-23 playoff setback in double overtime against the Carolina Panthers following 2003 season.

11: Chicago Bears DE Doug Atkins (third-leading scorer as Tennessee center with 9.9 ppg in 1950-51) named co-NFL Pro Bowl MVP following the 1958 season. . . . Cleveland Browns DE Sam Clancy (two-time Eastern 8 first-team selection ended career in 1981 as Pittsburgh's all-time leading rebounder) had a sack in his second straight playoff game following the 1986 campaign. . . . Bud Grant (third-leading scorer for Minnesota in 1948-49 after named team MVP previous season over first-team All-American Jim McIntyre) coached the Minnesota Vikings when they suffered a 23-7 setback against the Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl IV following 1969 season. Vikings QB Joe Kapp (backup forward averaged 1.8 ppg and 1.2 rpg for California's PCC champions in 1957 and 1958) completed 16-of-25 passes for 183 yards. Chiefs FL Otis Taylor (backup small forward for Prairie View A&M) caught a 46-yard touchdown pass from Len Dawson (Purdue hooper in 1956-57). . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw two touchdown passes in a 20-17 playoff win against the Green Bay Packers following 2003 season.

12: Tampa Bay Buccaneers TE Rickey Dudley (averaged 13.3 ppg and 7.5 rpg as senior in 1994-95 when leading Ohio State in rebounding and finishing third in scoring) caught a 12-yard touchdown pass from Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) in 31-6 playoff win against the San Francisco 49ers following 2002 season. Johnson threw two second-quarter TD passes. . . . Weeb Ewbank (hoops letterman for Miami OH in 1926-27 and 1927-28) coached the New York Jets to a 16-7 victory against the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III following 1968 season. Jets DB Johnny Sample (freshman hooper for UMES) had an interception. . . . Bud Grant (third-leading scorer for Minnesota in 1948-49 after named team MVP previous season over first-team All-American Jim McIntyre) coached the Minnesota Vikings when they suffered a 16-6 setback against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl IX following 1974 season. . . . Baltimore Ravens WR Jacoby Jones (part-time starter averaged 3.4 ppg and 3.7 rpg for Lane TN in 2004-05 and 2005-06) caught a 70-yard touchdown pass from Joe Flacco with 31 seconds remaining in regulation to tie the score before they won against the Denver Broncos, 38-35, in double overtime in playoff game following 2012 season. . . . Jacksonville Jaguars WR Matt Jones (started two of his 11 Arkansas games in 2001-02 when averaging 4.2 ppg and 2.3 rpg and 10 of 17 in 2003-04 when averaging 5 ppg and 4.5 rpg) opened the game's scoring with an eight-yard touchdown catch in a 31-20 playoff setback against the New England Patriots following 2007 season. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw two second-quarter touchdown passes in a 31-9 playoff win against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers following 2001 season. . . . New England Patriots TE Derrick Ramsey (grabbed three rebounds in two Kentucky games in 1975-76) caught a touchdown pass in 31-14 playoff win against the Miami Dolphins following 1985 season.

13: San Diego Chargers WR Chris Chambers (played hoops briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) caught a 30-yard touchdown pass from Philip Rivers in 28-24 playoff win against the Indianapolis Colts following 2007 season. Chargers WR Vincent Jackson (Northern Colorado's scoring leader with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg) had team highs of seven pass receptions and 93 receiving yards. . . . Miami Dolphins DE Vern Den Herder (finished Central College IA career in 1970-71 as school's all-time leading scorer and rebounder) delivered a sack in 24-7 win against the Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl VIII following 1973 season. Bud Grant (third-leading scorer for Minnesota in 1948-49 after named team MVP previous season over first-team All-American Jim McIntyre) coached the Vikings. . . . WR Terrell Owens (UTC hooper from 1993-94 through 1995-96 started five games) opened the Dallas Cowboys' scoring with a five-yard touchdown pass from Tony Romo in 21-17 playoff setback against the New York Giants following 2007 season.

14: Following the 1961 season, Cleveland Browns FB Jim Brown (#2-scorer with 14 ppg for Syracuse as sophomore in 1954-55 before averaging 11.3 as junior) earned his first of three NFL Pro Bowl MVP awards in a five-year span. . . . New Orleans Saints TE Jimmy Graham (part-time starter for Miami FL averaged 4.2 ppg and 4.2 rpg from 2005-06 through 2008-09) caught two touchdown passes from Drew Brees - including 66-yarder - in a 36-32 playoff setback against the San Francisco 49ers following 2011 season. . . . Cleveland Browns QB Otto Graham (Big Ten Conference runner-up in scoring as Northwestern sophomore in 1941-42 and junior in 1942-43) named NFL Pro Bowl MVP following the 1950 season.

15: Kansas City Chiefs TE Reg Carolan (Idaho three-year letterman in early 1960s averaged 4 ppg and 4.7 rpg) had a seven-yard pass reception in 35-10 setback against the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl I following 1966 campaign. . . . Baltimore Ravens TE Todd Heap (grabbed 14 rebounds in 11 games for Arizona State in 1999-00) caught a four-yard touchdown pass from Joe Flacco in 31-24 playoff setback against the Pittsburgh Steelers following 2010 season. . . . St. Louis Rams WR Dane Looker (averaged 4.8 ppg as Western Washington freshman in 1995-96 and 10.2 ppg as sophomore in 1996-97 before transferring to Washington and concentrating on football) caught three passes for 38 yards and rushed once for 11 yards in a 47-17 playoff setback against the Atlanta Falcons following 2004 season. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers WR Antwaan Randle El (member of Indiana's 1999 NCAA Tournament team) opened the game's scoring with a six-yard touchdown pass from Ben Roethlisberger in 21-18 playoff win against the Indianapolis Colts following 2005 season.

16: Dallas Cowboys TE Mike Ditka (averaged 2.8 ppg and 2.6 rpg for Pittsburgh in 1958-59 and 1959-60) caught a seven-yard touchdown pass from Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) in 24-3 win against the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl VI following 1971 season. Staubach threw two TD passes in the game. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw two first-half touchdown passes in a 27-14 playoff win against the Minnesota Vikings following 2004 season. . . . San Francisco 49ers E Billy Wilson (averaged 3.3 ppg as senior letterman for San Jose State in 1950-51) named NFL Pro Bowl MVP following the 1954 season.

17: San Diego Chargers TE Antonio Gates (second-team All-MAC selection in 2002 when Kent State finished runner-up in South Regional) had eight pass receptions in a 17-14 playoff setback against the New York Jets following 2009 season. Chargers WR Vincent Jackson (Northern Colorado's scoring leader with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg) had seven receptions for 111 receiving yards. . . . Baltimore Colts TE John Mackey (Syracuse hooper in 1960-61) caught a 75-yard touchdown pass from Johnny Unitas in 16-13 win against the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl V following 1970 season.

18: Dallas Cowboys TE Jean Fugett (leading scorer and rebounder for Amherst MA as junior in 1970-71) had a pass reception in 21-17 setback against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl X following 1975 season. Cowboys WR Percy Howard (All-OVC selection as senior averaged 12.4 ppg and 7.3 rpg for Austin Peay from 1972-73 through 1974-75) caught a 34-yard touchdown pass from Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) in the fourth quarter. Staubach threw two TD passes in the game. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw three second-half touchdown passes in a 32-25 playoff setback against the Arizona Cardinals following 2008 season. . . . Indianapolis Colts TE Marcus Pollard (JC transfer averaged 7.3 ppg and 5 rpg for Bradley in 1992-93 and 1993-94) had a game-high 90 receiving yards in 24-14 playoff setback against the New England Patriots following 2003 season.

19: Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw two touchdown passes in a 33-19 playoff win against the Chicago Bears following 2001 season. . . . Denver Broncos TE Julius Thomas (averaged 6.8 ppg and 4.3 rpg while shooting 66.3% from floor with Portland State from 2006-07 through 2009-10) had playoff career-high eight pass receptions in a 26-16 win against the New England Patriots following 2013 season.

20: San Diego Chargers WR Chris Chambers (played hoops briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) had a playoff career-high seven pass receptions in 21-12 setback against the New England Patriots following 2007 season. . . . Atlanta Falcons TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) had eight pass receptions - one for touchdown - in a 28-24 playoff setback against the San Francisco 49ers following 2012 season. . . . DB R.W. McQuarters (Oklahoma State hooper in 1995-96 and 1996-97 started two games) had an interception in his third consecutive playoff game to help the New York Giants reach Super Bowl XLII following 2007 season.

21: Dallas Cowboys QB Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) threw three touchdown passes in a 35-31 setback against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XIII following 1978 season.

22: Green Bay Packers CB Quinten Rollins (led Miami OH in steals all four seasons from 2010-11 through 2013-14 including Mid-American Conference as senior) had four tackles in a 44-21 setback against the Atlanta Falcons in NFC championship game following 2016 season. Packers LB Julius Peppers (averaged 5.7 ppg and 3.7 rpg while shooting 60.7% from floor for North Carolina in 1999-00 and 2000-01) chipped in with two tackles.

23: Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw two touchdown passes in a 27-10 playoff win against the Atlanta Falcons following 2004 season.

24: QB Ken Anderson (swingman finished Augustana IL career in early 1970s as fifth-leading scorer in school history with 1,044 points) accounted for all three of the Cincinnati Bengals' three touchdowns (two passing/one rushing in second half) in a 26-21 setback against the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XVI following 1981 season. . . . Green Bay Packers LB Fred Carr (played for defending NCAA champion Texas Western in 1967 playoffs) shared the NFL Pro Bowl MVP award following 1970 season. . . . Arizona Cardinals TE Darren Fells (averaged 10.2 ppg and 6.3 rpg from 2004-05 through 2007-08, leading UCI in rebounding each of last three seasons) caught a 21-yard touchdown pass from Carson Palmer in 49-15 setback against the Charlotte Panthers in NFC championship game following 2015 season.

25: New York Giants DE George Martin (Oregon teammate of freshman sensation Ron Lee in 1972-73) tackled John Elway for a safety in 39-20 win against the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXI following 1986 season.

26: Mike Ditka (averaged 2.8 ppg and 2.6 rpg for Pittsburgh in 1958-59 and 1959-60) coached Chicago Bears to a 46-10 win against the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX following 1985 season. Patriots TE Derrick Ramsey (grabbed three rebounds in two Kentucky games in 1975-76) caught two passes for 16 yards. . . . Tampa Bay Buccaneers QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) threw two touchdown passes in a 48-21 win against the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XXXVII following 2002 season. . . . Buffalo Bills TE Pete Metzelaars (averaged 19.2 ppg and 11.4 rpg for Wabash IN while setting NCAA Division III field-goal shooting records for single season as senior in 1981-82 and career) caught a two-yard touchdown pass from Jim Kelly in 37-24 setback against the Washington Redskins in Super Bowl XXVI following 1991 season. . . . Green Bay Packers WR Andre Rison (backup hoops guard for Michigan State in 1987-88) opened the game's scoring with a 54-yard touchdown reception from Brett Favre in 35-21 win against the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI following 1996 season.

29: Bobby Ross (averaged 3 ppg as VMI freshman in 1955-56) coached the San Diego Chargers when they lost against the San Francisco 49ers, 49-26, in Super Bowl XXIX following 1994 season.

30: Buffalo Bills coach Marv Levy (earned hoops letter with Coe IA in 1949-50) lost his fourth consecutive Super Bowl game (30-13 against Dallas Cowboys following 1993 season). Bills TE Keith McKeller (starting center for Jacksonville State's 1985 NCAA Division II championship team led Gulf South Conference in rebounding each of his first three seasons and finished second as senior) had at least one pass reception in his fourth straight Super Bowl.

31: Denver Broncos WR Rod Smith (swingman was Missouri Southern State hoops letterman as sophomore in 1990-91) caught an 80-yard touchdown pass from John Elway in 34-19 win against the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl XXXIII following 1998 season.

Impact of former college hoopers on professional football in December
Impact of former college hoopers on professional football in November
Impact of former college hoopers on professional football in October
Impact of former college hoopers on professional football in September

On This Date: January Calendar of Most Memorable Games in NCAA History

Louisiana State's Pete Maravich, the NCAA's career scoring leader, still holds the all-time single-game scoring mark by an individual opponent against eight universities (Alabama, Auburn, Duquesne, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi State, Tulane and Vanderbilt). Do you know who holds the mark for highest output against the Tigers? It was achieved this month by Ole Miss' Johnny Neumann, who fired in a school-record 63 points at LSU the season after Maravich's eligibility expired.

This month also features UCLA's single-game rebounding record and the mark wasn't established by Lew Alcindor or Bill Walton. Speaking of rebounding, existing single-game standards against a Division I opponent for Lamar and Oral Roberts were set in the same contest in 1972 and USC's single-game mark against a DI foe came from two different players on the same day 22 years apart. In one of the most dominating performances of the 20th Century, Rick Barry set Miami FL scoring and rebounding records in the same game. Following is a day-by-day calendar citing memorable moments in January college basketball history:

JANUARY
1 - Hank Luisetti (50 points vs. Duquesne at Cleveland in 1938) set Stanford's single-game scoring record. . . . Seton Hall's school-record 46-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by William & Mary (57-55 in 1954). . . . Penn opposed Yale in 1927 in debut game at the legendary Palestra in Philadelphia. . . . Bailey Howell (34 vs. Louisiana State in 1957) set Mississippi State's single-game rebounding record.
2 - Georgia State's Chris Collier (49 points vs. Butler in 1991), Quinnipiac's Rob Monroe (41 vs. Longwood in double overtime in 2005) and Wofford's Ian Chadwick (40 at Georgia Southern in 2001) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Mississippi State's school-record 35-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Auburn (64-48 in 1960). . . . Morehead State's Steve Hamilton (38 vs. Florida State in 1957) and Murray State's Dick Cunningham (36 vs. MacMurray IL in 1967) set school single-game rebounding records. . . . Eventual MLB INF Jack Kubiszyn scored a career-high 47 points for Alabama in a game against Mississippi College in 1957.
3 - Markus Howard set Marquette scoring record and tied Big East Conference game standard (52 points at Providence in 2018). . . . Jamal Barney (41 at Canisius in 2009) set Division I single-game scoring record for Loyola (Md.). . . . Wake Forest snapped North Carolina State's school-record 36-game winning streak (83-78 in 1975). . . . Brigham Young's school-record 53-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Wake Forest (94-87 in 2009). . . . Pacific Coast Conference cellar dweller Oregon upset NCAA Tournament champion-to-be California in 1959. . . . DePaul's Ken Warzynski (28 vs. Harvard in 1970), Long Beach State's Michael Zeno (22 vs. Loyola Marymount in 1983) and Wisconsin's Paul Morrow (30 vs. Purdue in 1953) set school single-game rebounding records against a major-college opponent.
4 - Ball State's Chris Williams (48 points at Akron in overtime in 2003), Jacksonville State's Trenton Marshall (37 at Southeast Missouri State in 2010), Lamar's Mike James (52 vs. Louisiana College in 2011), Loyola Marymount's Bo Kimble (54 at St. Joseph's in 1990) and Texas-El Paso's Jim Barnes (51 vs. Western New Mexico in 1964) set school single-game scoring records. . . . In 2003, Butler's Darnell Archey established an NCAA Division I standard by converting his 74th of 85 consecutive free throws. . . . Illinois' school-record 31-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Iowa (60-59 in 1986). . . . Delaware's Jack Waddington (31 vs. Rutgers in 1956), Middle Tennessee State's Mike Milholland (32 vs. Austin Peay State in 1965), Nebraska's Bill Johnson (26 vs. Iowa State in 1954), Nevada's Pete Padgett (30 vs. Loyola Marymount in 1973) and Valparaiso's Chris Ensminger (24 vs. Northeastern Illinois in 1996) set school single-game rebounding records.
5 - Eastern Washington's Rodney Stuckey (45 points at Northern Arizona in 2006), Michigan State's Terry Furlow (50 vs. Iowa in 1976) and West Virginia's Hot Rod Hundley (54 vs. Furman in 1957) set school single-game scoring records. . . . Eastern Michigan's Derrick Dial (45 vs. Marshall in 1998) and Stephen F. Austin State's Scott Dimak (40 at Texas Southern in 1989) set school single-game scoring records against a DI opponent. . . . In 1991, Loyola Marymount's 186-point output is the highest in NCAA history by a team in a single game and Kevin Bradshaw's 72-point outburst for U.S. International CA is the most ever for a player against a major-college opponent. . . . Fairfield's Darren Phillip (25 vs. Marist in 2000), Texas-San Antonio's Lennell Moore (25 vs. Centenary in 1987) and Tulane's Mel Payton (31 vs. Mississippi State in 1951) set school single-game rebounding records against a DI opponent. . . . Sacramento State's NCAA-record 56-game losing streak away from home (road and neutral sites) ended with a 68-56 success at Loyola of Chicago in 1995.
6 - Drexel's John Rankin (44 points vs. Rider in 1988), Pepperdine's William "Bird" Averitt (57 vs. Nevada-Reno in 1973) and Xavier's Steve Thomas (50 vs. Detroit in 1964) set school single-game scoring records. Averitt's output is also a West Coast Conference record in league competition. . . . Ernie Losch (41 vs. Utah State in 1973) set Tulane's single-game scoring record against a Division I opponent. . . . Bob Mortell (24 vs. Virginia Military in 1960) set Virginia's single-game rebounding record against a DI opponent.
7 - UC Riverside's Rickey Porter (40 points at Pacific in 2006), Campbell's Clarence Grier (39 vs. Virginia Wesleyan in 1987), Michigan's Rudy Tomjanovich (48 vs. Indiana in overtime in 1969) and Southwest Texas State's Lynwood Wade (42 vs. Sam Houston State in double overtime in 1993) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Odell Johnson (40 vs. Pepperdine in 1956) set Saint Mary's single-game scoring record against a major-college opponent. . . . North Carolina hit an NCAA-record 94.1% of its second-half field-goal attempts (16-of-17 vs. Virginia in 1978). . . . Niagara's Gary Bossert set an NCAA single-game record by hitting 11 consecutive three-point field-goal attempts against Siena in 1987. . . . Long Beach State ended UNLV's Big West Conference-record 40-game winning streak (101-94 in 1993), Pacific's school-record 45-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Long Beach State (91-85 in 1973), Tennessee's school-record 37-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Gonzaga (89-79 in overtime) and UNLV's school-record 72-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by New Mexico (102-98 in 1978). . . . Alex "Boo" Ellis (31 vs. Kent State in 1957) set Niagara's single-game rebounding record.
8 - Arizona State's Eddie House (61 points at California in double overtime in 2000) set the school and tied the Pac-12 Conference single-game scoring record. . . . Michael Hicks (47 points at Cal Poly in overtime in 2001) set Texas A&M-Corpus Christi's single-game scoring record. . . . Georgia Tech snapped Kentucky's NCAA-record 129-game homecourt winning streak and SEC-record 51-game winning streak in 1955. . . . Nelson Richardson (26 vs. Manhattan in 1977) set Siena's single-game rebounding record.
9 - Cincinnati sophomore Oscar Robertson (56 points) personally outscored Seton Hall in a 118-54 rout of the Pirates at Madison Square Garden in 1958. . . . Alabama's Jerry Harper (28 vs. Mississippi State in 1956), Texas-Arlington's Albert Culton (24 vs. Northeastern in 1981), Villanova's Howard Porter (30 vs. St. Peter's in 1971) and Virginia Tech's Chris Smith (36 vs. Washington & Lee VA in 1959) set school single-game rebounding records against a major-college opponent.
10 - Connecticut's Bill Corley (51 points vs. New Hampshire in 1968), John Conforti of St. Francis NY (45 vs. Wagner in 1970), Washington's Bob Houbregs (49 vs. Idaho in 1953) and Winthrop's Melvin Branham (45 at Charleston Southern in 1994) set school single-game scoring records. . . . Navy's David Robinson (45 at James Madison in 1987) set CAA scoring record in league competition. . . . Saint Joseph's and Xavier combined to have an NCAA-record eight players foul out in 1976. . . . Connecticut's school-record 31-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Marquette (73-69 in 2007) and Western Kentucky's school-record 67-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Xavier (82-80 in overtime in 1955). . . . Ed Diddle made his Western Kentucky head coaching debut in 1923 with a 103-7 decision over the Adairville Independents en route to a school-record 759 victories. . . . Kentucky's Adolph Rupp became the coach to compile 500 victories the fastest with a 92-59 win over DePaul in 1955 (584 games in 23rd season). . . . Louisiana-Lafayette's Roy Ebron (28 vs. Northwestern State in 1972) and Vanderbilt's Clyde Lee (28 vs. Mississippi in 1966) set school single-game rebounding records.
11 - Don Scaife (43 points at Samford in 1975) set Arkansas State's Division I single-game scoring record. . . . Texas Tech's school-record 35-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Colorado (80-78 in 1997). . . . Alcorn State's Larry Smith (21 vs. Mississippi Valley State in 1979), UC Santa Barbara's Eric McArthur (28 vs. New Mexico State in 1990) and Dartmouth's Rudy LaRusso (32 vs. Columbia in 1958) set school single-game rebounding records against a DI opponent. . . . Bill Clark (23 vs. Oakland in 1973) set Ball State's single-game rebounding record at DI level. 12 - Bucknell's Al Leslie (45 points vs. American in 1980) set the East Coast Conference single-game scoring record. . . . Mike Olliver (50 at Portland State in 1980) set Lamar's single-game scoring record against a Division I opponent. . . . Iowa State's school-record 39-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Oklahoma State (69-66 in 2002) and Michigan State's school-record 53-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Wisconsin (64-63 in 2002). . . . Marshall's Charlie Slack (43 vs. Morris Harvey in 1954), Monmouth's Karl Towns (23 vs. Morgan State in 1985) and Robert Morris' Mike Morton (20 vs. Baltimore in 1980) set school single-game rebounding records.
13 - Boise State's Chandler Hutchison (44 points vs. San Diego State in 2018), Bowling Green's Jim Darrow (52 vs. Toledo in overtime in 1960), Cal Poly's Shanta Cotright (43 vs. George Mason in 1996), Charleston Southern's Dwyane Jackson (43 at Virginia Military in 2007), Kentucky's Jodie Meeks (54 at Tennessee in 2009), Sacramento State's Loren Leath (41 at Northern Colorado in 2009), Southeastern Louisiana's Sam Bowie (39 at Central Florida in 1996), Southeast Missouri State's Daimon Gonner (37 at Tennessee State in double overtime in 2005) and UAB's Andy Kennedy (41 vs. Saint Louis in 1991) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Oklahoma ended Kansas' NCAA-record 35-game winning streak on the road, 45-19, in 1928. . . . Marquette's school-record 81-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Notre Dame (71-69 in 1973). . . . Doug Hess (27 vs. Marshall in 1971) tied Toledo's single-game rebounding record against a DI opponent.
14 - Syracuse's Bill Smith (47 points vs. Lafayette in 1971) and Virginia Commonwealth's Chris Cheeks (42 vs. Old Dominion in overtime in 1989) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Damon Stoudamire (45 at Stanford in 1995) set Arizona's single-game scoring record against a DI opponent.
15 - Coppin State's school-record 42-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by North Carolina A&T (76-70 in 1997), Murray State's school-record 47-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Southeast Missouri State (84-78 in 2000) and Virginia's school-record 34-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by North Carolina (101-95 in 1983). . . . Texas-Pan American ended its NCAA-record 64-game road losing streak with a 79-62 triumph at Oral Roberts in 2000. . . . Bob Reiter (27 vs. Kansas State in 1955) set Missouri's single-game rebounding record. . . . . Bob Lazor (23 vs. Penn State in 1955) set Pittsburgh's single-game rebounding record against a major-college opponent.
16 - Columbia's school-record 34-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Penn (66-64 in 1952).
17 - New Mexico State's John Williamson (48 points at California in 1972) and UNC Wilmington's Brian Rowsom (39 at East Carolina in 1987) set school single-game scoring records. . . . Virginia Military's school-record 35-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Appalachian State (73-58 in 1979). . . . Steve Stiepler (22 vs. Charleston Southern in 1977) set James Madison's single-game rebounding record.
18 - Stan Mayhew (45 points vs. Utah State in 1977) set Weber State's single-game scoring record. . . . Damon Lynn (34 at North Carolina A&T in 2014) set NJIT's single-game scoring record at the NCAA Division I level. . . . A weekly ritual began when the Associated Press announced results of its first weekly basketball poll in 1949 (SLU was initial #1). . . . Indiana State's Jim Cruse (25 vs. Drake in 1997) and North Texas' Ken Williams (29 vs. Lamar in 1978) set school single-game rebounding records.
19 - UC Davis' Corey Hawkins (40 points at Hawaii in 2013), Charleston Southern's Ben Hinson (43 vs. Edward Waters FL in 1985) and New Hampshire's Brad Cirino (39 at Maine in four overtimes in 1996) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Jim Ashmore (45 vs. Mississippi in 1957) set Mississippi State's single-game scoring record against a DI opponent. . . . Notre Dame came from behind in the closing minutes to end visiting UCLA's NCAA-record 88-game winning streak in 1974. . . . George Mason's Andre Smith set an NCAA single-game record by sinking all 10 of his shots from beyond the three-point arc against James Madison in 2008. . . . Ron deVries (24 vs. Pacific in 1974) set Illinois State's single-game rebounding record against a DI opponent. . . . Chris Street, Iowa's top rebounder with 9.5 per game, died instantly in 1993 in a collision between the car he was driving and a county dumptruck/snowplow.
20 - Austin Peay's James "Fly" Williams (51 points vs. Tennessee Tech in 1973), Fordham's Ken Charles (46 vs. St. Peter's in 1973), Memphis State's Larry Finch (48 vs. St. Joseph's IN in 1973) and Oklahoma City's Gary Gray (55 at West Texas State in 1967) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Houston ended UCLA's 47-game winning streak (71-69 in Astrodome in 1968), Minnesota's school-record 40-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Nebraska (22-21 in 1905) and West Virginia's school-record 39-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by St. Bonaventure (64-63 in 1983). . . . Visiting Texas-El Paso snapped Memphis' NCAA-record 52-game winning streak in regular-season conference competition (C-USA/72-67 in 2010). . . . Cliff Robinson (28 vs. Portland State in 1978) and David Bluthenthal (28 vs. Arizona State in 2000) set and tied Southern California's single-game rebounding record against a DI opponent.
21 - Howard's Ron Williamson (52 points vs. North Carolina A&T in 2003) and Saint Joseph's Jack Egan (47 at Gettysburg PA in 1961) set school single-game scoring records. . . . Kansas' school-record 69-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Texas (74-63 in 2011) and DePaul's school-record 36-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Dayton (67-63 in 1985). . . . Terry Rutherford (21 vs. Marshall in 1978) set Western Carolina's single-game rebounding record against a Division I opponent.
22 - Lee Campbell (20 vs. Cleveland State in 1990) tied his own Missouri State single-game rebounding record against a Division I opponent.
23 - Eastern Illinois' Jay Taylor (47 points vs. Chicago State in 1989), Middle Tennessee State's Mike Milholland (44 vs. Austin Peay in 1965), Nicholls State's Anatoly Bose (46 at Northwestern State in double overtime in 2010), South Florida's Dominique Jones (46 at Providence in overtime in 2010) and Tennessee State's Anthony Mason (44 at Eastern Kentucky in 1988) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Jacksonville's James Ray (45 vs. South Florida in 1980) set Sun Belt Conference single-game scoring record in league competition. . . . Northeastern's Steve Carney (23 vs. Hartford in 1988) and Ohio University's Howard Joliff (28 vs. Kent State in 1960) set school single-game rebounding records against a DI opponent.
24 - Appalachian State's Stan Davis (56 points at Carson-Newman TN in 1974), Chattanooga's Oliver Morton (50 vs. Pikeville KY in 2001), IUPUI's Odell Bradley (41 vs. Oral Roberts in triple overtime in 2004), Loyola of New Orleans' Ty Marioneaux (53 vs. Virginia Commonwealth in 1970), Oakland's Travis Bader (47 vs. IUPUI in 2013) and Texas-Arlington's Steven Barber (43 at Texas-San Antonio in 2002) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . San Diego State's Ben Wardrop set an NCAA record for shortest playing time before disqualification by fouling out in only 1:11 at Colorado State in 2004. . . . Notre Dame's school-record 45-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Connecticut (69-61 in 2009).
25 - Connell "C.J." Wilkerson (41 points at North Carolina A&T in 2011) set North Carolina Central's single-game scoring record against a Division I opponent. . . . Southern's Avery Johnson tied an NCAA single-game record with 22 assists against Texas Southern in 1988. . . . Brigham Young's school-record 44-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Utah (79-75 in 2003). . . . East Carolina's Erroyl Bing (24 vs. South Florida in 2003), Kansas State's David Hall (27 vs. Oklahoma in 1971), Lamar's Steve Wade (27 vs. Oral Roberts in 1972), Oral Roberts' Eddie Woods (30 vs. Lamar in 1972) and Seton Hall's Nick Werkman (32 vs. Boston College in 1963) set school single-game rebounding records against a DI opponent. . . . The final 36 seconds of Ohio State's 50-44 win at Minnesota in 1972 were not played after a melee ensued following a flagrant foul on Buckeyes center Luke Witte as he attempted a layup. The Gophers, despite a pair of remainder-of-season suspensions, went on to capture the Big Ten Conference championship while OSU finished runner-up.
26 - Gonzaga's Frank Burgess (52 points vs. UC Davis in 1961) and Youngstown State's Tilman Bevely (55 vs. Tennessee Tech in 1987) set school Division I single-game scoring records. Bevely's output also tied Ohio Valley Conference record in league competition. . . . Arizona and Northern Arizona combined for an NCAA-record 130 free-throw attempts in 1953. . . . Herb Neff (36 vs. Georgia Tech in 1952) set Tennessee's single-game rebounding record.
27 - Georgia Southern's Johnny Mills (44 points vs. Samford in 1973), Indiana's Jimmy Rayl (56 vs. Minnesota in 1962), James Madison's Steve Stiepler (51 vs. Robert Morris in 1979), UNC Greensboro's Trevis Simpson (41 vs. Chattanooga in 2013) and West Texas State's Simmie Hill (42 at Texas Western in 1968) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Visiting New Mexico State overcame a 28-0 deficit to defeat Bradley in 1977. . . . Big Ten Conference perennial cellar dweller Northwestern upset Magic Johnson and NCAA Tournament champion-to-be Michigan State by 18 points in 1979 and Big Eight Conference sixth-place finisher Nebraska upset Danny Manning and NCAA playoff champion-to-be Kansas in 1988. . . . Centenary's Robert Parish (33 vs. Southern Mississippi in 1973) and Florida's Neal Walk (31 vs. Alabama in 1968) set school single-game rebounding records.
28 - Syracuse's Sherman Douglas tied an NCAA single-game record with 22 assists against Providence in 1989. . . . Jim Loscutoff of Oregon (32 vs. Brigham Young in 1955), Maurice Stokes of Saint Francis PA (39 vs. John Carroll OH in 1955) and Willie Naulls of UCLA (28 vs. Arizona State in 1956) set school single-game rebounding records. . . . Barney Cable (28 vs. Marquette in 1956) set Bradley's single-game rebounding record against a major-college opponent.
29 - Arkansas State's Jeff Clifton (43 points vs. Arkansas-Little Rock in 1994), Jacksonville's Ernie Fleming (59 vs. St. Peter's in 1972), Seton Hall's Nick Werkman (52 vs. Scranton PA in 1964), Utah Valley's Ryan Toolson (63 at Chicago State in quadruple overtime in 2009), Vermont's Eddie Benton (54 vs. Drexel in 1994) and Wagner's Terrance Bailey (49 vs. Brooklyn in triple overtime in 1986) set school Division I single-game scoring records. Benton's output is also an America East Conference record in league competition. . . . Big East Conference West Division cellar dweller Rutgers upset Carmelo Anthony and NCAA Tournament champion-to-be Syracuse in 2003. . . . Columbia's Jacob "Jack" Molinas (31 vs. Brown in 1953), North Carolina State's Ronnie Shavlik (35 vs. Villanova in 1955) and Penn State's Jesse Arnelle (27 vs. Temple in 1955) set school single-game rebounding records.
30 - Maryland-Eastern Shore's Tee Trotter (42 points at Howard in overtime in 2003), Mississippi's Johnny Neumann (63 at Louisiana State in 1971), New Orleans' Ledell Eackles (45 at Florida International in 1988), Seattle's Elgin Baylor (60 vs. Portland in 1958), Tennessee Tech's Kevin Murphy (50 vs. SIU-Edwardsville in 2012) and Western Kentucky's Clem Haskins (55 vs. Middle Tennessee State in 1965) set school Division I single-game scoring records. Haskins' output is also an Ohio Valley Conference record in league competition. . . . Rick Barry (51 vs. Oklahoma City in 1965) set Miami's single-game scoring record against a major-college opponent. . . . William & Mary ended West Virginia's Southern Conference-record 44-game winning streak in 1960. . . . UC Irvine's Kevin Magee (25 vs. Long Beach State in 1982), Miami's Rick Barry (29 vs. Oklahoma City in 1965) and Oklahoma State's Andy Hopson (27 vs. Missouri in 1973) set school single-game rebounding records.
31 - LSU's Pete Maravich, despite having 13 regular-season games remaining in 1970, passed Cincinnati's Oscar Robertson (2,973 points from 1957-58 through 1959-60) with 4:43 left against Mississippi to become the NCAA's career scoring leader. . . . Gerhard "Jerry" Varn (51 points vs. Piedmont GA in 1953) set The Citadel's single-game scoring record. . . . Holy Cross' Jim McCaffrey (46 vs. Iona in 1985) set MAAC scoring record in league competition. . . . Loyola Marymount outgunned U.S. International CA (181-150 in 1989) in the highest-scoring game in major-college history. . . . Manhattan's Bruce Seals established an NCAA single-game record with 27 three-point field-goal attempts (making nine vs. Canisius in 2000). . . . Canisius' Darren Fenn (22 vs. Manhattan in 2000), George Mason's Kenny Sanders (22 vs. American in 1989), Loyola Marymount's Hank Gathers (29 vs. U.S. International CA in 1989), Princeton's Carl Belz (29 vs. Rutgers in 1959) and St. Bonaventure's Bob Lanier (23 vs. Niagara in 1970) set school single-game rebounding records against a DI opponent.

Memorable Moments in December College Basketball History
Memorable Moments in November College Basketball History

In Memoriam: RIP Look at 2017 Deceased Who Impacted College Basketball

With Auld Lang Syne chords playing in the background, the final day of the calendar year offered another time to say goodbye by acknowledging the passing away in 2017 of a striking number of major-college basketball movers and shakers. The DI list includes All-Americans such as Tom Hawkins (Notre Dame), Dickie Hemric (Wake Forest), Darrall Imhoff (California), Jim McDaniels (Western Kentucky), Red Murrell (Drake), Ken Sears (Santa Clara) and Dave Stallworth (Wichita) plus NCAA Tournament championship coaches Jud Heathcote (Michigan State) and Rollie Massimino (Villanova).

A surprising number of the deceased former college hoopers were versatile athletes who went on to play at least eight seasons at the MLB level (Bob Cerv, Gene Conley, Dick Gernert, Jerry Kindall, Don Lock, Sam Mele and Gene Michael). Three Kentucky multiple-year All-SEC selections - Jerry Bird, Billy Ray Lickert and Bobby Watson - are among the following alphabetical list of deceased players and coaches who seldom dropped the ball on the court at midnight or any other time:

  • John Andariese, 78, played for Fordham under coach John Bach in late 1950s before serving as radio and TV broadcaster for the New York Knicks.
  • Orsten Artis, 74, averaged 12.6 ppg for Texas Western's all-black starting lineup winning 1966 NCAA Tournament championship game against Kentucky.
  • Markus Austin, 33, averaged 2.3 ppg and 3.6 rpg for Eastern Michigan from 2001-02 through 2004-05.
  • Jerry Bird, 83, averaged 12.7 ppg and 10.5 rpg for Kentucky from 1953-54 through 1955-56. Member of UK's undefeated squad as a sophomore and All-SEC second-team selection as a senior.
  • Frank Bogert, 94, sandwiched a stint in the Army Air Corps during WWII between seasons as Oklahoma A&M letterman under Hall of Fame coach Hank Iba.
  • Frank "Flash" Brian, 94, was a two-time All-SEC selection for Louisiana State in mid-1940s.
  • Frank Broyles, 92, was a three-time All-SEC second-team hoops selection for Georgia Tech in mid-1940s before compiling a 149-62-6 record in 20 seasons as head football coach for Missouri (1957) and Arkansas (1958 through 1976). Broyles guided 10 teams to bowl games, winning the AP and UPI national title in 1964.
  • Jeff Capel II, 64, coached North Carolina A&T (1993-94) and Old Dominion (1994-95) in NCAA Tournament in back-to-back years. He is the father of former ACC players and DI head coaches Jason Capel and Jeff Capel III.
  • Jay Carty, 75, led Oregon State in rebounding as a junior in 1960-61.
  • Bob Cerv, 91, ranked fourth on Nebraska's career scoring list in 1949-50 when finishing his hoops career before becoming a MLB outfielder for 12 seasons.
  • Bill Chambers, 86, stood a mere 6-4 when grabbing an NCAA-record 51 rebounds for William & Mary against Virginia on Valentine's Day in 1953.
  • Gene Conley, 86, was an All-Pacific Coast Conference first-team selection in 1949-50 when leading North Division in scoring as Washington State sophomore. He went on to become a MLB pitcher for 11 years.
  • Neil Fingleton, 36, averaged 2.7 ppg and 1.6 rpg for Holy Cross in 2002-03 and 2003-04 after 7-7 center transferred from North Carolina.
  • Dick Gernert, 89, was Temple hoops letterman in 1948-49 when averaging 2.7 ppg before becoming a MLB first baseman-outfielder for 11 years.
  • Gerry Gimelstob, 66, averaged 2 ppg for Rhode Island in 1970-71 and 1971-72 before coaching George Washington to a 58-55 record in four seasons from 1981-82 through 1984-85.
  • Frank Hamblen, 70, averaged 4 ppg and 1.3 rpg for Syracuse from 1966-67 through 1968-69 before becoming interim NBA head coach for the Milwaukee Bucks in 1991-92 and Los Angeles Lakers in 2004-05.
  • James Hardy III, 31, started three hoops games for Indiana in 2004-05 before playing wide receiver with the NFL's Buffalo Bills.
  • Connie Hawkins, 75, played for Iowa's freshman squad in 1960-61 before he was implicated in point-shaving scandal. While in high school, he reportedly associated with gambler Jack Molinas, who bought him a few meals and let him use his automobile.
  • Tom Hawkins, 80, averaged 23 ppg and 16.7 rpg for Notre Dame from 1956-57 through 1958-59. All-American as senior ranked among the nation's top 11 scorers and top 24 rebounders each of his last two seasons.
  • Lamar Heard, 55, was tri-captain of Georgia's 1983 Final Four squad as a senior, averaging 4.3 ppg, 3.8 rpg and 1.3 spg in his career. He set several school records for steals at the time.
  • George "Jud" Heathcote, 90, coached Montana and Michigan State to a 418-275 record in 24 seasons from 1971-72 through 1994-95, guiding the Spartans to 1979 NCAA Tournament title.
  • Ned "Dickie" Hemric, 83, was a two-time All-American who led Wake Forest in scoring and rebounding all four seasons from 1951-52 through 1954-55 while averaging 24.9 ppg and 17.3 rpg.
  • Zachary Hollywood, 19, was a Ball State redshirt found dead of apparent suicide at off-campus apartment.
  • Bill Hougland, 86, averaged 5.9 ppg and 3.8 rpg for Kansas from 1949-50 through 1951-52. As a senior, he was the Jayhawks' second-leading rebounder and third-leading scorer for NCAA Tournament titlist.
  • Darrall Imhoff, 78, was a two-time All-American who averaged 10 ppg and 9.5 rpg for California from 1957-58 through 1959-60. He was leading rebounder for 1959 NCAA playoff champion and 1960 national runner-up.
  • George Irvine, 69, was a two-time All-Pac-8 Conference selection who averaged 16.8 ppg and 7.3 rpg while shooting 55.8% from the floor for Washington from 1967-68 through 1969-70.
  • Ben Jobe, 84, coached Southern (La.) to a 208-142 record in 12 seasons (1986-87 through 1995-96, 2001-02 and 2002-03). Among his Jaguar players were Avery Johnson and Bobby Phills.
  • Steve "Snapper" Jones, 75, averaged 12.1 ppg and 7.3 rpg for Oregon from 1961-62 through 1963-64.
  • Toby Kimball, 74, averaged 18.4 ppg and 17.9 rpg for Connecticut from 1962-63 through 1964-65, leading the nation in rebounding as a senior with 21 rpg including a game against New Hampshire when he retrieved 34 missed shots.
  • Jerry Kindall, 82, averaged 6.9 ppg for Minnesota as a junior in 1955-56 before becoming a MLB infielder for nine years.
  • John Kundla, 101, coached Minnesota to a 110-105 record in nine seasons from 1959-60 through 1967-68.
  • David Lawrence, 58, was a two-time All-Southland Conference first-team selection who averaged 17.8 ppg and 9.4 rpg while shooting 55.3% from the floor for McNeese State from 1976-77 through 1979-80.
  • Billy Ray Lickert, 78, was a three-time All-SEC selection who averaged 14.7 ppg and 7.6 rpg for Kentucky from 1958-59 through 1960-61.
  • Don Lock, 81, averaged 6.8 ppg and 3.7 rpg for Wichita from 1955-56 through 1957-58, leading the Shockers in field-goal percentage his last two seasons. He went on to become a MLB outfielder for eight years.
  • Nick Mantis, 81, averaged 12.5 ppg and 4.8 rpg for Northwestern from 1956-57 through 1958-59. He was among the Wildcats' top four scorers all three seasons.
  • Rollie Massimino, 82, coached Villanova (1973-74 through 1991-92), UNLV (1992-93 and 1993-94) and Cleveland State (1996-97 through 2002-03) to 483-374 record in 28 seasons.
  • Jack McCloskey, 91, was Penn letterman in 1944 before coaching the Quakers (1956-57 through 1965-66) and Wake Forest (1966-67 through 1971-72) to 216-194 record in 16 seasons.
  • Jim McDaniels, 69, was a two-time All-American who averaged 27.6 ppg and 13.8 rpg for Western Kentucky from 1968-69 through 1970-71. He led WKU in scoring and rebounding all three seasons, including the Hilltoppers' third-place team in NCAA Tournament as a senior.
  • George McQuarn, 76, coached Cal State Fullerton to a 122-117 record in eight seasons from 1980-81 through 1987-88.
  • Sam Mele, 95, was NYU's leading scorer in 1943 NCAA playoffs before becoming a MLB outfielder for 10 years and managing the Minnesota Twins for seven campaigns.
  • Fab Melo, 26, averaged 4.9 ppg, 3.8 rpg and 1.8 bpg for Syracuse in 2010-11 and 2011-12 before leaving school early as an undergraduate for the NBA draft.
  • Gene Michael, 79, was Kent State's leading scorer with 14 ppg in 1957-58 before becoming a MLB shortstop for 10 years and manager of the New York Yankees and Chicago Cubs a total of four campaigns.
  • Rod Monroe, 40, averaged 3.9 ppg and 2.7 rpg for Cincinnati in 1995-96 and 1996-97 before competing as tight end for the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl XXXIII.
  • Phillip "Red" Murrell, averaged 22.7 ppg and 9.5 rpg for Drake from 1955-56 through 1957-58. He was an All-American as a senior when he ranked fifth in the nation in scoring with 26.7 ppg.
  • Newt Oliver, 93, coached Rio Grande (Ohio) in mid-1950s when one of his players was legendary scorer Bevo Francis.
  • Chuck "Ozzie" Orsborn, 99, coached Bradley to a 194-56 record in nine seasons from 1956-57 through 1964-65, directing his alma mater to three NIT titles (1957, 1960 and 1964).
  • Ara Parseghian, 94, was a hooper for Miami (Ohio) in 1946-47 and 1947-48 before becoming a College Football Hall of Fame coach compiling a 170-58-6 record with his alma mater (1951 through 1955), Northwestern (1956 through 1963) and Notre Dame (1964 through 1974). Guided the Fighting Irish to three national football titles (1964, 1966 and 1973).
  • Justin Reed, 35, was a three-time All-SEC selection who averaged 14.6 ppg and 6.3 rpg for Mississippi from 2000-01 through 2003-04.
  • Ken Sears, 83, averaged 14.9 ppg and 14.3 rpg for Santa Clara from 1951-52 through 1954-55. All-American as a senior when ranking among the nation's top 35 in scoring, FG% and FT%. He was the first basketball player on the cover of SI.
  • Charles Shackleford, 50, averaged 13.7 ppg and 7.8 rpg for North Carolina State from 1985-86 through 1987-88 before leaving college early for the NBA draft. He was an All-ACC first-team selection as a junior.
  • Lyle Smith, 101, was a guard on Idaho's hoops squad in the late 1930s under coach Forrest Twogood before piloting Boise JC to 1958 NJCAA football crown.
  • Dave Stallworth, 75, was a three-time All-American who averaged 24.3 ppg and 10.5 rpg while shooting 53.2% from the floor for Wichita from 1961-62 through 1964-65. He led the Shockers in scoring and rebounding his last three seasons while ranking among the nation's top 22 in scoring and FG% each year.
  • Harley "Skeeter" Swift, 70, was a three-time All-Ohio Valley Conference selection who averaged 18 ppg and 5.3 rpg for East Tennessee State from 1966-67 through 1968-69.
  • Roland "Fatty" Taylor, 71, averaged 9.3 ppg, 4.6 rpg and 3.3 apg for La Salle in 1967-68 and 1968-69.
  • Solly Walker, 85, averaged 7.8 ppg and 6.8 rpg for St. John's from 1951-52 through 1953-54. He was the first African-American ever to play at Kentucky.
  • Perry Wallace, 69, averaged 13 ppg and 11.5 rpg for Vanderbilt from 1967-68 through 1969-70. He was an all-league second-team selection as a senior. He became the first black varsity player in the all-white SEC before leading the Commodores in rebounding as a junior and scoring as a senior.
  • Bobby Watson, 86, was a two-time All-SEC first-team selection who averaged 10.4 ppg for Kentucky from 1949-50 through 1951-52. He was the third-leading scorer for UK's 1951 NCAA playoff titlist.
  • Glen Whisby, 45, was a three-time All-Metro Conference second-team selection who averaged 13.8 ppg, 8.7 rpg and 1.9 bpg for Southern Mississippi from 1991-92 through 1994-95.
  • Chris Williams, 36, was a three-time All-ACC selection who averaged 15.2 ppg, 6.6 rpg, 2.1 apg and 1.6 spg for Virginia from 1998-99 through 2001-02.
  • Glen Williams, 63, averaged 14.9 ppg and 4.9 rpg while shooting 51.9% from the floor for St. John's from 1973-74 through 1976-77. He led the team in scoring as a senior with 21.5 ppg.
  • Ryse Williams, 18, was a Loyola Marymount signee who died of cancer one day before his high school graduation.

The Classics: Hoyas and Terps Should Oppose Each Other Every Season

"Holy shadows of the dead, I am not to blame for your cruel and bitter fate, but the accursed rivalry which brought sister nations and brother people to fight one another. I do not feel happy for this victory of mine. On the contrary, I would be glad, brothers, if I had all of you standing here next to me, since we are united by the same language, the same blood and the same visions." - Alexander the Great

The best back-to-back non-conference games of the previous two seasons may have been when Maryland came from behind to upend Georgetown both times. Where was this rivalry for more than three decades and why aren't they dueling this campaign? We missed out on Patrick Ewing and David Wingate vs. Adrian Branch in the early 1980s, Reggie Williams vs. Len Bias in mid-1980s, Alonzo Mourning vs. Tony Massenburg and Walt Williams in late 1980s and early 1990s, Allen Iverson vs. Joe Smith in mid-1990s and Mike Sweetney vs. Juan Dixon at the turn of 21st Century. Instead of grand games giving us a shot of adrenalin, we got to overdose on cupcakes with the Hoyas and Terrapins combining to win all 66 of their mismatches against in-state weaklings UMBC, UMES, Morgan State and Towson from the early 1980s through 2003-04. It is time for both schools to commit to opposing each other like they did from 1946-47 to 1979-80. If so, the "Duel in D.C." immediately becomes annual must-see TV in pre-conference competition comparable to "Greatest Shows on Earth" such as Kentucky/Louisville, Illinois/Missouri and Cincinnati/Xavier.

Elsewhere, after 105 years steeped in history amid off-the-chart contempt, the rivalry between Kansas and Missouri expired for the foreseeable future when Mizzou departed the Big 12 Conference for the SEC. KU has a commanding edge in nearly every category (winning percentage, victories away from home and close games decided by single digits), but the Tigers have been enough of a tormentor to make the series as energetic and entertaining as you can find anywhere. Their border war stacked right up there with the more nationally-acclaimed "Clash of the Titans" between Duke and North Carolina.

Making about as much sense as Obamaland's delusional JV Syrian refugee policy treating possible terrorists like they're tourists in aftermath of deadly attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, it was shortsighted of KU and Mizzou to let their rivalry end. They simply join top six conference members DePaul/Illinois, Pittsburgh/West Virginia, Cincinnati/Ohio State and Texas/Texas A&M as potentially great natural non-league match-ups their fans haven't been able to enjoy on a regular basis. DePaul/Illini and Pitt/UWV confrontations occurred this season and need to continue.

Do we require self-absorbed former Secretary of State John Kerry to bring James Taylor for a "You've Got a Friend" sing-along to ease the stress after Utah cancelled its game at BYU? If bruised egos heal in the near future, perhaps sounder minds will prevail with Mizzou annually opposing KU in Kansas City much like it does in St. Louis against Illinois. But Mizzou can't complain if the Jayhawks continue to act like a jilted lover because the self-centered Tigers fail to oppose competent in-state foes such as Missouri State and Saint Louis.

By almost any measure including Alexander the Great's perspective, KU has a superior program to Mizzou, which is at its lowest ebb in more than 50 years after mess-maker Frank Haith left the Tigers' program in tatters. But Jayhawks coach Bill Self should rein in his rhetoric as the divorce dialogue intensified or at least take a crash course in college basketball history. When comparing the significance of the Kentucky/Louisville rivalry to the termination of KU's home-and-home conference conflicts with the Tigers, Self said: "Well, they've always played every year (out of league). That's all they know."

Well, Self needs to "always know" that UK and Louisville went 61 years from 1923 through 1983 without a regular-season matchup before they came to their senses and saw the light. Speaking of light, KU and Mizzou simply have to shed one lightweight apiece to keep a good thing going for the sport in general and for their fans specifically like the entertaining Philly Big 5. The two schools combined to raise $1.75 million for hurricane victims by playing an exhibition game in the fall of 2017. Why not surpass that feat via a regular-season confrontation? KU shouldn't also deny hoop fans a Top 20 match-up with Wichita State.

By toning down picking on patsies, there is plenty of room on their respective non-league schedules to keep playing each other. Ditto for Indiana and Kentucky plus Memphis and Tennessee resuming their rivalries, which would definitely be among the top 10 such confrontations in the country. If the century-old KU/Mizzou spectacle returns, it could immediately surpass Kentucky/Louisville and go atop the following list of the nation's top 25 non-conference rivalries if only because of longevity:

  1. Kentucky/Louisville
  2. Illinois/Missouri
  3. Cincinnati/Xavier
  4. Iowa/Iowa State
  5. Indiana/Notre Dame
  6. Brigham Young/Utah
  7. St. Joseph's/Villanova
  8. Georgia/Georgia Tech
  9. Florida/Florida State
  10. Marquette/Wisconsin
  11. Clemson/South Carolina
  12. New Mexico/New Mexico State
  13. Marshall/West Virginia
  14. Utah/Utah State
  15. Temple/Villanova
  16. La Salle/Villanova
  17. Florida/Miami (FL)
  18. Iowa/Northern Iowa
  19. Colorado/Colorado State
  20. Drake/Iowa
  21. Penn/Villanova
  22. Providence/Rhode Island
  23. Creighton/Nebraska
  24. La Salle/Temple
  25. Idaho/Idaho State

Centre Court: Little-Known Small College Handed Biggest Losses to UK and UL

It's no secret Rick Pitino, the biggest loser of 2017, coached both Kentucky and Louisville to NCAA Tournament championships. But following is a UK/UL connection hoop secret ESPN's best researcher doesn't know: Centre College in Danville, Ky., boasts a distinction possibly rendering Dickie V speechless insofar as the Colonels blew up both Death Stars - UK (87-17 in 1909-10) and UL (61-7 in 1919-20) - by more than 50 points, handing each perennial power its most lopsided defeat in history. The Cardinals lost five consecutive contests against Centre from 1939 to 1941 after the Wildcats dropped six straight decisions against Centre from 1918 to 1921.

If you need bar-bet winning information, additional major universities succumbing by staggering record-setting margins in the Dinosaur Age against obscure opponents include Bradley (bowed to Millikin), Cincinnati (Circleville), Connecticut (Wesleyan), Duke (Washington & Lee), Massachusetts (Williams), North Carolina (Lynchburg YMCA Elks), Oklahoma State (Southwestern KS), Pittsburgh (Westminster), Rhode Island (Amherst), USC (L.A. Athletic Club) and Wichita State (Ottawa).

The "Final Five" DI schools reaching the NCAA playoff national semifinals at some point in their careers to win at least 20 games in a major-college season when suffering their most-lopsided setback include Indiana (1993-94), Louisiana State (1969-70), St. John's (1951-52), Texas-El Paso (2000-01) and UCLA (1996-97). Kentucky was the opponent when Florida, Georgia, St. John's, Temple, Tennessee, Tennessee-Martin, Tulsa and Vanderbilt were saddled with their worst reversals.

IU's 106-56 loss against Minnesota in 1993-94 came only two years after the Big Ten Conference rivals reversed roles when the Hoosiers handed the Gophers their most-lopsided setback in history (96-50). In 1997-98, Missouri rebounded from the Tigers' most-lopsided reversal in school history (111-56 at Kansas State in Big 12 Conference opener) to defeat the Wildcats in their return engagement (89-59 at Mizzou in regular-season finale) for an incredible 85-point turnaround in margin.

Dr. James Naismith founded the game of basketball but he apparently didn't boast any "inside" information gaining a competitive edge. In fact, Naismith is the only one of Kansas' first nine full-season head coaches to compile a career losing record (55-60 in nine campaigns from 1898-99 through 1906-07). One of the defeats was by an all-time high 40 points against Nebraska.

Naismith is among the following coaches, including a striking number of luminaries (such as Harold Anderson, Gene Bartow, Ben Carnevale, Gale Catlett, Chick Davies, Bill Foster, Marv Harshman, Doggie Julian, Bob Knight, Guy Lewis, Rick Majerus, Phil Martelli, Frank McGuire, Shelby Metcalf, Lute Olson, Johnny Orr, Vadal Peterson, Digger Phelps, Honey Russell and Norm Stewart) incurring the most-lopsided loss in history for an NCAA Division I university (info unavailable for some DI schools listed alphabetically below):

Losing DI School Season Record Coach Victorious Opponent Score Margin
Air Force 1965-66 14-12 Bob Spear Utah 108-57 51
Alabama 1997-98 15-16 David Hobbs Auburn 94-40 54
Alabama State 1996-97 8-21 Rob Spivery Minnesota 114-34 80
American 1964-65 4-19 Jimmy Williams Syracuse 127-67 60
Appalachian State 1972-73 6-20 Press Maravich North Carolina State 130-53 77
Arizona 1955-56 11-15 Fred Enke Utah 119-45 74
Arizona State 1955-56 10-16 Bill Kajikawa Texas Tech 113-63 50
Arkansas 1973-74 10-16 Lanny Van Eman Mississippi 117-66 51
Army 1913-14 5-7 Joseph Stilwell Union 81-13 68
Auburn 1912-13 6-9 Mike Donahue Georgia 92-12 80
Austin Peay 1981-82 6-20 Ron Bargatze Clemson 102-53 49
Ball State 1946-47 9-8 Pete Phillips Notre Dame 80-31 49
Ball State 1987-88 14-14 Rick Majerus Purdue 96-47 49
Baylor 1944-45 0-17 Van Sweet Arkansas 94-28 66
Bethune-Cookman 1991-92 4-25 Jack "Cy" McClairen Arkansas 128-46 82
Boston College 1955-56 6-18 Don Martin Marshall 130-69 61
Boston University 1905-06 2-4 unavailable Wesleyan CT 74-7 67
Bowling Green 1954-55 6-16 Harold Anderson Dayton 109-38 71
Bradley 1913-14 10-10 Fred Brown Millikin IL 62-10 52
Brigham Young 1996-97 1-25 Roger Reid Washington 95-44 51
Brown 1988-89 7-19 Mike Cingiser Kansas 115-45 70
Butler 1954-55 10-14 Tony Hinkle Illinois 88-34 54
California 1999-00 18-15 Ben Braun Stanford 101-50 51
UC Irvine 1975-76 14-12 Tim Tift UNLV 129-57 72
UC Santa Barbara 1966-67 10-16 Ralph Barkey UCLA 119-75 44
UC Santa Barbara 1976-77 8-18 Ralph Barkey UNLV 113-69 44
Cal State Fullerton 1964-65 1-25 Alex Omalev U.S. International 91-32 59
Campbell 1997-98 10-17 Billy Lee Florida International 96-43 53
Centenary 1987-88 13-15 Tommy Canterbury Oklahoma 152-84 68
Central Connecticut State 1995-96 13-15 Mark Adams Connecticut 116-46 70
Central Michigan 1911-12 2-5 Harry Helmer Michigan State 72-10 62
Cincinnati 1901-02 5-4 Henry S. Pratt Circleville OH 84-13 71
Clemson 1954-55 2-21 Banks McFadden Duke 115-54 61
Colorado 1951-52 8-16 Horace "Bebe" Lee Kansas State 92-40 52
Connecticut 1905-06 6-3 unofficial Wesleyan CT 86-12 74
Creighton 1948-49 9-14 Duce Belford Illinois 96-30 66
Dartmouth 1966-67 7-17 Alvin "Doggie" Julian Princeton 116-42 74
Davidson 1908-09 1-3 J.W. Rhea Georgia 100-12 88
Dayton 1994-95 7-20 Oliver Purnell Cincinnati 116-63 53
DePaul 2010-11 7-24 Oliver Purnell Syracuse 107-59 48
Detroit 2015-16 16-15 Ray McCallum Vanderbilt 102-52 50
Drake 1998-99 10-17 Kurt Kanaskie Indiana 102-46 56
Duke 1912-13 11-8 J.E. Brinn Washington & Lee VA 90-15 75
Duquesne 1937-38 6-11 Charles "Chick" Davies Stanford 92-27 65
East Carolina 1963-64 9-15 Wendell Carr Davidson 105-45 60
East Tennessee State 1996-97 7-20 Ed DeChellis Davidson 97-47 50
East Tennessee State 2007-08 19-13 Murry Bartow Syracuse 125-75 50
Eastern Illinois 2001-02 15-16 Rick Samuels Oklahoma 109-50 59
Eastern Michigan 1957-58 1-20 James Skala Southern Illinois 128-60 68
Evansville 1960-61 11-16 Arad McCutchan Utah 132-77 55
Fairfield 2014-15 7-24 Sydney Johnson Duke 109-59 50
Florida 1947-48 15-10 Sam McAllister Kentucky 87-31 56
Florida A&M 1992-93 10-18 Willie Booker Oklahoma 146-65 81
Florida Atlantic 2000-01 7-24 Sidney Green Florida 100-42 58
Florida International 1989-90 7-21 Rich Walker Ball State 105-50 55
Florida State 1957-58 9-16 J.K. "Bud" Kennedy West Virginia 103-51 52
Fordham 1908-09 17-12 Chris Mahoney Williams MA 77-12 65
George Mason 1970-71 9-17 John Linn Randolph-Macon VA 118-36 82
George Washington 1961-62 9-15 Bill Reinhart West Virginia 120-68 52
Georgetown 1912-13 11-5 James Colliflower Navy 67-18 49
Georgia 1955-56 3-21 Harbin Lawson Kentucky 143-66 77
Georgia State 1994-95 11-17 Carter Wilson Memphis State 124-52 72
Georgia Tech 1908-09 1-6 John Heisman Georgia 78-9 69
Gonzaga 1945-46 6-14 Gordon White Montana 103-34 69
Grambling State 1999-00 1-30 Larry Wright Louisiana State 112-37 75
Harvard 1989-90 12-14 Peter Roby Duke 130-54 76
Hawaii 1965-66 0-18 Ephraim "Red" Rocha Washington 111-52 59
Hofstra 1944-45 8-13 Jack Smith USMMA 66-15 51
Holy Cross 1901-02 4-5 Fred Powers Dartmouth 78-27 51
Houston 1975-76 17-11 Guy Lewis Arkansas 92-47 45
Howard 2000-01 10-18 Frankie Allen Memphis 112-42 70
Idaho 1976-77 5-21 Jim Jarvis UNLV 135-78 57
Idaho State 1992-93 10-18 Herb Williams Oklahoma 112-59 53
Illinois 1973-74 5-18 Harv Schmidt Indiana 107-67 40
Illinois State 1958-59 24-4 James Collie Tennessee State 131-74 57
Indiana 1993-94 21-9 Bob Knight Minnesota 106-56 50
Indiana State 1910-11 2-8 John P. Kimmel Purdue 112-6 106
Iona 1967-68 13-9 Jim McDermott Duquesne 100-47 53
Iowa 1974-75 10-16 Lute Olson Indiana 102-49 53
Iowa State 1989-90 10-18 Johnny Orr Indiana 115-66 49
Jacksonville 2017-18 TBD Tony Jasick North Carolina State 116-64 52
James Madison 1977-78 18-8 Lou Campanelli Utah State 102-66 36
Kansas 1899-00 3-4 Dr. James Naismith Nebraska 48-8 40
Kansas State 1945-46 4-20 Fritz Knorr Marshall 88-42 46
Kentucky 1909-10 4-8 R.E. Spahr/E.R. Sweetland Centre KY 87-17 70
Lafayette 1994-95 2-25 John Leone Connecticut 110-48 62
Lamar 1963-64 19-6 Jack Martin St. Louis 113-63 50
La Salle 2015-16 9-22 John Giannini Miami (Fla.) 95-49 46
Lehigh 1901-02 9-5 J.W. Pollard Bucknell 68-3 65
Long Beach State 1990-91 11-17 Seth Greenberg UNLV 114-63 51
Long Island 1998-99 10-17 Ray Martin Florida 119-61 58
Louisiana-Monroe 1997-98 13-16 Mike Vining Xavier 118-61 57
Louisiana State 1969-70 22-10 Press Maravich UCLA 133-84 49
Louisiana Tech 1974-75 12-13 Emmett Hendricks Tulane 88-40 48
Louisville 1919-20 6-5 Tuley Brucker Centre KY 61-7 54
Loyola of Chicago 1916-17 1-3 unavailable Whiting Owls 91-21 70
Loyola Marymount 1990-91 16-15 Jay Hillock Oklahoma 172-112 60
Maine 1973-74 13-10 Tom "Skip" Chappelle Massachusetts 108-38 70
Manhattan 1985-86 2-26 Thomas Sullivan North Carolina 129-45 84
Marquette 2004-05 19-12 Tom Crean Louisville 99-52 47
Marshall 1913-14 2-6 Boyd Chambers Cincinnati Church of Christ 68-10 58
Maryland 1943-44 4-14 H. Burton Shipley Army 85-22 63
Massachusetts 1907-08 4-11 unofficial Williams MA 60-3 57
Memphis 1927-28 10-11 Zach Curlin Elks Club 79-30 49
Miami (Fla.) 1969-70 9-17 Ron Godfrey UCLA 127-69 58
Miami (Ohio) 1948-49 8-13 Blue Foster Cincinnati 94-36 58
Michigan 1999-00 15-14 Brian Ellerbe Michigan State 114-63 51
Michigan State 1974-75 17-9 Gus Ganakas Indiana 107-55 52
Middle Tennessee State 1954-55 11-16 Charles Greer Morehead State 123-68 55
Milwaukee 1962-63 4-17 Russ Rebholz Loyola of Chicago 107-47 60
Minnesota 1991-92 16-16 Clem Haskins Indiana 96-50 46
Mississippi 1913-14 8-7 B.Y. Walton Mississippi State 84-18 66
Mississippi State 1992-93 13-16 Richard Williams Arkansas 115-58 57
Missouri 1997-98 17-15 Norm Stewart Kansas State 111-56 55
Missouri State 1980-81 9-21 Bob Cleeland Puget Sound WA 103-50 53
Morehead State 1992-93 6-21 Dick Fick Michigan State 121-53 68
Murray State 1960-61 13-10 Cal Luther St. Bonaventure 92-39 53
Navy 1963-64 10-12 Ben Carnevale Duke 121-65 56
Nebraska 1957-58 10-13 Jerry Bush Kansas 102-46 56
Nevada 1990-91 17-14 Len Stevens UNLV 131-81 50
New Mexico 1954-55 7-17 Woody Clements UCLA 106-41 65
New Orleans 2013-14 11-15 Mark Slessinger Michigan State 101-48 53
NYU 1912-13 1-11 James Dale Navy 74-13 61
Niagara 1996-97 11-17 Jack Armstrong Kansas 134-73 61
Nicholls State 2002-03 3-25 Ricky Blanton Texas Tech 107-35 72
North Carolina 1914-15 6-10 Charles Doak Lynchburg YMCA Elks 63-20 43
UNC Asheville 1997-98 19-9 Eddie Biedenbach Maryland 110-52 58
North Carolina A&T 1976-77 3-24 Warren Reynolds North Carolina State 107-46 61
North Carolina State 1920-21 6-14 Richard Crozier North Carolina 62-10 52
UNC Wilmington 1996-97 16-14 Jerry Wainwright Villanova 87-38 49
North Texas 1998-99 4-22 Vic Trilli Maryland 132-57 75
Northern Arizona 1991-92 7-20 Harold Merritt Louisiana State 159-86 73
Northern Illinois 1966-67 8-12 Tom Jorgensen Bradley 117-66 51
Northern Iowa 1906-07 5-4 R.F. Seymour Iowa 73-16 57
Northwestern 1986-87 7-21 Bill E. Foster Duke 106-55 51
Northwestern State 2000-01 19-13 Mike McConathy Arkansas 115-47 68
Notre Dame 1971-72 6-20 Digger Phelps Indiana 94-29 65
Ohio 1902-03 TBD unavailable Ohio State 88-2 86
Ohio State 1955-56 16-6 Floyd Stahl Illinois 111-64 47
Oklahoma 1916-17 13-8 Bennie Owen Oklahoma A&M 58-11 47
Oklahoma State 1919-20 1-12 James Pixlee Southwestern KS 53-9 44
Oral Roberts 1992-93 5-22 Ken Trickey Kansas 140-72 68
Oregon 1921-22 7-24 George Bohler Washington 76-15 61
Oregon State 1996-97 7-20 Eddie Payne Arizona 99-48 51
Oregon State 2009-10 14-18 Craig Robinson Seattle 99-48 51
Pacific 1952-53 2-20 Van Sweet California 87-30 57
Penn 1987-88 10-16 Tom Schneider UCLA 98-49 49
Penn State 1985-86 12-17 Bruce Parkhill Navy 103-50 53
Pepperdine 1965-66 2-24 Robert "Duck" Dowell Iowa 111-50 61
Pittsburgh 1905-06 2-9 Benjamin Printz Westminster PA 106-13 93
Portland 1966-67 10-16 Al Negratti UCLA 122-57 65
Portland State 1964-65 8-18 Loyal "Sharkey" Nelson Montana State 97-43 54
Prairie View 1995-96 4-23 Elwood Plummer Tulsa 141-50 91
Princeton 1908-09 8-13 Harry Shorter Penn 55-10 45
Providence 1954-55 9-12 Vin Cuddy Holy Cross 101-47 54
Purdue 1947-48 11-9 Mel Taube Illinois 98-54 44
Rhode Island 1916-17 2-6 Jim Baldwin Amherst MA 65-5 60
Rice 1971-72 6-20 Don Knodel North Carolina 127-69 58
Rider 1989-90 10-18 Kevin Bannon Minnesota 116-48 68
Robert Morris 1996-97 4-23 Jim Boone Arizona 118-54 64
Rutgers 1906-07 0-3 Frank Gorton Lehigh 88-23 65
St. Francis (N.Y.) 1993-94 1-26 Ron Ganulin Providence 108-48 60
St. John's 1951-52 25-6 Frank McGuire Kentucky 81-40 41
St. John's 2015-16 8-24 Chris Mullin Creighton 100-59 41
St. John's 2016-17 14-19 Chris Mullin Villanova 108-67 41
Saint Joseph's 2014-15 13-18 Phil Martelli Gonzaga 94-42 52
Saint Louis 1945-46 13-11 John Flanigan Oklahoma A&M 86-33 53
Saint Mary's 2000-01 2-27 Dave Bollwinkel Arizona 101-41 60
Saint Peter's 1941-42 5-11 Morgan Sweetman St. Francis (N.Y.) 85-29 56
Sam Houston State 1991-92 2-25 Jerry Hopkins Lamar 126-57 69
Samford 1957-58 7-17 Virgil Ledbetter Alabama 105-44 61
San Diego State 1998-99 4-22 Fred Trenkle Utah 86-38 48
San Jose State 1970-71 2-24 Danny Glines New Mexico State 114-55 59
Santa Clara 2001-02 13-15 Dick Davey Ohio State 88-41 47
Seton Hall 1957-58 7-19 John "Honey" Russell Cincinnati 118-54 64
Siena 1987-88 23-6 Mike Deane Syracuse 123-72 51
South Alabama 1994-95 9-18 Ronnie Arrow Southern Utah 140-72 68
South Carolina 1929-30 6-10 A.W. "Rock" Norman Furman 70-11 59
South Florida 1987-88 6-22 Bobby Paschal Syracuse 111-65 46
Southeastern Louisiana 1998-99 6-20 John Lyles Auburn 114-60 54
Southern California 1913-14 5-7 unavailable L.A. Athletic Club 77-14 63
Southern Illinois 2016-17 17-16 Barry Hinson Wichita State 87-45 42
Southern Methodist 1980-81 7-20 Dave Bliss Arkansas 92-50 42
Southern Mississippi 2001-02 10-17 James Green Cincinnati 89-37 52
Southern Utah 1988-89 10-18 Neil Roberts Oklahoma 132-64 68
Stanford 1975-76 11-16 Dick DiBiaso UCLA 120-74 46
Stetson 1993-94 14-15 Dan Hipsher Florida 90-44 46
Syracuse 1961-62 8-13 Fred Lewis NYU 122-59 63
Temple 1946-47 8-12 Josh Cody Kentucky 68-29 39
Tennessee 1992-93 13-17 Wade Houston Kentucky 101-40 61
Tennessee-Martin 1994-95 7-20 Cal Luther Kentucky 124-50 74
Tennessee Tech 1962-63 16-8 John Oldham Loyola of Chicago 111-42 69
Texas 1971-72 19-9 Leon Black UCLA 115-65 50
Texas A&M 1971-72 16-10 Shelby Metcalf UCLA 117-53 64
Texas-Arlington 1993-94 7-22 Eddie McCarter Iowa State 119-55 64
Texas Christian 1977-78 4-22 Tim Somerville Clemson 125-62 63
Texas-El Paso 2000-01 23-9 Jason Rabedeaux Fresno State 108-56 52
Texas-San Antonio 2015-16 5-27 Brooks Thompson Texas 116-50 66
Texas Southern 1993-94 19-11 Robert Moreland Arkansas 129-63 66
Texas State 1918-19 TBD unavailable Texas 89-6 83
Texas Tech 2007-08 16-15 Pat Knight Kansas 109-51 58
Toledo 1932-33 3-13 Dave Connelly Ohio State 64-10 54
Tulane 2000-01 9-21 Shawn Finney Cincinnati 105-57 48
Tulsa 1947-48 7-16 John Garrison Kentucky 72-18 54
UAB 1990-91 18-13 Gene Bartow UNLV 109-68 41
UCF 1988-89 7-20 Phil Carter Florida State 133-79 54
UCLA 1996-97 24-8 Steve Lavin Stanford 109-61 48
UNLV 1970-71 16-10 John Bayer Houston 130-73 57
U.S. International 1989-90 12-16 Gary Zarecky Oklahoma 173-101 72
Utah 2011-12 6-25 Larry Krystkowiak Oregon 94-48 46
Utah State 1909-10 3-7 Clayton Teetzel Utah 69-15 54
Utah State 1925-26 13-5 Lowell Romney Southern California 82-28 54
Valparaiso 1967-68 11-15 Gene Bartow Houston 158-81 77
Vanderbilt 1946-47 7-8 Norm Cooper Kentucky 98-29 69
Villanova 1921-22 11-4 Michael Saxe Army 58-11 47
Virginia 1964-65 7-18 Bill Gibson Duke 136-72 64
Virginia Commonwealth 1976-77 13-13 Dana Kirk Auburn 109-59 50
Virginia Tech 1952-53 4-19 Gerald "Red" Laird Marshall 113-57 56
Wagner 1998-99 9-18 Tim Capstraw Connecticut 111-46 65
Wake Forest 1913-14 10-7 J.R. Crozier Virginia 80-16 64
Washington 1988-89 12-16 Andy Russo Arizona 116-61 55
Washington State 1964-65 9-17 Marv Harshman UCLA 93-41 52
Washington State 2004-05 12-16 Dick Bennett Oklahoma State 81-29 52
Weber State 1988-89 17-11 Denny Huston Akron 92-50 42
West Virginia 1978-79 16-12 Gale Catlett Louisville 106-60 46
Western Carolina 1998-99 8-21 Phil Hopkins Maryland 113-46 67
Western Kentucky 1990-91 14-14 Ralph Willard Georgia 124-65 59
Western Michigan 1988-89 12-16 Vern Payne Michigan 107-60 47
Wichita State 1912-13 1-11 E.V. Long Ottawa KS 80-8 72
William & Mary 1918-19 3-6 V.M. Geddy Roanoke VA 87-6 81
Wisconsin 1975-76 10-16 John Powless Indiana 114-61 53
Wisconsin 1985-86 12-16 Steve Yoder Iowa 101-48 53
Wright State 1976-77 11-16 Marcus Jackson Cincinnati 120-52 68
Wyoming 1910-11 1-4 Harold Dean Colorado 65-12 53
Xavier 1966-67 13-13 Don Ruberg Kansas 100-52 48
Yale 1976-77 6-20 Ray Carazo Clemson 104-50 54
Youngstown State 1941-42 9-12 Dom Rosselli Toledo 88-32 56

Changing in Midstream: What's Ahead for ECU, Charlotte and UTEP?

What happens to a team when a coach doesn't last half a season such as at Charlotte (Mark Price), East Carolina (Jeff Lebo) and Texas-El Paso (Tim Floyd)? A total of 29 schools in the previous 21 seasons had a coach relieved of his duties, retire or pass away after the start of the season but before the second half of the campaign. Two years ago, Wisconsin's Greg Gard (15-8) became only the eighth "successor" coach piloting a club more than half of a campaign since the NCAA playoffs expanded to at least 64 entrants in 1985 to post a winning record the remainder of the season. He joined Jeff Dittman (10-8 with Sam Houston State in 1988-89), Dave Fehte (9-8 with Saint Mary's in 1990-91), Max Good (13-9 with UNLV in 2000-01), Ray Harper (11-8 with Western Kentucky in 2011-12), Mike Perry (10-9 with Georgia State in 2002-03), Brad Soderberg (16-10 with Wisconsin in 2000-01) and Derek Waugh (14-8 with Stetson in 2000-01). Gard, Harper and Soderberg guided the squads they inherited to an NCAA playoff berth.

At the power-conference level, John Brady (Louisiana State in 2007-08), Lou Campanelli (California in 1992-93), Gale Catlett (West Virginia in 2001-02), Jim Dutcher (Minnesota in 1985-86), Dennis Felton (Georgia in 2008-09), Larry Glass (Northwestern in 1968-69), Mark Gottfried (Alabama in 2008-09), Joe Harrington (Colorado in 1995-96), Bob Knight (Texas Tech in 2007-08), Ward "Piggy" Lambert (Purdue in 1945-46), Shelby Metcalf (Texas A&M in 1989-90), Kevin O'Neill (Southern California in 2012-13), Charlie Parker (Southern California in 1995-96), Steve Patterson (Arizona State in 1988-89) and Quin Snyder (Missouri in 2005-06) comprise the list of coaches who lasted more than half of a specific season before their tenures ended for one reason or another.

Following is an alphabetical list of universities in the pre-midseason coaching turnover category since the start of national postseason competition and the records of their coaches that season:

Division I School Season Successor/Interim (Record) Departing Coach (Record)
Appalachian State 1974-75 Russ Bergman (2-12) Peter "Press" Maravich (1-11)
Boise State 1972-73 Doran "Bus" Connor (6-7) Murray Satterfield (5-8)
Brigham Young 1996-97 Tony Ingle (1-25) Roger Reid (1-6)
Buffalo 1999-00 Reggie Witherspoon (3-20) Tim Cohane (2-3)
Cal Poly 2000-01 Kevin Bromley (3-12) Jeff Schneider (5-7)
Centenary 1977-78 Tommy Canterbury (6-9) Riley Wallace (4-8)
Central Connecticut State 1987-88 C.J. Jones (8-15) Bill Detrick (2-3)
Chicago State 1996-97 Phil Gary (4-17) Craig Hodges (0-6)
The Citadel 1939-40 Ben Parker (4-5) Absalon "Rock" Norman (4-4)
Colgate 1997-98 Paul Aiello (10-12) Jack Bruen (0-6)
Connecticut 1946-47 Hugh Greer (12-0) Blair Gullion (4-2)
Connecticut 1962-63 George Wigton (11-4) Hugh Greer (7-3)
Dartmouth 1966-67 Dave Gavitt (2-15) Alvin "Doggie" Julian (5-2)
Dartmouth 2009-10 Mark Graupe (2-13) Terry Dunn (3-10)
Denver 1948-49 Hoyt Brawner (11-6) Ellison Ketchum (6-9)
DePaul 2009-10 Tracy Webster (1-15) Jerry Wainwright (7-8)
Detroit 1987-88 John Mulroy (7-20) Don Sicko (0-3)
Detroit 2007-08 Kevin Mondro (3-13) Perry Watson (4-10)
Eastern Kentucky 1961-62 Jim Baechtold (6-3) Paul McBrayer (4-3)
Eastern Michigan 1985-86 Ben Braun (5-10) Jim Boyce (4-8)
Fordham 2009-10 Jared Grasso (1-22) Dereck Whittenburg (1-4)
Georgetown 1998-99 Craig Esherick (8-10) John Thompson Jr. (7-6)
Georgia State 1984-85 Mark Slonaker (1-24) Tom Pugliese (1-2)
Georgia State 2002-03 Mike Perry (10-9) Charles "Lefty" Driesell (4-6)
Howard 1999-00 Billy Coward (1-18) Kirk Saulny (0-9)
Idaho State 1967-68 Dan Miller (10-12) Claude Retherford (3-1)
Idaho State 2011-12 Deane Martin (7-13) Joe O'Brien (2-8)
Iowa 1949-50 Frank "Bucky" O'Connor (6-5) Lawrence "Pops" Harrison (9-2)
Jacksonville 1996-97 Buster Harvey (5-17) George Scholz (0-6)
Kent State 1977-78 Mike Boyd (5-11) Rex Hughes (1-10)
Long Island 2001-02 Ron Brown (5-13) Ray Martin (0-9)
Louisville 1970-71 Howard Stacey (12-8) John Dromo (8-1)
Monmouth 1986-87 Ron Krayl (7-13) Ron Kornegay (1-6)
UNC Greensboro 2011-12 Wes Miller (11-11) Mike Dement (2-8)
North Carolina State 1964-65 Peter "Press" Maravich (20-4) Everett Case (1-1)
Northern Illinois 2000-01 Andy Greer (4-16) Brian Hammel (1-6)
Oral Roberts 1982-83 Dick Acres (11-9) Ken Hayes (3-5)
Penn 2009-10 Jerome Allen (6-15) Glen Miller (0-7)
Princeton 1944-45 Leonard Hattinger (5-8) William Logan (2-4)
Princeton 1960-61 Jake McCandless (9-6) Franklin "Cappy" Cappon (9-2)
St. John's 2003-04 Kevin Clark (4-17) Mike Jarvis (2-4)
Saint Mary's 1990-91 Dave Fehte (9-8) Paul Landreaux (4-9)
Sam Houston State 1988-89 Jeff Dittman (10-8) Gary Moss (2-8)
San Francisco 1970-71 Bob Gaillard (10-12) Phil Vukicevich (0-4)
San Francisco 2007-08 Eddie Sutton (6-13) Jessie Evans (4-8)
South Alabama 1994-95 Judas Prada (8-15) Ronnie Arrow (1-3)
South Carolina 1942-43 Rex Enright (10-6) Frank Johnson (2-0)
South Florida 1979-80 Gordon Gibbons (2-13) Hunter "Chip" Conner (4-8)
Southeast Missouri State 2008-09 Zac Roman (0-18) Scott Edgar (3-9)
Southeastern Louisiana 1987-88 Leo McClure (4-12) Newton Chelette (3-9)
Southern California 2004-05 Jim Saia (11-15) Henry Bibby (2-2)
Stetson 2000-01 Derek Waugh (14-8) Murray Arnold (4-4)
Tennessee State 1984-85 Ed Meyers (6-13) Ed Martin (3-6)
Tennessee State 2002-03 Hosea Lewis/Teresa Phillips (0-20) Nolan Richardson III (2-5)
Tennessee Tech 1988-89 Frank Harrell (8-17) Tom Deaton (2-3)
Tulsa 2004-05 Alvin "Pooh" Williamson (7-15) John Phillips (2-5)
UNLV 2000-01 Max Good (13-9) Bill Bayno (3-4)
Western Kentucky 2011-12 Ray Harper (11-8) Ken McDonald (5-11)
Wisconsin 2000-01 Brad Soderberg (16-10) Dick Bennett (2-1)
Wisconsin 2015-16 Greg Gard (15-8) William "Bo" Ryan (7-5)

Holiday Wish List: College Hoops' Christmas Gifts and Stocking Stuffers

It's the most wonderful time of the year, but holiday festivities can go awry between Christmas and New Year's Eve. In ghosts of Christmas' past, just ask top-ranked Virginia, which lost at tiny Chaminade in 1982, and NCAA champion-to-be Michigan, which bowed to Alaska-Anchorage on a neutral court in 1988.

Amid the bone-chilling cold celebrations as liberals want us to cower in corner because of global warming while freezing our butts off, a Christmas holiday week absolutely can not go by without the time-honored tradition of making a list and checking it twice. For instance, many observers are thankful national health-care costs for eye and ear care are dramatically decreased from looking at and listening to Melania and Ivanka rather than #ShrillaryRotten and Chelsea. The college basketball wish list, a stocking stuffer distinguishing between the naughty and nice, doesn't change much from the previous month at Thanksgiving or next week among New Year Resolutions. Opting out from responding to apology demands, some of them may fall in the Christmas Miracle category but following is a healthy serving of food-for-thought wishes presented to college hoop observers:

  • Wish peace and comfort to family and friends of striking number of former All-American players and prominent coaches who passed away this year.

  • Wish deserving mid-major players earn All-American acclaim this season.

  • Wish ex-college hoopers continued success as prominent NFL tight ends.

  • Wish fans understand how good the Big East Conference first division is after league upheaval several years ago.

  • Wish special seasons for standout seniors because they didn't abandon college hoops early and give the sport at least some modicum of veteran leadership.

  • Wish the best for the Ivy League and Patriot League, which seem like the last bastions replete with textbook student-athletes. Five Ivy League institutions - Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard and Yale - can still hold their heads high despite each of them posting all-time losing records.

  • Wish proper acclaim for pristine playmakers who show again and again that "pass" is not a dirty four-letter word amid the obsession with individualistic one-on-one moves by self-absorbed one-and-done scholars.

  • Wish many highlights for entertaining little big men (players 5-10 or shorter) who inspire us with their self-confidence and mental toughness in the Land of the Giants.

  • Wish junior college players and foreigners could overcome perceptions in some misguided quarters that they are the rogues of recruiting.

  • Wish patience for the numerous promising first-year coaches assuming control of programs this season. They need to remember the fortitude exhibited by many of the biggest names in coaching who rebounded from embarrassing defeats in their first season as a head coach. An active luminary who lost multiple games to non-Division I colleges in his initial campaign before ascending to stardom as the all-time winningest coach is Duke's Mike Krzyzewski (lost to SUNY-Buffalo, Scranton and King's College in 1975-76 while coaching Army).

  • Wish Division I schools will soon find their bearings amid the chaotic restructuring of conferences forsaking tradition although the quest for mega-leagues could be delusional because they're vying for television revenue that might not exist.

  • Wish more accuracy for recruiting services incapable of discerning multiple recent national player of the year honorees should have been ranked higher. Ditto to announcers who infect the sport by spreading this virus without ever seeing any of the players enough to properly evaluate them.

  • Wish marquee coaches wouldn't serve up assistants as sacrificial lambs resembling Grinch when the heat of an investigation of their program intensifies. This practice really got out of hand when the FBI was involved.

  • Wish prominent programs would reduce, if not eliminate, academic exceptions. Of course, the quality of play will diminish by emphasizing textbook student-athletes but it's not as if half of the non-league games on TV aren't mismatches, anyway.

  • Wish wisdom for anyone who incessantly castigates the majority of undergraduates declaring early for the NBA draft. Before accepting the party line that many of the players are making monumental mistakes by forgoing their remaining college eligibility, remember that more than half of the NBA's All-Pro selections in the last quarter century or so left college early or never attended a university.

  • Wish a heart for any school not promptly granting a recruit seeking to enroll elsewhere a release from its letter-of-intent when he wants to attend another institution for legitimate reasons.

  • Wish jaws wired shut for "Me Generation" showmen and "trippers" who've failed to comprehend their respective teams don't benefit on the court from a trash-talking Harlem Globetrotter routine.

  • Wish self-absorbed players will finally see the light and spend less time getting tattoos and practicing macho dunks and more on team beneficial free throws. It all hinges on dedication. There is a reason they're supposed to be "free" throws instead of Shaq-like "foul" shots.

  • Wish high-profile coaches would show more allegiance rather than taking off for greener pastures despite having multiple years remaining on their contract. Also wish said pacts didn't include bonus for graduation ratio or GPA insofar as many coaches become Sgt. "I Know Nothing" Schultz whenever academic anemia issues surface.

  • Wish network analysts would refrain from serving as apologists for the coaching community. When their familiar spiels echo throughout hoopdom, they become nothing more than the big mouths that bore.

  • Wish marquee schools will vow to stop forsaking entertaining non-conference games with natural rivals while scheduling a half-dozen or more meaningless "rout-a-matics" at home. Aren't two or three gimmes enough?

  • Wish a generous dose of ethics to defrauding coaches who manipulate junior colleges and high schools into giving phony grades. Ditto coaches who steer prize high school prospects to third parties toying with standardized test results.

  • Wish authenticity for those "fatherly-advice" coaches who don't mandate that any player with pro potential take multiple financial literacy courses. Did they notice in recent years that products from Alabama, Georgia Tech, Georgetown, Kentucky and Syracuse filed for bankruptcy after combining for more than half a billion dollars in salaries over their NBA careers? What kind of classes are taken in college anyway if a staggering 60% of NBA players file for bankruptcy five years after retirement? There's personal responsibility, but shouldn't the universities they attended feel some sort of culpability? And don't you wish most agents would become extinct if such a high percentage of pros end up with holes in their pockets?

  • Wish overzealous fans will stop flogging freshmen for not living up to their high school press clippings right away. The impatient onlookers need to get a grip on themselves.

  • Wish many of the excessive number of small schools with visions of sugar plums dancing in their heads, thinking they can compete at the Division I level, would return to DII or DIII. There are far too many examples of dreamy-eyed small schools that believe competing with the big boys will get them national recognition, make big bucks from the NCAA Tournament and put the institutions on the map. They don't know how unrealistic that goal is until most of the hyphenated and directional schools barnstorm the country during their non-conference schedules in college basketball versions of Bataan Death Marches.

  • Wish lapdog-lazy media outworked by Louisville Escort Queen and Duke student newspaper would display more energy exhibiting enterprising analysis. Why do almost all of the principal college basketball websites "progressively" look and read virtually the same? It's a byproduct of predictably pathetic press needing a jolt of adversarial reporting.

  • Wish coaches would "shut up and sing" rather than weigh in with opinions on restroom access, let alone POTUS pap criticism offered principally to appease their player pipeline of 90%-plus leftists.

  • Wish ESPN, failing to acknowledge significant reduction in subscribers stems from #KneelWithJemele liberalism being a mental disorder, would cease becoming BSPN by giving politically-correct forums to leftist lunatics such as Howard Bryant and "experts" who either lie to NCAA investigators as a coach, drop their pants for locker-room motivation, get fired for intoxication, participate as agent in funneling funds to regal recruit, can't quite figure out Dell Curry's sons could also be All-Americans and practice reprehensible race-baiting with the intellectually-bankrupt "Uncle Tom" bomb. If not, Extra Sensitive Pious Network will need new Skipper for sinking ship.

Youth Movement: Where Will Trae Young Rank Among All-Time Top Freshmen?

In any credible assessment involving Oklahoma's Trae Young, an observer shouldn't get too caught up in the moment. But it's probably not stretching credulity to proclaim Young, pacing the nation in scoring and assists, is on pace to going down as the best all-round freshman guard in NCAA history, surpassing LSU's Chris Jackson in 1988-89. He and his father, Rayford (14.1 ppg, 3.2 rpg, 3.8 apg and 1.6 spg for Texas Tech from 1996-97 through 1999-00), could emerge as one of the premier father-son combinations in NCAA annals.

A championship ring in 2011-12 certainly propelled Kentucky's Anthony Davis into the discussion for acknowledging the best freshman center of all-time along with Patrick Ewing, Keith Lee, Greg Oden, Robert Parish, Jeff Ruland, Ralph Sampson, Joe Smith and Wayman Tisdale. The NCAA title is a credential making it easier to possibly place Davis atop the list of premium frosh pivotmen although Ohio State's Oden reached the NCAA final with comparable statistics a mere nine years ago prior to flopping in the NBA.

UK fans could build a case that John Wall's freshman campaign only seven years ago was more significant. After all, the Wildcats improved their record from the previous season with Wall in coach John Calipari's debut by a stunning 12 games, which was 50% higher than what they improved with Davis manning the middle.

Frankly, it's frequently disconcerting how much many pundits either have memory loss or possess little more than an amateurish knowledge of hoops history outside the region where they work. Young didn't rank among the nation's top 10 freshmen on any list entering this campaign. Three years ago, Jabari Parker (Duke) and Andrew Wiggins (Kansas) were proclaimed as God's gifts to basketball. But they aren't included among the following CollegeHoopedia.com's national perspective of the all-time freshman squads:

FIRST TEAM
Carmelo Anthony, Syracuse (2002-03: 22.2 ppg, 10 rpg)
Leading scorer and rebounder for 2003 NCAA Tournament champion was named Final Four Most Outstanding Player. Posted a remarkable 22 double-doubles in 35 games.

Kevin Durant, Texas (2006-07: 25.8 ppg, 11.1 rpg, 1.9 bpg, 40.4 3FG%)
Forced by the NBA's new rule requiring draftees to attend college at least one year, he became national player of the year. Finished fourth in the nation in scoring and rebounding. Led the Big 12 Conference in scoring, rebounding, blocked shots and double-doubles (20).

Chris Jackson, Louisiana State (1988-89: 30.2 ppg, 4.1 apg, 81.5 FT%)
Exploded for 53 points vs. Florida and 55 vs. Ole Miss en route to setting NCAA freshman scoring records with 965 points and 30.2 average. Consensus SEC player of the year was an AP and USBWA first-team All-American.

Bernard King, Tennessee (1974-75: 26.4 ppg, 12.3 rpg, 62.2 FG%)
No freshman has matched his overall statistical figures. The Volunteers improved their overall record by only one game from the previous season, however.

Robert Parish, Centenary (1972-73: 23 ppg, 18.7 rpg, 57.9 FG%)
Scored school-record 50 points at Lamar in a game he also grabbed 30 rebounds. Collected 31 points and 33 rebounds vs. Southern Mississippi and 38 points and 29 rebounds vs. Texas-Arlington. Contributed 14 contests with at least 20 rebounds as a frosh, averaging 21.3 rpg in a 14-game, mid-season stretch.

SECOND TEAM
Mark Aguirre, DePaul (1978-79: 24 ppg, 7.6 rpg, 52.0 FG%)
Top freshman scorer in the nation broke the Blue Demons' scoring record with 767 points. He had a 29-point, eight-rebound performance vs. UCLA in his college debut and finished the season by being named to the All-Final Four team.

Anthony Davis, Kentucky ( 2011-12: 14.2 ppg, 10.4 rpg, 4.7 bpg, 62.3 FG%)
Lowest-ever scoring average for a national POY, but he set an NCAA record for most blocked shots by a freshman en route to becoming Final Four Most Outstanding Player despite scoring only six points on 1-of-10 field-goal shooting in NCAA championship contest.

Magic Johnson, Michigan State (1977-78: 17 ppg, 7.9 rpg, 7.4 apg)
Led the Big Ten Conference in league play in assists (6.8 apg), tied for third in scoring (19.8 ppg) and finished sixth in rebounding (8.2 rpg) to help the Spartans go from a 10-17 record the previous year to 25-5 and capture the Big Ten title.

Keith Lee, Memphis State (1981-82: 18.3 ppg, 11 rpg, 3.5 bpg, 53.8 FG%)
Led the Tigers in scoring, rebounding and blocked shots as they improved their record from 13-14 the previous season to 24-5. Set Metro Conference record with 11.5 rebounds per game in league competition.

Wayman Tisdale, Oklahoma (1982-83: 24.5 ppg, 10.3 rpg, 58.0 FG%)
NCAA consensus first-team All-American. Big Eight Conference player of the year broke Wilt Chamberlain's league scoring record with 810 points, including 46 vs. Iowa State.

THIRD TEAM
Shareef Abdur-Rahim, California (1995-96: 21.1 ppg, 8.4 rpg, 51.8 FG%)
The first freshman ever to be named Pacific-10 Conference player of the year led the Bears in steals with 52. His best game overall was a 32-point, 18-rebound performance at Washington State.

Adrian Dantley, Notre Dame (1973-74: 18.3 ppg, 9.7 rpg, 55.8 FG%)
Led the Irish in free-throw shooting (82.6%) and was second on the team in scoring and rebounding. He had a 41-point outing vs. West Virginia. Notre Dame improved its record from 18-12 the previous season to 26-3.

Mark Macon, Temple (1987-88: 20.6 ppg, 5.6 rpg, 2.9 apg)
Scored in double figures in 33 of 34 games. Led the 32-2 Owls in scoring and was second in assists. He was the first freshman ever to be the leading scorer for a team ranking No. 1 in a final AP national poll.

Mark Price, Georgia Tech (1982-83: 20.3 ppg, 4.3 apg, 87.7 FT%)
First freshman ever to lead the vaunted Atlantic Coast Conference in scoring. He also paced the ACC in free-throw percentage and three-point field goals.

Ralph Sampson, Virginia (1979-80: 14.9 ppg, 11.2 rpg, 4.6 bpg, 54.7 FG%)
Led the Cavaliers to the NIT championship. He was the headliner of perhaps the greatest single crop of freshman recruits in NCAA history.

FOURTH TEAM
Kenny Anderson, Georgia Tech (1989-90: 20.6 ppg, 5.5 rpg, 8.1 apg)
Only freshman ever to score more than 20 points in four straight NCAA playoff games. He led the ACC in assists.

Michael Beasley, Kansas State (2007-08: 26.2 ppg, 12.4 rpg, 1.6 bpg, 53.2 FG%)
He had a total of 13 30-point games en route to 28 double-doubles.

Greg Oden, Ohio State (2006-07: 15.7 ppg, 9.6 rpg, 3.3 bpg, 61.6 FG%)
Powered the Buckeyes to the NCAA playoff championship game where they lost to two-time champion Florida.

Quentin Richardson, DePaul (1998-99: 18.9 ppg, 10.5 rpg)
Conference USA player of the year when he led the league in rebounding and was second in scoring, seventh in field-goal percentage and ninth in free-throw percentage, making him the only player in the C-USA to rank in the top 10 in each of those categories. He led the Blue Demons in scoring 21 times and in rebounding on 23 occasions.

Joe Smith, Maryland (1993-94: 19.4 ppg, 10.7 rpg, 3.1 bpg)
One of only two players in ACC history to be an all-league first-team selection in both his freshman and sophomore seasons.

FIFTH TEAM
Kevin Love, UCLA (2007-08: 17.5 ppg, 10.6 rpg, 55.9 FG%)
Led the Bruins' Final Four squad in scoring and rebounding, contributing 23 double-doubles.

Jahlil Okafor, Duke (2014-15: 17.3 ppg, 8.5 rpg, 1.4 bpg, 66.4 FG%)
Centerpiece for the Blue Devils' freshman-dominated NCAA Tournament championship club.

Derrick Rose, Memphis (2007-08: 14.9 ppg, 4.5 rpg, 4.7 apg)
Ringleader of team that should have won NCAA title but shoddy free-throw shooting enabled Kansas to frustrate the Tigers in overtime in the championship game.

Lionel Simmons, La Salle (1986-87: 20.3 ppg, 9.8 rpg, 52.6 FG%)
Set the stage for becoming three-time MAAC MVP and one of only four major-college players ever to score more than 600 points in each of four seasons. La Salle's Tom Gola is the only individual to finish his college career with a higher total of points and rebounds (4,663 from 1952-55).

Jared Sullinger, Ohio State (2010-11: 17.2 ppg, 10.2 rpg, 54.1 FG%)
Helped the Buckeyes spend the entire season ranked among the nation's top four teams.

John Wall, Kentucky (2009-10: 16.6 ppg, 4.3 rpg, 6.5 apg, 1.8 spg)
He was SEC MVP but how impactful was his season when teammate DeMarcus Cousins earned the SEC Freshman of the Year award?

TEN MOST OVERLOOKED FRESHMAN SEASONS

Freshman, School (Season: Statistical Achievements)
Jason Conley, Virginia Military (2001-02: 29.3 ppg, 8 rpg, 81.8 FT%)
Stephen Curry, Davidson (2006-07: 21.5 ppg, 85.5 FT%, 40.8 3FG%)
Jacky Dorsey, Georgia (1974-75: 25.8 ppg, 11.8 rpg)
Larry Hughes, Saint Louis (1997-98: 20.9 ppg, 5.1 rpg, 2.2 spg)
Harry Kelly, Texas Southern (1979-80: 29 ppg, 7.8 rpg)
Karl Malone, Louisiana Tech (1982-83: 20.9 ppg, 10.3 rpg, 58.2 FG%)
CJ McCollum, Lehigh (2009-10: 19.1 ppg, 5 rpg, 2.4 apg, 42.1 3FG%)
Jeff Ruland, Iona ( 1977-78: 22.3 ppg, 12.8 rpg, 59.4 FG%)
Rodney Stuckey, Eastern Washington (2005-06: 24.2 ppg, 4.8 rpg, 4.1 apg, 2.2 spg)
Gary Trent, Ohio University (1992-93: 19 ppg, 9.3 rpg, 65.1 FG%)

Chaminade Shocked Top-Ranked Virginia On Second Day Before Christmas

Two days before Christmas is the anniversary of a "David vs. Goliath" game hailed as one of the biggest upsets in college basketball history when national player of the year Ralph Sampson and Virginia got coal in their stocking by losing at Chaminade, 77-72, in Hawaii in 1982-83. The contest triggered one of the greatest achievements in small-college history as Chaminade went on to defeat an NCAA Division I school winning at least one NCAA playoff game in three consecutive campaigns. Following is a chronological list of victories by small schools over major universities going on to win at least one NCAA playoff game that season:

Small College NCAA Playoff Team (Record) Score
Georgetown College (KY) Louisville (19-12 in 1958-59) 84-78
St. Mary's (TX) Houston (25-5 in 1969-70) 76-66
Chaminade (Hawaii) Virginia (29-5 in 1982-83) 77-72
Chaminade (Hawaii) Louisville (24-11 in 1983-84) 83-72
Chaminade (Hawaii) Southern Methodist (23-10 in 1984-85) 71-70
Alaska-Anchorage Michigan (30-7 in 1988-89) 70-66
UC Riverside Iowa (23-10 in 1988-89) 110-92
Alaska-Anchorage Wake Forest (21-12 in 1993-94) 70-68
American-Puerto Rico Arkansas (24-9 in 1997-98) 64-59
Bethel (IN) Valparaiso (23-10 in 1997-98) 85-75
Elizabeth City State (NC) Norfolk State (26-10 in 2011-12) 69-57

NOTES: Michigan '89 became NCAA champion and Louisville '59 reached the Final Four. . . . UC Riverside subsequently moved up to the NCAA Division I level in 2000-01.

Oakland, which nearly upset #1 Michigan State prior to Christmas two years ago, almost joined Chaminade and Northern Iowa among the following list of seven nationally unranked non-DI or mid-major schools in the last 50 years upsetting the nation's top-ranked team from a power conference then or now (DePaul only university in this #1 category losing at home to mid-major):

Season Date Power-League Member Ranked No. 1 Score Upsetting Non-Power League Team Unranked Opponent's Coach
1980-81 1-10-81 DePaul 63-62 Old Dominion Paul Webb
1982-83 12-24-82 Virginia 77-72 at Chaminade (Hawaii) Merv Lopes
1987-88 1-2-88 Arizona 61-59 at New Mexico Gary Colson
1995-96 12-22-95 Kansas 74-66 Temple in OT at East Rutherford, NJ John Chaney
2011-12 11-26-11 North Carolina 90-80 at UNLV Dave Rice
2012-13 12-15-12 Indiana 88-86 Butler in OT at Indianapolis Brad Stevens
2015-16 11-21-15 North Carolina 71-67 at Northern Iowa Ben Jacobson

Virginia's Terry Holland was among many of the biggest names in college coaching history recovering from embarrassing defeats certainly not cited on their otherwise mostly-regal resumes. For instance, there are numerous mentors who captured NCAA championships despite losing to a small school at some point during their careers - Phog Allen (lost to Emporia State), Jim Calhoun (American International, Assumption, Brandeis, Bridgeport, Florida Southern, Merrimack, St. Anselm, Stonehill and Tufts), John Calipari (Florida Tech and Lowell), Denny Crum (Chaminade), Jim Harrick (Abilene Christian), Don Haskins (Louisiana College), Hank Iba (Abilene Christian and Westminster), George Ireland (Regis), Doggie Julian (Amherst, Colby, St. Anselm, St. Michael's, Springfield, Tampa and Williams), Mike Krzyzewski (King's, Scranton and SUNY-Buffalo), Rollie Massimino (New Orleans and Philadelphia Textile), Al McGuire (Evansville and Washington MO), Rick Pitino (Adelphi), Nolan Richardson Jr. (American-Puerto Rico), Norman Sloan (Presbyterian), John Thompson Jr. (Assumption, Gannon, Randolph-Macon and Roanoke) and Jim Valvano (Armstrong State, Bloomsburg, Gannon, Tampa and Wilkes).

Kansas' Bill Self lost 18 consecutive contests bridging the 1993-94 and 1994-95 seasons with Oral Roberts but at least he didn't lose a decision to a non-Division I institution. The following alphabetical list "retraces steps" of prominent coaches who lost games to non-Division I colleges during their major-college careers:

Name Game: Why is NCAA Consumed with Nickname Change Crusade?

An initiative stemming from higher education do-gooders spawned the NCAA's meddling progressive-policy police focusing on changing nicknames and logos allegedly hostile to American Indians. Believe it or not, the foolishness spilled over to religion history whereby Holy Cross is contemplating shedding its moniker (Crusaders).

"It's nonsense," said Tom Heinsohn, an All-American for HC in the mid-1950s after the Crusaders posted their last NCAA playoff victory in 1953. "Political correctness. Gimme a break."

Previous schools failing to show sufficient spunk and making politically-correct decisions by switching their supposedly demeaning and highly-insensitive nicknames were Arkansas State (changed from Indians to Red Wolves), Colgate (Red Raiders to Raiders), Dartmouth (Indians to Big Green), Eastern Michigan (Hurons to Eagles), Louisiana-Monroe (Indians to Warhawks), Marquette (Warriors to Golden Eagles), Massachusetts (Redmen to Minutemen), Miami of Ohio (Redskins to RedHawks), North Dakota (Fighting Sioux to Fighting Hawks), Oklahoma City (Chiefs to Stars), Quinnipiac (Braves to Bobcats), St. John's (Redmen to Red Storm), Seattle (Chieftains to Redhawks), Siena (Indians to Saints), Southeast Missouri State (Indians to Redhawks) and Stanford (Indians to Cardinal). What is the infatuation with Redhawks, anyway?

For those insensitive louts non-pulsed by an offensive holier-than-thou victimization obsession, are they to feel shame at the extent of the alleged discrimination? Rather than bow to pressure, many traditional observers hope the following "Last of the Mohegans" remain steadfast and retain their time-honored monikers: Alcorn State (Braves), Bradley (Braves), Central Michigan (Chippewas), Florida State (Seminoles), Illinois (Fighting Illini), Utah (Utes) and William & Mary (Tribe).

If not, you run the risk of left-wing zealots from PETA (unless they are card-carrying members of the parallel universe People for Eating Tasty Animals) and the Bird Lovers International crowd possibly feeling empowered to capitalize on this catalyst for constructive social change by making it a heartless foul to have any nickname referencing a precious animal or fowl. What was the cumulative cost for nickname changes and how many mental midgets did it take at the NCAA to concoct this colossal caricature intervention? No wonder it's so easy to ridicule the governing body with a name-calling barrage. In the aftermath of authentic turmoil across the country at so-called elite institutions, many think there are more significant issues in intercollegiate athletics such as academic integrity requiring correction from the NCAA rather than where transgenders go to bathroom and giving a selective outrage forum to pious pinheads manufacturing a mascot/nickname problem that really didn't exist to any meaningful degree.

CollegeHoopedia.com has conducted significant research on DI school nickname changes over the years and the origin of unusual DI school nicknames. Check the summaries and decide how critical the issue is for yourself as we strive to survive in Liberal-land's weak-kneed Fantasy World full of "green" gestapos. Many misplaced monologues consumed with climate-change collective salvation mockingly hide behind widows and orphans while pointedly picking on concerned bible-clinging Christians rather than marauding Muslims. Don't you think right-thinking Americans, seeking terrorist control; not gun control or climate control, need to turn up the heat to find a brave "warrior" to combat or even "contain" authentic savages?

War on Women: #MeToo Schemers Could Have Made Fortune in College Hoops

There should be a Go Fund Me account for those of us offended whenever self-promoting mother/daughter duo Gloria Allred and Lisa Bloom - women's rights lawyers/extortionists "extraordinaire" - hit the airwaves with doctored evidence and therapeutic crying towels. Boisterous Bloom sought to solicit cash from donors and media outlets for accusers of sexual misconduct alleged about #TheDonald. Unscrupulous Bloom, affiliating with demented demagogue David Brock, offered to sell the victims' Pay-to-Say tales while wanting to pocket a portion for herself as a commission. She persuaded a Democratic donor to pay off one accuser's flip-flopping make-up artist mortgage and tried to get a hefty six-figure payday for a hospitalized woman who eventually declined to come forward despite exponentially-increasing offers up to $750,000. Read Bloom's disgusting emails and text messages if you want to lose your lunch and get an urge to recycle leech lawyer jokes.

At any rate, which sexual-deviant B.C. (Bill Clinton or Bill Cosby) should be designated BC (Biggest Conniver)? Beyond Clinton's Oral Office, is nothing sacred as father-figure Cosby's silence about numerous female accusations speaks volumes? We'll never think of Fat Albert and Jell-O pudding in the same way the more we hear about a settlement between former Temple women's basketball staffer Andrea Constand and Cosby, the school's most famous alumnus. Standards depend upon how much one donates to a university on or off the court/field. Temple's indifferent administration, apparently still much too fond of Jello-O pudding samples or Quaaludes lethargic, kept Cosby as a member of its Board of Trustees while many other entities dropped Dr. Huxtable off a cliff quicker than a Ferguson or Baltimore thief mishandling a liquor bottle scampering out of a looted convenience store hurdling debris like an aging track star fantasizing about an aphrodisiac drink. The Cosby Show was finally cancelled as a TU Trustee after Thanksgiving before degenerate's striking number of accusers formed a cathartic coalition. Cigars stored elsewhere, Clinton must have a freezer full of Jell-O pops spiked with "distinguishing-characteristic" Quaaludes received from admirer Cos, going blind from who knows what. Have you wondered if #SickWillie's attorney with wallet full of his sex-dollar bills was involved in negotiating #HarveySwinestein's contract tolerating sexual harassment by acknowledging prospect of pathetic pig, supported by Bloom, paying Cosmic settlements to aggrieved women?

If Jimmy Carter felt comfortable smiling while criticizing "we-know-what-has-to-be-done," then there is an absolute absence of mentally-tough authentic leaders. The NFL essentially ignored domestic violence until Candid Camera delivered demonstrable deviance igniting a cover-up. In sports, what the presstitutes miss is that zero tolerance for the troubling "War on Women" needs to be addressed in high school and college before the lack of a moral compass reaches the green room for pink-ribbon and pink-shoe donning pros. Actually, Allred and Bloom missed the boat dwelling on celebrities and politicians when they could have made a fortune focusing on college sports during and after scholars were big man on campus. For instance, former Arkansas State guard Arthur Agee Jr., featured in documentary Hoop Dreams (1994 Oscar-nominated film following prep players in Chicago) was accused of punching a woman in mid-November 2017, causing her to incur three fractured ribs.

Only heaven knew where tawdry allegations would end up in aftermath of legal "Hoop Nightmare" maneuverings against former Memphis guard Derrick Rose and Sacramento Mayor/Depreciated Democrat Kevin Johnson. Rose testified he was taught at the NBA's rookie camp to take used condoms with him after sex. Cynically, coach John Calipari could have been referring to Rose's group-effort escapades several years ago when saying "he (great kid) is taking better care of his body than at any other point during his career." Shouldn't there be more reflexive concern for victims rather than impact on roster of team with alleged criminal? According to the FBI, about 70% of domestic violence probes fail to result in criminal cases. Those figures coincide with estimates claiming about two-thirds of sexual assault charges involving college athletes reportedly are dropped or not filed similar to couple of TCU hoopers in 2006, two Michigan State freshmen hoopers during orientation in the fall of 2010, a Washington player probed in 2010-11 and pair of Providence freshman "players" several seasons ago. In light of Marquette failing to report multiple messy incidents to Milwaukee police, can you begin to fathom how many times "big-time" schools have covered up "Boys Gone Wild" indiscretions with get-out-of-trouble-free cards to keep rap sheets shorter than stat sheets?

Forfeiting any recruiting dignity, the MSU and PC freshman felonious activity coupled with Minnesota's frosh porn-star tryout in 2015-16 indicate that, at the bare minimum, schools need to improve their background checks. Statistics show athletes are convicted at a much lower rate than the general population. According to a USA Today study during a trial involving Kobe Bryant, prominent athletes are much less likely to be convicted of sexual assault than the average citizen. Consider this stark statistical comparison: 2/3 of the public-at-large is convicted when charged with sexual assault while 2/3 of prominent athletes are exonerated in similar allegations involving the brotherhood of scumbags. Can you imagine how many boosters and coaches have helped underwrite abortions? Thought is as ugly as mosaic of major male celebs unearthed as sexual abusers in 2017.

Disturbing allegations at Louisville (Chris Jones), Kansas (multiple players) and Duke (Rasheed Sulaimon) had their celebrated coaches either making incoherent comments or hiding under their desk. Minnesota and West Virginia endured similar unseemly "violation-of-team-rules" situations in the mid-1980s. Ditto Arizona State in the mid-1990s and priorities across the country haven't improved. Consider an Inside Higher Ed article written about a Syracuse dean facing dismissal for refusing to cover up an assault of a female student on campus by basketball players. Elsewhere, a culture concerning abuse of females frequently goes unchecked at sports factories reminiscent of group assault charges at Arkansas under coaches Nolan Richardson and John Pelphrey resulting in Ray Rice-like initial modest sanctions. Will it really change under Razorbacks coach Mike Anderson, who had more than his share of problem children at Missouri?

There are words and there are actions as well as "tough" guys and "cool" guys in this criminal "no-means-no" climate change. One-sided co-ed boxing apparently needs to get personal before the player-predator issue penetrates some thick skulls in the establishment media. For instance, ESPN college basketball analyst Dick Vitale, obsessed with "payday" and "cash" as always, tweeted he doesn't "dig actions away from ring but he (Floyd Mayweather Jr.) is an all-time great." Well, let's "dig" on one easy hipster wannabee layup straight from the grandstanding opening bell. Unless mindset of role model Dancin' Ray contaminates network judgment across the sports spectrum including Screamin' A. Stiff, no one with an extensive history of domestic abuse charges such as misfit Mayweather should be designated an all-time great in any way, shape or form with or without a cover-your-fanny-like-commish qualifier. Ditto for Florida State's troubled Jameis Winston, who Vitale tweeted was "great to have on your side on Saturday."

Presumably, Dickie V didn't mean late Saturday night with him and Uber driver or at any sort of Winston post-college game celebration leaving an accuser susceptible to dragging through the mud one way or the other (perhaps on a scooter). In a textbook example of Buc-kissing shilling, Vitale bragged about Shameless Jameis joining him at gala in Tampa Bay QB's first appearance as NFL player before the university settled with Winston's accuser for $950,000 in the spring of 2016. Methinks Vitale knows little, if anything, about FSU "football-fixer" associate AD who served time in prison for cocaine distribution. The general public's prevailing ignorance resembles failing to acknowledge the corrupt Clintons' "War on Women."

If the holier-than-thou press is so concerned about PC-police nickname changing, perhaps they should encourage schools to be more accurate with monikers such as Bailor Needed For Bad News Bears, Cincinnati Barely Can Read 'Cats, UConn Artists, Indiana Booziers, Kansas Jailhawks, Louisville Horndogs Breaking Cardinal Rules, Memphis Mafia Malcontents, Minnesota Go-for-hers, Miz-zou Animals, UNCheat Tarrin (Gals in) Heels, Syracuse Orange Jumpsuits, UNLV Sincredibles, etc.

Also, can any of the journalistic jackals unearth whether "The Carolina (Academic) Way" for Raymond Felton and Ty Lawson included a rigorous African and Afro-American independent study course on how to treat the opposite sex, Africa's subjugation of females or discerning the origin of HIV and Ebola virus rather than the importance of Swahili language? If the scheme was solely for GPA boosting, Carolina's 2005 (10 of 15 members were AFAS majors with total of 35 "pretty doggone good" bogus classes over two semesters) and 2009 NCAA titles should of been in jeopardy of being vacated. But the UNC placed on probation for scholastic shenanigans was Northern Colorado; not Carolina. At the very least, for the sake of supplying a good chuckle to offset a portion of the angst, we should be entitled to digest a sampling of prose from those unread Prime Time 10-page papers (assigned mostly A grades with few B+ marks since a few players may have misspelled their names). UNC, admitting "regrettable actions," should have been sanctioned simply because disgraceful no-show classes came under the umbrella of a Center For Ethics.

The university paid well over $1 million in PR costs dealing with the scholastic scandal but that's an affordable expense insofar as there was significant savings over these many years when no faculty was necessary to actually provide instruction for bogus book-work. Rather than learning classy pass fakes on the court, the courted players passed by "learning" in fake classes. It's no excuse but, if the let's-not-dwell-on-the-negative media would get off its royal cushion, how many other schools across the nation have comparable compromising courses? A polluted program under current coach Richard Pitino, who brought in troubled transfers Reggie Lynch and Daquein McNeil, isn't exactly virgin territory among power-league members. The Gophers have "hole" history featuring a former Minnesota tutor claiming she wrote or helped write more than 400 papers or pieces of coursework for in excess of 20 Gophers players in the mid-1990s, multiple pre-Lynch/pre-#AlFrankenstein prospects-turned-suspects (Courtney James/Mitchell Lee/Trevor Mbakwe/Royce White) and recent out-of-control athletic director. The NCAA should remember: "If you don't stand for something (such as higher scholastic standards), you'll fall for anything (excessive number of suspect student-athletes)."

How in Heel is having athletic department personnel steering players into sham classes for 18 years not, at its core curriculum, a textbook definition of "lack of institutional control?" When will ESPN get to the bottom of the chicanery yielding answers via another orchestrated interview with coach Roy Williams serving as master of "really-bothered-by-whole-thing" ceremonies featuring backdrop of supportive ex-players? ESPN should have just gone ahead and issued Williams' support group some "Game Day" posters for their little pep rally at big boss' alma mater. Network could have called charade Skipper's short three-hour tour.

How difficult would it have been for Williams, instead of pleading educational mission ignorance, to take a few minutes per semester assessing academic progress of each of his players? Didn't he acknowledge there was "class clustering" early in his Carolina head coaching tenure? It is the height of hypocrisy for him and other DI mentors/"fathers" to have a contract bonus provision stemming from APR/graduation rates. Will UNC encourage him to apologize to whistle-blower tutor Mary "Just Keep My Players Eligible" Willingham? Didn't Williams figuratively punch her (triggering death threats in aftermath of additional administration admonishments) by impugning Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary's character saying her illiteracy claims were untrue and totally unfair about a striking number of scholars boasting middle-school reading skills? Said Willingham prior to settling a lawsuit with UNC for $335,000 (about $1,000 per basketball player enrollment in paper class minus attorneys' fees): "I went to a lot of basketball games in the Dean Dome, but Roy never came and sat with me while I tutored his guys." Heaven help us if Williams' "sad-time" excuses are typical of the coaching community level of interest in authentic advancement toward a genuine diploma.

Which is worse - free grades/dean's list for not even attending rogue class (see Rashad McCants), free abuse of female tutor or free rental cars for top returning scorer (P.J. Hairston) linked to an ex-convict? An absence of press accountability in the Carolinas probably is why a Democratic male running for statewide office can chuckle after calling a Republican female sitting governor a "whore." What we have here is a failure to exhibit standards; not so much an inability to thoroughly discuss the (physical and/or verbal) beat-down topic and appease the all-women sports gabfest "We Need to Talk" on CBS. The coaches' Sgt. Schultz "I-know-nothing" routine is insulting spit because they usually know when a regular takes an irregular dump. The NFL and NBA likely will announce policies "to do more," but when will colleges and the media do likewise to mitigate Sharia Law-like malignant message dumping on women? Instead, we get Kansas' Selfless coach creatively saying a player involved in school probe was "ill" upon missing a couple of games.

What is it about punks flourishing at sports that makes adults fall all over themselves making excuses for abhorrent behavior? Amid the pimpish compartmentalization, there are also "clever" outfits such as Oregon stemming from its timing in waiting to expel three players implicated in an alleged sexual assault in order to avoid a reduction in its Academic Progress Rate score before reaching 2017 Final Four with another player under comparable criminal investigation. Telephone records clearly convey Oregon athletic officials were concerned about last year's player and NCAA gumshoes should be, too, instead of whether an assistant coach refereed a scrimmage. Meanwhile, fellow Pac-12 Conference member California adopted a stricter admissions policy when it comes to academics. Meanwhile, Indiana embraced a no-admittance policy regarding previous indiscretions. Will Cal and IU set a nationwide trend for increased scholastic and decorum standards or will majority of universities duck the issue? Not if their on-court performances this season are any barometer or the condescending NCAA headquarters remains much more concerned about Indian nicknames than ending licking of dames. Can the NCAA at least encourage its members to consider utilizing Norway's syllabus teaching Muslim male migrants how to treat non-veiled women?

Speaking of "tough, cool and clever" guys, Mayweather told CNN that "only God can judge me." But let's play The Almighty role and make things personal prior to enablers going on their merry way "earning" academic-anemia "dollars" off the next round of ill-equipped recruits. Father-figure coaches masquerading as social workers who persuade admissions offices to enroll some of the "exception" vermin should be sued by victims if the abuse is campus connected under their stewardship. As for the mess media (student newspaper had to step up to the plate at Duke), perhaps Vitale's next book could be "You're Awful, Baby! With a Capital A!: 100 Players I Praised as Great But Glad My Daughters Didn't Date." Striving to avoid turning a blind eye, below we'll give his researchers a head start on the EBOLA (Excessive Beatings are Outlandish of Ladies by Athletes) epidemic with robust list of scholars to assess en route to him setting a Guinness Book of World Records for most basketball volumes with name on the cover as author.

Research shows that arrests of college athletes are more than double those of pros. Former Duke starter Jay Bilas has experiential ACC knowledge competing against colorful North Carolina State coach Jim Valvano's suspect squads (735 average SAT score - featuring Chris Washburn at 470 - and excessive number of positive drug tests during the 1980s). While pondering rigorous courses washout Washburn somehow passed to remain academically eligible for more than a season, a cold-blooded question surfaces as to whether the academic anemia at UNC is worse than what occurred at N.C. State, which probably gains the negative nod if only because of Washburn teammate Charles Shackleford's following animal-expert quote: "Left hand, right hand, it doesn't matter. I'm amphibious." The "A" in "bring your A-game" in an old ACC ad apparently didn't stand for academics.

If bookish Bilas genuinely knows self-evaluation "toughness," he will maneuver upstream and shift his passion from lambasting the NCAA about paying these gentlemen and scholars to a lawyer-like focus on stopping the NCAA from preying on players who have no business representing universities because they aren't authentic student-athletes (although Sulaimon was still enrolled as student when allegations against him surfaced). Granted, such an academic-values modification will translate into an inferior product for him and his network to promote (and for luminaries such as Jim Boeheim, Calipari, Bob Huggins, Mike Krzyzewski, Rick Pitino plus Williams to coach for that matter). But does a mediocre Duke player such as Lance Thomas need more than $30,000 as down payment on jewelry? What about multiple Memphis players reporting they were robbed of more than $66,000 worth of vital items for Calipari-coached college students (mink coats, diamond earrings, stereo equipment, flat-screen TV)?

Moreover, Syracuse's Boeheim wouldn't have an opportunity to be "impressed" about one-and-done Carmelo Anthony's 1.8 gpa before failing to mention if Anthony attended more classes than games his second semester. Did BMOC Melo mellow out in Orange-hot Child and Family Studies en route to underwriting Cuse's hoops centerpiece (The Melo Center)? No word yet from Boeheim after former Orange hooper/NFL quarterback Donovan McNabb was accused of sexual harassment by a former female colleague at the NFL Network and discarded by ESPN. At least the win-at-all-costs mentality is gender neutral as goalie Hope Solo flies above the Soccer Wars like Han Solo and school spirit took on a whole new meaning last season among Coastal Carolina's cheerleaders. More coaches are becoming members of the Garbage Collectors Guild as they don't give a rat's ass about anything beyond winning a few more games. What quality of classes could possibly be taken in college by mercenary professional-caliber athletes such as Rose if a mind-numbing 60% of NBA players file for bankruptcy five years after retirement?

A striking number of prominent schools (down to Florida, LSU and Oregon first week of new year) recruited power forward Emmitt Williams, who was arrested the previous fall in Florida on sexual battery and false imprisonment charges before charges were dismissed just before Christmas. Amid a scholastic schedule laden with decidedly non-academic courses, personal character flaws didn't surface solely upon reaching the professional level and power league members unscathed by female battery are clearly in the minority. As much of the lame-stream media looks the other way like a referee in waning moments seeking a blowout game to finish, here are vital facts on what really is outside the lines since ESPN came on the scene in the late 1970s and CBS assumed control of March Madness. Key commentators, appearing as if they were drugged, aimlessly address relevant "no-means-no" issues about as much as Cosby answered pertinent inquiries. Compare how much air-time was given to "singing the praises" of the following alphabetical list of Three-S "Men" (Stupid, Sin-tillating and Sin-sational) to how much was devoted elaborating on their Hoop Hall of Shame misdeeds against women or offering solutions preventing exploitation of such derelict student-athletes even if the quality of basketball is reduced and might negatively affect ratings, endorsement deals, speaking engagement fees or circulations of periodicals:

Nova Stars as Latest Blue-blood Program Ranked Atop National Rankings

Different shades of blue comprise uniform colors of the five blue-blood programs spending the most weeks ranked #1 in major-college history - UCLA, Duke, Kentucky, North Carolina and Kansas. Villanova, another school donning blue, has ranked atop the AP national poll each of the last three seasons. Nova's #1 stint three years ago was the first time Nova ever was perched on such a regular-season pedestal although the Wildcats won the 1985 NCAA Tournament crown.

Maryland seemed to be the most likely heir apparent to succeed Villanova as #1 late in the campaign two years ago until the Terrapins dropped a couple of contests against second-division Big Ten Conference opponents. Thus the Terps, NCAA titlist in 2002, remained on the list of seven schools capturing an NCAA crown at some point in their history but never earning a regular-season top ranking, joining Oregon (1939 champion), Wyoming (1943), Utah (1944), CCNY (1950), California (1959) and Texas-El Paso (1966).

Last season, Baylor succeeded Nova as #1, albeit shortly, early in the new year. In doing so, the Bears became the sixth team - fourth in nine campaigns - to ascend to the top of the national polls after going unranked among the Preseason Top 20 since 1968-69. Will Arizona State join this distinguished list in 2017-18? Wake Forest '09 and Gonzaga '13 each was ranked #21 in the PS before joining the following squads in this underestimated category:

Unranked in Preseason Top 20 Coach Summary of Stint as Nation's Top-Ranked Team
Indiana State '79 Bill Hodges Sycamores ranked among nation's top two teams last seven weeks.
Kansas '90 Roy Williams Jayhawks ranked among nation's top two teams 14 weeks in a row.
Wake Forest '09 Dino Gaudio Demon Deacons ranked among nation's top two teams two weeks in a row.
Syracuse '10 Jim Boeheim Orange ranked among nation's top five teams 13 of last 14 weeks.
Gonzaga '13 Mark Few Zags ranked atop national polls last three weeks of season.
Baylor '17 Scott Drew Bears ranked #1 one week.

NOTE: Eventual #1 teams UNLV '83 (T20th), Connecticut '95 (19th) and Stanford '04 (19th) barely made the PS Top 20 in their respective seasons.

Heisman Hoopers: Will Another Mr. Versatile Such As Charlie Ward Emerge?

Will another hooper ever strike the Heisman pose? At least three Heisman Trophy winners in three straight decades - 1940s, 1950s and 1960s - are among the football players also competing in college basketball. But Florida State's Charlie Ward (1993) is the only such multi-sport athlete in the last 50 years to achieve the feat.

At a time when basketball and football seasons overlap, you might want to know three Heisman recipients in a 10-year span from 1947 through 1956 were from Notre Dame. Following is an alphabetical list of Heisman Trophy winners who played varsity basketball at some point in their college careers:

Heisman Winner Year School Where Also Played BKB (Hoop Summary) FB Pos.
Terry Baker 1962 Oregon State (All-West Regional selection in NCAA Tournament in 1962 and 1963) QB
Ernie Davis 1961 Syracuse (team-high rebound average with 9.6 rpg in 1960-61) HB
Glenn Davis 1946 Army (hoop team member in 1944-45 and 1945-46) FB
Tom Harmon 1940 Michigan (averaged 7.6 ppg as sophomore in 1938-39) HB
Paul Hornung 1956 Notre Dame (averaged 6.1 ppg in 10 games as sophomore in 1954-55) QB
Dick Kazmaier 1951 Princeton (averaged 3.4 ppg as sophomore and junior) HB
Larry Kelley 1936 Yale (finished among top 12 in scoring in EIL in 1935-36 and 1936-37) E
Nile Kinnick 1939 Iowa (runner-up in scoring average with 6.1 ppg as sophomore) HB
Johnny Lattner 1953 Notre Dame (game-winning basket in OT at NYU in 1951-52) HB
Johnny Lujack 1947 Notre Dame (averaged 3.4 ppg as starting guard in 1943-44) QB
Roger Staubach 1963 Navy (played varsity hoops in 1962-63) QB
Doak Walker 1948 Southern Methodist (letterman as freshman in 1945-46) HB
Charlie Ward 1993 Florida State (averaged 8.1 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 4.4 apg and 2.6 spg first half of 1990s) QB

Bowling Ball: Numerous Versatile Athletes Played Hoops After FB Bowl Game

There have been a striking number of hoopers over the years contributing to bowl football teams prior to switching from the gridiron to the hardwood. Former South Carolina football wide receiver/basketball guard Bruce Ellington, after throwing a touchdown pass to the Gamecocks' quarterback on a reverse and catching a go-ahead TD pass in the second half of the Capital One Bowl against Wisconsin four years ago, is among the all-time Top 10 "Men For All Seasons."

In an era of specialization, research reveals Ellington is the first major-college basketball regular to compete the same academic school year in three consecutive football bowl games. He joined Terry Baker (Oregon State), Mike Bush (Washington State), Rick Casares (Florida), Ronald Curry (North Carolina), Charles Davis (Purdue), Pete "Bump" Elliott (Michigan), Fred Gibson (Georgia), Teyo Johnson (Stanford), Matt Jones (Arkansas), Terry Kirby (Virginia), Dave Logan (Colorado) and Tony "Zippy" Morocco (Georgia) as athletes who scored a touchdown in a bowl game shortly before or after switching uniforms and making significant contributions to the school's basketball squad. Ellington, after pacing USC in pass receptions, cut short both his college football and basketball career by declaring early for the NFL draft (started two of three early-season hoop contests).

In the ultimate one-and-only achievement, Baker is the lone football Heisman Trophy winner to play in the basketball Final Four (1963). Kirby, a running back, and Matt Blundin, a quarterback, were teammates who competed in back-to-back years for Virginia football squads in bowl games (Florida Citrus following 1989 season and Sugar following 1990) before becoming members of Cavaliers hoop teams participating in the NCAA playoffs.

Michigan State's Andre Rison is among a striking number of athletes who "crafted" playing both sports at the highest collegiate level in the same school year. NFL all-time great tight end Tony Gonzalez (California) is among the following alphabetical list of versatile athletes since the end of World War II who played in at least one football bowl game the same school year they were a hoop regular (bowl year denotes when regular season was played):

Football-Basketball Player College FB Pos. Bowl Game(s) Two-Way Athlete Summary in Same Academic School Year
Doug Atkins Tennessee DE 1950 Cotton Eventual NFL first-round pick helped defeat Texas 20-14 before averaging 9.9 ppg for Volunteers' basketball squad.
Terry Baker Oregon State QB 1962 Liberty MVP's 99-yard run from scrimmage accounted for only points in 6-0 victory against Villanova before becoming runner-up in scoring (13.4 ppg) with Beavers' NCAA Tournament fourth-place finisher.
Connor Barwin Cincinnati TE 2006 International One solo tackle in 27-24 triumph against Western Michigan before averaging 1.2 ppg and 1.4 rpg for Bearcats' basketball team.
Matt Blundin Virginia QB 1989 Florida Citrus/1990 Sugar Backup in two defeats (31-21 vs. Illinois and 23-22 vs. Tennessee) while averaging 3.3 ppg and 4.6 rpg with two NCAA playoff teams for Cavaliers.
Larry Brown Georgia TE 1997 Outback Defeated Wisconsin 33-6 before averaging 6.3 ppg and 4.2 rpg for Bulldogs' NIT third-place team.
Mike Bush Washington State WR 2001 Sun A 46-yard TD reception helped defeat Purdue 33-27 before becoming Cougars' third-leading scorer with 10.9 ppg as hoop senior.
Rick Casares Florida FB-PK 1952 Gator Rushed 21 times for 86 yards, scoring first TD in Gators' bowl history, and kicked both extra points in 14-13 nod over Tulsa before All-SEC second-team selection paced hoop squad in scoring (15.5 ppg) and rebounding (11.5 rpg).
Rip Collins Louisiana State FB 1947 Cotton All-SEC pick helped LSU secure 15-1 edge in first downs and 255-54 advantage in net yards rushing in 0-0 tie with Arkansas in standoff known as Ice Bowl because of sleet and snow before earning letter for school's hoop squad.
Ed Crawford Mississippi DB 1955 Sugar Thwarted any comeback attempt by TCU with interception in Rebels' 14-13 win in 1956 Cotton Bowl after 21-0 Sugar Bowl setback against Navy previous year before earning hoops letter as 6-3 forward.
Ronald Curry North Carolina QB 1998 Las Vegas Curry's 48-yard TD scamper put Tar Heels in front to stay in 20-13 win over San Diego State before averaging 2.8 ppg and 1.7 apg for hoop squad upset in first round of NCAA playoffs by Weber State.
Charles Davis Purdue TE 2004 Sun His 6-yard TD reception from Kyle Orton put Boilermakers ahead with just over one minute remaining but Arizona State marched 80 yards in four plays to win 27-23 before Davis averaged 2.9 ppg and 3.1 rpg in coach Gene Keady's swan song.
Matt Davison Nebraska SE 1999 Fiesta Leading Husker receiver in three bowl games, including 31-21 nod over Tennessee, before starting two Big 12 Conference basketball contests.
Rickey Dudley Ohio State TE 1994 Florida Citrus Caught two passes for 26 yards in 24-17 setback against Alabama before averaging team-high 7.5 rpg.
Bruce Ellington South Carolina WR 2011 Capital One/2012 Outback/2013 Capital One Season-long 45-yard kickoff return in 30-13 win over Nebraska and caught game-winning TD pass with only seconds remaining in 33-28 victory against Michigan before averaging 10.5 ppg while finishing Gamecocks' leader in either assists or steals.
Pete "Bump" Elliott Michigan B 1947 Rose Bowl Rushed seven times for 53 yards and caught 1-yard TD pass in 49-0 romp over Southern California before averaging 6 ppg for Wolverine hoopsters.
Percy Ellsworth Virginia S 1994 Independence Integral part of defense leading nation in interceptions helped Cavaliers end four-game bowl losing streak with 20-10 verdict over TCU before appearing in all four contests with Midwest Regional runner-up in NCAA tourney.
James Francis Baylor LB 1986 Bluebonnet Eventual NFL first-round pick helped Bears beat Colorado 21-9 before averaging 2.2 ppg and 2.2 rpg while shooting 52.2% from floor.
Fred Gibson Georgia WR 2001 Music City Opened scoring with 15-yard TD reception but Boston College rallied to prevail 20-16 before Gibson averaged 4.9 ppg with Bulldogs' NCAA playoff team.
Tony Gonzalez California TE 1996 Aloha Established Cal bowl record with nine receptions in 42-38 reversal against Navy before averaging 6.8 ppg and 4.5 rpg with Bears' squad losing against North Carolina in East Regional semifinals.
Gregg Guenther Southern California TE 2003 Rose Part-time starter for national champion managed one reception for 19 yards from QB Matt Leinart in 28-14 win against Michigan before averaging 5.6 ppg and 4.7 rpg with Trojans' hoop squad.
Ross Hales Indiana TE 1993 Independence Caught 34-yard pass in second quarter of 45-20 loss against Virginia Tech before making token appearance for Coach Bob Knight in Hoosiers' 67-58 win over Temple in NCAA playoffs.
Cecil Hankins Oklahoma A&M B 1945 Cotton Two-way back and top pass receive for Aggies team that trounced TCU before playing forward and leading basketball squad in scoring in NCAA playoffs for 1945 national titlist.
Joe Howard Notre Dame WR 1983 Liberty Caught one pass for 43 yards in 19-18 decision over Doug Flutie-led Boston College before averaging 5.5 ppg and 3.3 apg as part-time starter with Irish NIT runner-up.
Teyo Johnson Stanford WR 2001 Seattle A 4-yard fourth-quarter TD reception closed gap prior to bowing against Georgia Tech 24-14 before averaging 5.8 ppg and 4 rpg with Cardinal NCAA playoff squad.
Matt Jones Arkansas QB 2003 Independence Scored go-ahead TD, rushed 7 times for 74 yards and completed 6 of 14 passes in 27-14 verdict over Missouri before averaging 5 ppg and 4.5 rpg as Hogs hoop freshman.
Wallace "Wah Wah" Jones Kentucky SE 1947 Great Lakes Leader in pass receptions from QB George Blanda under legendary coach Paul "Bear" Bryant for squad beating Villanova 24-14. All-SEC first-team selection in basketball averaged 9.3 ppg for Adolph Rupp's 1948 NCAA titlist.
Bronson Kaufusi Brigham Young DE 2012 Poinsettia Recorded sack in 23-6 victory against San Diego State before collecting 21 points and 34 rebounds in 20 hoop games for NIT semifinalist.
Corbin Kaufusi Brigham Young DL 2016 Poinsettia Posted four tackles in 24-21 triumph against Wyoming before 6-10 center collected 10 points and 15 rebounds in 16 hoop games for BYU.
Jeff King Virginia Tech TE 2004 Sugar Caught three passes for 12 yards in 16-13 setback against Auburn before collecting 18 points and 23 rebounds in 16 games as hoop freshman with Hokies.
Terry Kirby Virginia RB 1989 Florida Citrus/1990 Sugar Rushed for 139 yards in 29 carries with one TD in losses against Illinois (31-21) and Tennessee (23-22) before averaging 2.8 ppg in two seasons with Cavaliers' hoops squad.
Dave Logan Colorado WR 1975 Bluebonnet His 4-yard TD reception gave Buffaloes 14-0 lead prior to them succumbing against Texas 38-21 before becoming basketball team's runner-up in scoring (12.7 ppg) and rebounding (6.5 rpg).
Leonard Mitchell Houston DE 1978 Cotton UH squandered 34-12 lead when Joe Montana-led Notre Dame scored 23 unanswered points in fourth quarter to win by one before Mitchell averaged 5.4 ppg and 5.6 rpg for Cougars' hoop squad.
Tony "Zippy" Morocco Georgia HB 1950 Presidential Cup Scored two second-half touchdowns (30-yard run from scrimmage and 65-yard punt return) as Co-MVP in 40-20 setback against Texas A&M before averaging 9.7 ppg with Bulldogs' basketball team.
Andre Rison Michigan State WR 1987 Rose Had two long pass receptions (55 and 36 yards) in a 20-17 win against USC before registering 24 points and 42 assists in 18 games for the Spartans' basketball squad.
Nate Robinson Washington CB 2002 Sun His QB sack helped Huskies get off to strong start before bowing against Purdue 34-24 prior to freshman pacing hoopsters in scoring (13 ppg).
Reggie Rogers Washington DL 1984 Orange Eventual NFL first-round draft choice helped upend Oklahoma 28-17 before averaging 5.7 ppg and 3.9 rpg with Huskies' hoop squad.
Bill Saul Penn State LB 1959 Liberty Defeated Alabama 7-0 before averaging 6.1 ppg and 4 rpg with Nittany Lions' hoopsters.
Otto Schnellbacher Kansas E 1947 Orange Football co-captain finished career with records for receptions (58) and receiving yards (1,069) standing for 22 years. Leading scorer for KU's hoop squad in 1947-48.
Dick Schnittker Ohio State E 1950 Rose Rushed once for five yards in 17-14 victory against California before All-Big Ten Conference first-team selection was game-high scorer in two 1950 NCAA playoff contests for Buckeyes.
Austin Seferian-Jenkins Washington TE 2011 Alamo Caught five passes for 59 yards in highest-scoring regulation bowl game in history (67-56 loss to RGIII-led Baylor) before collecting seven points and nine rebounds in four NIT contests for Huskies' semifinalist.
Dick Soergel Oklahoma State QB 1958 Bluegrass Completed 6 of 12 passes for 77 yards and 2-point conversion in 15-6 win against Florida State before averaging 8.5 ppg and 4.9 rpg for Pokes' basketball squad plus posting 8-1 pitching record and winning national championship baseball game.
Wilson Thomas Nebraska WR 2001 Rose Huskers leading receiver caught three passes for 36 yards in 37-14 loss against Miami (Fla.) before averaging 4.6 ppg and 3.8 rpg.
Willie Townsend Notre Dame WR 1972 Orange Irish's top pass catcher and teammates lost to Johnny Rodgers-led Nebraska 40-6 before averaging 2.1 ppg for Digger Phelps-coached hoop squad.
Charlie Ward Florida State QB 1992 Orange/1993 Orange Completed 39-of-73 passes for 473 yards in back-to-back victories over Nebraska (27-14 and 18-16) while pacing FSU in assists and steals average his final two hoop campaigns.
Ron Widby Tennessee P 1965 Bluebonnet/1966 Gator Nation's top punter for coach Doug Dickey's second of first two Vols football teams that both went to bowl games (wins over Tulsa 27-6 and Syracuse 18-12) while also being an All-SEC basketball selection (including 50-point outburst in final home game).

Jailhouse Jocks: Hall of Shame Activity Still Can't Ruin NCAA Basketball

Walk-on stories aren't always Rudy-like inspirational. Beneath its glitz and glamour, college basketball has a description-defying unruly rap sheet including Emanuel "Trai" Donaldson III, who was ordered held without bond following arrest by Tampa police after four separate shooting murders this past fall involving victims ranging in ages from 22 to 60.

A McDonald's manager received $110,000 reward for helping crack the case when coworker contacted police officer doing paperwork in restaurant after Donaldson asked her to hold bag containing loaded .40 Glock firearm while alleged serial killer went to nearby business to arrange a payday loan. Police said AT&T cellphone data put him in area of each killing and a hoodie seen in released surveillance videos was found in his Ford Mustang. Sports management major walked onto St. John's team during 2011-12 season when Red Storm coach Steve Lavin missed majority of year recovering from cancer surgery and only had seven scholarship players available. The 6-0 guard never played in a game for the program.

Three seasons later, Lavin's second-leading scorer and assists leader was Rysheed Jordan, who was arrested in early June 2016 and charged with attempted murder and robbery in a shooting in North Philadelphia. According to the police report, Jordan disposed of a gun with a scratched-off serial number while followed by officers. Entering dangerous terrain when comparing cancerous athletes to the public-at-large segment of our population, there is a seemingly congested intersection populating hot hoop prospects who become prime suspects. Rarely exposed to the rigid word "no," some of the hero worshiped think the world revolves around them and develop a sordid sense of "out-of-bounds" entitlement. Many of the misguided go from the brink of the pros to the clink put away.

"When you are among the high-flying adored, your view of the world becomes blurred," wrote psychologist Stanley Teitelbaum of the flouting-of-the-law behavior in the book "Sports Heroes, Fallen Idols: How Star Athletes Pursue Self-Destructive Paths and Jeopardize Their Careers."

"Off the field, some act as if they are above the rules of society; hubris and an attitude of entitlement become central to the psyche of many athletes. They may deny that they are vulnerable to reprisals and feel omnipotent and grandiose as well as entitled."

Far too many depraved derelicts can't resist and make the toxic transition from game-breakers to lawbreakers when seduced by the dark side. There have been a striking number of heart-breaking stories rocking the world of sports, derailing dreams and creating miscreants who are poster boys for bad behavior.

Idaho professor Sharon Stoll was not surprised when sports pages occasionally read like a police blotter focusing on 15 minutes of shame such as former Minnesota guard Daquein McNeil charged with arson in Baltimore in the summer of 2017 in connection with the homicide of a man who happened to be staying at the vacant house.

"In sport, we have moved away from honorable behavior," said Stoll, who operated the Center for Ethical Theory and Honor in Competitive Sports and conducted a 17-year study during which 72,000 athletes filled out questionnaires. "The environment of athletics has not been supportive of teaching and modeling moral knowing, moral valuing and moral action. Many of these young people have no sense of what is acceptable behavior."

It's unnerving when active or former narcissistic players go from the big time breaking ankles to the big house donning ankle bracelets. Infinitely more disconcerting is when deaths are involved amid the life and crimes. Despite some of the repulsive garbage, college hoops is too great a game to be ruined by moral malfeasance including a seven-footer from Duluth, Ga., reportedly recruited by Florida Gulf Coast, North Florida and Winthrop facing serious charges (robbery and assault with intent to commit a crime) in connection to the murder of a man this past fall.

The accompanying "Thugs R Us" summaries, including prominent Seton Hall player from North Philly for Lavin's Fox Sports colleague Bill Raferty, aren't designed to defile hoopdom. Actually, if college basketball can survive such unsavory incidents and classless ambassadors, it must be a helluva sport. At any rate, how many schools wouldn't be tainted if they had just embraced modest academic standards? What went awry for the following alphabetical list of slam dunkers who wound up in the slammer after murder/manslaughter probes?:

Richie Adams, UNLV (coached by Jerry Tarkanian) - A 1989 conviction for larceny and armed robbery led to a five-year prison term for the two-time Big West Conference Tournament MVP. Following his parole, Adams was convicted of manslaughter in September 1998 after being accused of stalking and killing a 14-year-old Bronx girl in a housing project where both lived. The girl's family said Adams attacked her because she rejected his advances. Adams, nicknamed "The Animal" because of his intense playing style, was considered a defensive whiz and led the Rebels in scoring, rebounding and blocked shots for their PCAA champions in 1983-84 and 1984-85. "I used drugs occasionally, when I wanted to do it," Adams said. "When I went to play basketball, if I needed a pain reliever, I would sniff some cocaine." His trouble with the law escalated in 1985, a day after he was drafted in the fourth round by the Washington Bullets, when the two-time All-PCAA first-team selection was arrested for stealing a car. In high school, Adams and several teammates allegedly stole their own coach's auto.

Clifford Allen, UNLV (Jerry Tarkanian) - November 1985 J.C. signee by the Rebels was sentenced to 45 years in prison after pleading no contest to second-degree murder as part of a plea bargain in the 1989 death of a man in Milton, Fla. Allen, a native of Los Angeles, said in a recorded statement that he used a steak knife to kill a 64-year-old guidance counselor after the man allegedly made sexual advances in the counselor's trailer. Allen, driving the victim's auto when he was arrested, enrolled at several jucos and also reportedly considered an offer to play for Tim Floyd at New Orleans.

Justin "Spider" Burns, Cal State Fullerton (Bob Burton) - Two-year starter for the Titans (10.4 ppg and 6.7 rpg in 2005-06 and 2006-07; second-leading rebounder as junior and senior) was arrested in Jackson, Miss., in the spring of 2011 on a murder charge related to the strangulation slaying of his ex-girlfriend the previous fall. Her body was found by target shooters in a valley desert area under a pile of blackened rocks. According to Burns' arrest report, the brother of rapper Jason Douglas Burns (a/k/a WorldWideWebbb) was the last person to be seen with the West Covina, Calif., resident and had argued with her the night before she was killed after coming to Las Vegas to visit him. In the weeks after her burned body was found, his father (former UNLV player Michael "Spiderman" Burns) refused to cooperate with police about his son's whereabouts, the report said.

Javaris Crittenton, Georgia Tech (Paul Hewitt) - All-ACC third-team selection as a freshman in 2006-07 was sentenced to 23 years as part of a plea deal stemming from charges of murder and gang activity. Charged in late August 2011 after a woman was a drive-by shooting victim on a Southeast Atlanta street by someone inside a dark-colored SUV. The mother of four wasn't the intended target in what appeared to be retaliation for a $50,000 robbery of jewelry in the spring when Crittenton was a victim. Crittenton, who pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor gun charge in late January 2010 and received probation, was suspended 38 games by the NBA after he and teammate Gilbert Arenas acknowledged bringing guns into the Washington Wizards locker room following an altercation stemming from a card game on a team flight. While out on bond, Crittenton was arrested in mid-January 2014 in a drug sting taking down more than a dozen persons accused of selling multiple kilos of cocaine and several hundred pounds of marijuana.

Carlton Dotson, Baylor (Dave Bliss) - J.C. recruit was sentenced to 35 years in prison after pleading guilty to murdering Baylor roommate/teammate Patrick Dennehy with a hand gun in the summer of 2003. Dennehy, shot twice above the right ear, was New Mexico's leading rebounder (7.5 rpg) in 2001-02 under coach Fran Fraschilla before he was dismissed from the squad when Ritchie McKay succeeded Fraschilla. Dotson was arrested upon telling FBI agents he shot Dennehy after the player tried to shoot him. Bliss was fired by Baylor, the world's largest Baptist school, before reports surfaced about his direct involvement in a Hall of Shame coverup attempting to hide drug use and NCAA violations within his program by encouraging an assistant coach and Bears players to depict the slain Dennehy as a drug dealer.

Parish Hickman, Michigan State (Jud Heathcote)/Liberty (Jeff Meyer) - Spartans regular for three seasons before transferring and becoming Liberty's second-leading scorer and rebounder in 1992-93 pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to 3-to-15 years in prison for the January 2001 murder of a Detroit man outside a Westside gas station. Acquitted after appearing before a federal judge on cocaine charges in the spring of 1991 following his on-campus arrest at MSU.

Baskerville Holmes, Memphis State (Dana Kirk) - A starting forward who averaged 9.6 points and 5.9 rebounds per game for the Tigers' 1985 Final Four team, he was arrested twice for domestic violence. Later, Holmes, an out-of-work truck driver, and his girlfriend were found shot to death March 18, 1997, in an apparent murder-suicide in Memphis. He was 32.

LaKeith Humphrey, Kansas State (Lon Kruger)/Central Missouri State (Jim Wooldridge) - Sentenced to life in prison after being convicted of first-degree murder in the late November 2006 death of his former girlfriend, who was shot through her bedroom window about 3:40 a.m. in his hometown of Memphis. Humphrey, a J.C. recruit, averaged 12.6 ppg and 3.6 apg for K-State's NCAA playoff team in 1988-89.

Joeviair Kennedy, Western Michigan (Steve Hawkins) - Faced murder and armed robbery charges in the shooting death of a student at an off-campus apartment in December 2016 robbery where he and a co-defendant allegedly got marijuana, a cellphone and about $25. Kennedy, a 6-4 redshirt guard who averaged 3.1 ppg in eight contests, said a former Muskegon high school teammate pulled the trigger.

William Langrum II, McLennan County Community College TX - Starting power forward and H.S. teammate of Georgia Tech/NBA star Chris Bosh on Texas' 4A state championship club in 2002 (declared national champion by USA Today) faced life in prison after charged with capital murder in the fall of 2011 after a 50-year-old woman was stabbed to death in an apparent robbery outside her Dallas-area condominium as she returned from church. In the aftermath of killing her, Langrum and an accomplice went to a different portion of Dallas and began stalking another potential victim before police arrested them. Coincidentally, Bosh's mother was the subject of a drug trafficking probe in December 2017.

Leonel Marquetti, Southern California (Bob Boyd and Stan Morrison)/Hampton (Hank Ford) - Former McDonald's All-American was sentenced to life in prison without parole after being found guilty of first-degree murder in a March 25, 2010, slaying in Plant City, Fla. Prosecutors portrayed Marquetti as a hoarder who was jealous of a wrongly-assumed relationship with an ex-girlfriend, a German-born dog breeder. Marquetti shot a white handyman four times - once as he faced him and three times as his victim lay facedown. Jurors also found him guilty of aggravated battery with a firearm and false imprisonment. The Los Angeles native averaged 4.8 ppg in 1978-79 and 1979-80 with USC before transferring.

Howard McNeil, Seton Hall (Bill Raftery) - Convicted at Norristown, Pa., in early February 1999 of third-degree murder in the stabbing death of a suspected prostitute. Police said the woman's skull was cracked when she was pushed into a wall before being stabbed to death. According to prosecutors, McNeil also stole a safe filled with drugs from the house. McNeil, an All-Big East Conference third-team selection as a junior in 1980-81, was found guilty of related drug and theft charges, but not convicted on more serious first- and second-degree murder charges. In 1976, he shot a friend in the head with a handgun at a Valentine's Day party, but was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter and avoided jail.

Branden Miller, Montana State (Mick Durham) - Sentenced to 120 years in prison (100 for deliberate homicide, 10 for use of a weapon and 10 for tampering with evidence) after being charged with murder in late June 2006 in the shooting death of a suspected cocaine dealer whose body was found at the school's agronomy farm. Investigators said the murder weapon was one of two .40-caliber handguns Miller bought from a pawn shop two weeks before the incident. He was the Bobcats' third-leading scorer in 2004-05 before becoming academically ineligible.

Mike Niles, Cal State Fullerton (Bobby Dye) - After playing briefly with the Phoenix Suns, the enforcer for the Titans' 1978 West Regional finalist before being booted from the squad due to academic anemia was convicted in late January 1989 of hiring a man to murder his wife and served a life sentence without the possibility of parole. She died of a shotgun blast to the back of her skull from close range. The prosecution contended that Niles arranged to pay $5,000 to kill his wife, a prison guard, to collect $100,000 from a life insurance policy. A witness testified that Niles said he wanted his wife killed because she "messed me out" of money from basketball. The cycle of violence continued when his aspiring rapper son, Brandon, was buried at 17, the victim of a gunshot to the chest by a rival gang.

Stephen O'Reilly, North Florida (Matthew Driscoll) - Virgin Islands product who played briefly for UNF in 2009-10 was charged in the fatal stabbing of his roommate in Gwinnett County, Ga., in late March 2013.

Terry Pettis, Fresno State (Ray Lopes) - Sentenced to life in prison without parole for first-degree murder and armed robbery in the death of a junior college student who was behind the wheel of a car while her boyfriend sold marijuana in the seat next to her. Pettis had been arrested in his hometown of Minneapolis in May 2004 on charges of killing the woman when she tried to drive away during a botched drug robbery the previous month in Fresno, Calif., at a secluded lot near an apartment building. The crime was so grisly that the judge decided jurors couldn't see an autopsy photo showing the bullet's impact on the teenager's head. Pettis, a starting point guard for the Bulldogs in 2002-03 and 2003-04 before he was suspended for not completing a treatment program, pleaded no contest in September 2003 to misdemeanor vandalism and battery charges involving his girlfriend.

Andre Smith, Xavier (Skip Prosser) - Son of Tulsa All-American Bingo Smith was sentenced to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to voluntary manslaughter and tampering with evidence as part of a plea deal. Prosecutors say he used a survival tool that included a machete and a saw to kill his Russian teenage friend in May 2004 in his apartment complex. Andre played for the Musketeers in the mid-1990s.

Brett Studdard, Wyoming (Benny Dees) - J.C. recruit who averaged 4.3 ppg for the Cowboys in 1991-92 and 1992-93 shot his former girlfriend to death (once in the back and once in the head) before committing suicide in the fall of 2003 in Cobb County (Ga.). The altercation occurred two days after a permanent restraining order was issued prohibiting him from contacting the pharmacist.

Decensae White, Texas Tech (Bob Knight)/Santa Clara (Kerry Keating)/San Francisco State (Paul Trevor) - Arrested on a murder charge as part of an elaborate plot, including a Russian mobster, where a Louisiana rapper (Lil Phat) was killed in a revenge drive-by shooting the summer of 2012 in the parking deck of a hospital as his fiancee was preparing to give birth. White, extradited to Georgia in May 2013 before striking a deal with the prosecution, testified he was the one tracking Lil Phat's movements (after stealing 10 pounds of marijuana) via a GPS device installed in a rented white Audi vehicle. The vagabond hoopster averaged 4.7 ppg and 2.2 rpg for Texas Tech in 2006-07 and 2007-08, 3.4 ppg and 2.4 rpg in 10 games with Santa Clara in 2008-09 and team highs of 12.5 ppg and 7.1 rpg for San Francisco State in 2012-13.

Jayson Williams, St. John's (Lou Carnesecca) - All-Big East Conference second-team selection in 1988-89 pleaded guilty in January 2010 to aggravated assault and served 18 months in prison for accidentally killing a limousine driver in his bedroom. Williams, boasting 25 stitches above his right eye after being charged with drunken driving when crashing his SUV into a tree the previous week, was awaiting retrial on a reckless manslaughter count before pleading guilty to to the lesser count. He had been cleared by jurors in the spring of 2004 of aggravated manslaughter, the most serious charge against him, but was found guilty of four lesser charges. He faced 55 years in prison if convicted on all counts stemming from a February 14, 2002, shooting with a 12-gauge shotgun of a limo driver at his mansion and an alleged attempt to make the death look like a suicide. Williams was acquitted of aggravated manslaughter, but the jury deadlocked on a reckless-manslaughter count. Williams gave the driver's relatives $2.5 million to settle a civil suit. In late April 2009 following his wife filing for divorce claiming he was abusive, adulterous and had a drug problem, Williams was zapped with a stun gun by police in a lower Manhattan hotel suite after the reportedly suicidal athlete resisted attempts by officers to take him to a hospital. The next month, he was charged with assault after allegedly punching a man in the face outside a North Carolina bar, but charges were dropped.

Oscar Williams Jr., Utah State (Dutch Belnap) - The Aggies' assists leader in multiple categories from his mid-1970s exploits was sentenced to two life prison terms without the possibility of parole for the 1982 shooting death of his wife. Prosecutors contended that he murdered her to collect $220,000 worth of life insurance benefits after he failed in an effort to hire a contract killer. Toy Williams, a 24-year-old model, was shot at least five times in an alley near the couple's Las Vegas apartment after returning from her job at a nearby shopping mall.

Roy Williams, Cleveland State (Kevin Mackey and Mike Boyd) - J.C. recruit was suspended while facing a rape charge stemming from an on-campus incident at a fraternity party involving an honor student in early November 1990. He was questioned by California authorities the previous year about the suspicious death of a Compton College female student, whose body was found in the trunk of her gray Toyota car. Williams, the last person seen with her according to police, initially told investigators the student body vice president and peer counselor overdosed at a San Diego crack house the two had visited. In the spring of 1991, he pleaded innocent to charges of killing two young women and raping and attempting to strangle a third female. An attorney defending him threatened to sue over disclosure that his client was convicted of murder in California in 1981 when he was 14 and reportedly served nearly five years in California youth institutions.

Home Sour Home: Ducking Power-Member List Never Winning 30 Straight

Oregon's school-record homecourt winning string extended to 46 in a row before bowing to Boise State on a half-court shot. Prior to last season, UO was on a dubious list of prominent programs failing ever to win 30 straight on their home floor. Did you know power-conference members Arizona State, Baylor, Butler, California, Clemson, Colorado, Creighton, Florida State, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Iowa, Kansas State, Louisville, Maryland, Miami FL, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Northwestern, Oregon State, Rutgers, Southern California, Stanford, Texas, Texas Christian, Vanderbilt, Virginia Tech, Wake Forest and Washington State never have won as many as 30 consecutive home contests?

Maryland had a chance to reach 30 a couple of seasons ago before Wisconsin became the first Big Ten Conference member to prevail at UM in league competition after the Terrapins joined the loop by breaking their school-record 27-game homecourt winning streak. Which opponents broke school-record home-court winning streaks of at least 30 games? Oddly, more than half of the aforementioned power-league schools are in this category, including Texas on three occasions (ended school-record HC streaks for Arkansas, Kansas and Texas A&M). Following is an alphabetical list including schools crossing the 30-game homecourt winning streak threshold:

School Record Streak Date Started Date Ended Opponent Ending School-Record Home-court Streak Score
Alabama 54 1-??-29 1-??-35 Vanderbilt 44-33
Arizona 81 12-14-45 12-8-51 Kansas State 76-57
Arkansas 32 1-17-76 1-12-79 Texas 66-63
Auburn 36 1-26-57 1-7-61 Mississippi State 56-48
Austin Peay 31 1-25-75 3-5-77 Middle Tennessee State 77-65 in OVC Tournament final
Bradley 46 1-23-58 2-6-61 Drake 86-76
Brigham Young 53 11-26-05 1-3-09 Wake Forest 94-87
Charlotte 60 2-28-74 12-5-77 Appalachian State 71-64
Cincinnati 86 12-6-57 12-7-63 Kansas 51-47
College of Charleston 38 1-9-95 12-28-97 Rider 65-58
Columbia 34 1949 1-16-52 Penn 66-64
Connecticut 31 2-21-05 1-10-07 Marquette 73-69
Coppin State 42 12-19-92 1-15-97 North Carolina A&T 76-70
Dartmouth 38 2-3-37 2-17-40 Army 44-36
Davidson 57 2-12-62 12-11-72 Furman 93-86
Dayton 30 3-8-08 1-26-10 Rhode Island 65-64
DePaul 36 1-21-83 1-21-85 Dayton 67-63
Detroit 39 1-28-99 2-10-02 Wisconsin-Green Bay 65-61
Duke 46 1-13-97 2-9-00 Maryland 98-87
Florida 33 11-11-12 11-17-14 Miami FL 69-67
Gonzaga 50 11-21-03 2-12-07 Santa Clara 84-73
Houston 59 1-13-64 12-21-68 Illinois 97-84
Idaho 43 1-17-80 2-12-83 Montana 80-61
Illinois 33 1-17-04 2-4-06 Penn State 66-65
Illinois State 31 1-25-77 1-27-79 DePaul 87-69
Indiana 35 11-23-73 12-6-76 Kentucky 66-51
Iowa State 39 2-16-99 1-12-02 Oklahoma State 69-66
Jacksonville 35 1-13-69 12-7-71 Florida State 90-83
Kansas 69 2-7-07 1-22-11 Texas 74-63
Kentucky 129 1-4-43 1-8-55 Georgia Tech 59-58
Lamar 80 2-18-78 3-10-84 Louisiana Tech 68-65 in SLC Tournament
Long Beach State 75 11-20-68 12-4-74 San Francisco 94-84 in OT
Louisiana State 42 2-??-16 2-18-21 Mississippi 23-22
Louisiana Tech 39 12-6-82 11-25-85 Stephen F. Austin 67-58
Louisiana Tech 39 12-7-13 1-7-16 Old Dominion 56-53
Loyola of Chicago 41 2-25-61 12-31-64 St. Louis 90-57
Marquette 81 12-17-66 1-13-73 Notre Dame 71-69
Massachusetts 33 1-16-93 2-14-95 George Washington 80-78
Memphis 47 1-4-06 2-22-08 Tennessee 66-62
Michigan State 53 11-13-98 1-12-02 Wisconsin 64-63
Middle Tennessee State 33 12-11-73 1-7-76 UT Chattanooga 83-72
Minnesota 40 2-9-01 1-20-05 Nebraska 22-21
Mississippi State 35 1-14-57 1-2-60 Auburn 64-48
Missouri 34 3-3-88 12-8-90 Arkansas 95-82
Murray State 47 11-23-96 1-15-00 Southeast Missouri State 84-78
New Mexico 41 2-10-96 2-26-98 Brigham Young 83-62
New Mexico State 34 12-16-68 12-1-71 Angelo State TX 77-71
New Orleans 38 12-12-69 2-28-72 Louisiana Tech 80-73
Niagara 51 1943 2-8-50 Syracuse 60-55
North Carolina A&T 37 1985-86 11-30-88 North Carolina Central 66-54
North Carolina Central 38 1-8-13 12-7-15 Howard 71-69
North Carolina State 38 2-19-72 2-1-75 Maryland 98-97
North Dakota State 31 2-14-13 1-7-16 Omaha 91-82
Notre Dame 45 3-4-06 1-24-09 Connecticut 69-61
Ohio State 50 12-1-59 12-11-63 Davidson 95-73
Oklahoma 51 11-28-87 12-22-90 Duke 90-85
Oklahoma State 49 1-9-36 12-21-40 Southern California 28-25
Old Dominion 32 2-27-14 1-14-16 UAB 72-71 in OT
Oral Roberts 52 2-17-69 2-10-73 Marshall 106-103
Oregon 46 1-10-15 12-1-17 Boise State 73-70
Pacific 45 3-8-69 1-7-73 Long Beach State 91-85
Penn 34 2-7-69 12-18-71 Temple 57-52
Penn State 45 1-20-51 3-2-55 Penn 85-79
Pepperdine 30 11-27-84 12-11-86 Long Beach State 86-77
Pittsburgh 40 1-19-02 2-29-04 Syracuse 49-46 in OT
Providence 55 2-13-71 12-28-74 St. John's 91-79
Purdue 30 12-22-67 2-28-70 Iowa 108-107
St. Bonaventure 99 1948 2-25-61 Niagara 87-77
St. John's 30 11-30-84 2-14-87 Providence 79-78
Saint Joseph's 34 1956-57 12-16-66 Fairfield 82-68
Seton Hall 46 1-10-51 1-1-54 William & Mary 57-55
Siena 38 2-29-08 11-13-10 Vermont 80-76
South Carolina 34 1-12-72 2-16-74 Notre Dame 72-68
Southern Illinois 33 1-11-04 2-1-06 Indiana State 63-54
Southern Methodist 44 2-??-54 3-1-58 Texas A&M 43-42
Stephen F. Austin 34 2-18-12 11-18-14 Northern Iowa 79-77 in OT
Syracuse 57 3-5-76 2-13-80 Georgetown 52-50
Temple 33 1-21-84 2-24-87 West Virginia 64-61
Tennessee 37 11-10-06 1-7-09 Gonzaga 89-79 in OT
Tennessee Tech 33 12-2-00 1-4-03 Morehead State 72-70
Texas A&M 30 1-15-60 2-5-63 Texas 70-59
Texas-El Paso 31 1-23-88 12-16-89 Indiana 69-66
Texas Tech 35 2-9-94 1-11-97 Colorado 80-78
Tulane 42 2-20-46 12-10-49 Arkansas 42-41
Tulsa 36 2-23-80 12-7-82 Oklahoma State 93-75
UCLA 98 12-4-70 2-21-76 Oregon 65-45
UNLV 72 2-8-74 1-7-78 New Mexico 102-98
Utah 54 1-4-97 12-9-00 Weber State 79-77
Utah State 37 11-9-07 12-5-09 Saint Mary's 68-63
Villanova 72 12-6-47 3-4-58 Saint Francis PA 70-64
Virginia 34 2-6-80 1-15-83 North Carolina 101-95
Virginia Commonwealth 33 12-18-76 2-10-78 Virginia Tech 71-63
Virginia Military 35 2-5-76 1-17-79 Appalachian State 73-58
Washington 32 1-29-04 12-31-05 Arizona 96-95 in 2OT
Weber State 44 2-8-63 2-11-67 Idaho 68-67
Western Kentucky 67 2-5-49 1-10-55 Xavier 82-80 in OT
West Virginia 39 12-10-80 1-20-83 St. Bonaventure 64-63
Wichita State 43 11-9-13 2-13-16 Northern Iowa 53-50
Wisconsin 38 12-7-02 1-25-05 Illinois 75-65
Xavier 30 12-31-08 12-31-10 Florida 71-67

G-Men Leave Historically Black Mark on Tech's Previously-Proud Program

There goes the neighborhood. Are we sure UCLA's opening-season opponent wasn't the school having multiple prominent players imprisoned in China? Josh Pastner's coaching stint at Georgia Tech doesn't appear as if it will be much more than a "rambling" wreck, let alone returning to the Final Four. A 64-63 defeat at home against Grambling after barely beating Bethune-Cookman is not what "tipsy" (into wrong basket) Tech fans had in mind when previously-promising Pastner arrived on campus.

The embarrassing setback, leaving a historically black mark as it was the Tigers' first win against a NCAA DI opponent from outside the MEAC and SWAC in almost seven years, represented another power-conference member succumbing at home against a HBCU (Historically Black College or University). Keep in mind the G-Men averaged a grotesque 6 1/2 wins annually the previous 10 campaigns (including winless season in 2012-13).

Last year, Oregon State bowed to a HBCU opponent for the third time this decade. No HBCU institution ever has reached Sweet 16 of an NCAA Tournament, but following are additional HBCU road victories on a power league member's homecourt or neutral court during regular-season competition since South Carolina State stunned Miami (Fla.) and Penn State in 2004-05:

Season HBCU Winner on Road Power League Member Loser Competence of Power League School Incurring Defeat
2004-05 South Carolina State 60 Miami (Fla.) 50 Hurricanes won at NCAA playoff-bound Florida.
2004-05* South Carolina State 63 Penn State 43 Nittany Lions lost by three points against 20-game winner Ohio State in Big Ten Tournament.
2005-06 Bethune-Cookman 75 South Florida 68 Bulls beat NCAA playoff-bound Georgetown in regular-season finale.
2006-07 Jackson State 71 Rutgers 70 Scarlet Knights twice defeated Cincinnati.
2007-08 Tennessee State 60 Illinois 58 Illini beat Oklahoma State and Missouri in nonconference competition before bowing to TSU.
2008-09 Morgan State 79 DePaul 75 Blue Demons defeated Cincinnati (18-14) in Big East Tournament.
2008-09 Morgan State 66 Maryland 65 Terrapins participated in NCAA Tournament.
2009-10 Morgan State 97 Arkansas 94 Razorbacks prevailed at Ole Miss, a 24-game winner.
2010-11 Texas Southern 66 Oregon State 60 Beavers beat 30-game winner Arizona.
2011-12 Tennessee State 64 South Carolina 63 Gamecocks upended Clemson, Alabama and Georgia.
2012-13 Alabama A&M 59 Mississippi State 57 Bulldogs beat Marshall Henderson-led Ole Miss and twice defeated Frank Martin-coached South Carolina.
2012-13 Southern (La.) 53 Texas A&M 51 Aggies won at Kentucky in inaugural SEC season and also beat NCAA playoff-bound Mizzou.
2013-14 Coppin State 78 Oregon State 73 Beavers bow to second HBCU school under coach Craig Robinson in last four seasons before winning at Maryland.
2013-14 North Carolina Central 82 North Carolina State 72 Wolfpack suffered first-ever defeat against a MEAC member.
2013-14 Texas Southern 90 Temple 89 Owls defeated UAB on neutral court by 21 points before the Blazers beat North Carolina, which whipped three PS Top 5 teams (Louisville, Michigan State and Kentucky).
2014-15 Delaware State 72 Wake Forest 65 Demon Deacons defeated North Carolina State and Pittsburgh.
2015-16 Alabama State 85 Virginia Tech 82 Hokies defeated eventual NCAA regional #1 seed Virginia.
2015-16 Southern (La.) 76 Mississippi State 72 Bulldogs defeated Arkansas by 32 points.
2016-17 Delaware State 79 St. John's 72 Red Storm won on road against NCAA playoff-bound Syracuse and Providence.
2016-17 Savannah State 93 Oregon State 90 Beavers beat NCAA Tournament-bound Utah.

*Neutral court (Milwaukee).

On This Date: December Calendar of Most Memorable NCAA Hoops Games

Did You Know?: Marquee mentors John Beilein (Canisius), Vic Bubas (Duke), Denny Crum (Louisville), Bob Knight (Army), Guy Lewis (Houston), Ralph Miller (Wichita), Digger Phelps (Notre Dame) and Jerry Tarkanian (UNLV) lost their head coaching debuts with these schools between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Trivia buffs might also want to know bitter rivals Kentucky and Louisville each had their school rebounding record by an individual set on the same day in 1955.

Prominent players don't establish most of the school standards against lesser lights in non-conference competition. For instance, Utah's Billy McGill and Illinois' Skip Thoren set school single-game rebounding records in the early 1960s when each of them retrieved 24 missed shots against UCLA before the Bruins began their run of NCAA titles under legendary coach John Wooden.

Granted, fewer contests are played around Christmas but there clearly is a significant decrease in superior performances during that span. Holiday festivities can go awry between Christmas and New Year's Eve. Just ask top-ranked Virginia, which lost at tiny Chaminade in 1982, and NCAA champion-to-be Michigan, which bowed to Alaska-Anchorage on a neutral court in 1988. Following is a day-by-day calendar citing memorable moments in December college basketball history:

DECEMBER
1 - Eastern Kentucky's Jack Adams (49 points vs. Union in 1955), Iona's A.J. English (46 vs. Fairfield in 2015), Louisville's Wes Unseld (45 vs. Georgetown College KY in 1967) and NYU's Jim Signorile (50 vs. Herbert Lehman NY in 1969) set school Division I single-game scoring records. English's output tied a MAAC game mark. . . . Ronnie Shavlik (55 points vs. William & Mary in 1954 set North Carolina State's single-game scoring record against a major-college opponent. . . . Vic Bubas made his Duke head coaching debut in 1959 with a 59-49 loss against Georgia Tech before guiding the Blue Devils to three Final Fours in a four-year span in the mid-1960s. . . . Pete Carril made his Princeton debut in 1967 with a 62-59 win against Army en route to becoming the Tigers' all-time winningest coach and capturing the Ivy League's only NIT championship (1975). . . . Denny Crum made his Louisville head coaching debut in 1971 with a 70-69 defeat at Florida before amassing a school-record 675 victories. . . . Eddie Sutton made his Creighton head coaching debut in 1969 with an 84-62 decision over Wisconsin-Oshkosh en route to 802 victories with five schools. . . . Jerry Tarkanian made his UNLV head coaching debut in 1973 with an 82-76 defeat against Texas Tech before notching a school-record 509 victories with the Rebels. . . . Ralph Miller made his Wichita head coaching debut in 1951 with a 62-55 defeat at Colorado before registering 657 victories with three schools. . . . Guy Lewis made his Houston head coaching debut in 1956 with a 97-78 defeat at Kansas State before compiling a school-record 592 victories. . . . Al McGuire made his Marquette debut in 1964 with a 69-49 triumph over St. Thomas MN en route to becoming the Warriors' all-time winningest coach. . . . Bob Knight made his Indiana debut in 1971 with an 84-77 triumph over Ball State en route to becoming the Hoosiers' all-time winningest coach. . . . Digger Phelps made his Notre Dame debut in 1971 with a 101-83 defeat against Michigan before compiling a school-record 393 victories. . . . Frank McGuire made his South Carolina coaching debut in 1964 with a 76-59 triumph against Erskine SC en route to a school-record 283 victories. . . . John Beilein made his Canisius coaching debut in 1992 with a 110-62 defeat at Duke before going on to win more than 20 games in a single season with four different DI schools. . . . Bob Nichols made his Toledo coaching debut in 1965 with a 108-77 triumph against Baldwin-Wallace OH en route to a school-record 375 victories. . . . Oregon's school-record 46-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Boise State (73-70 in 2017). . . . Lynn Howden (24 vs. Florida State in 1970) set Texas' single-game rebounding record against a major-college opponent.
2 - Eventual NCAA all-time scoring leader Pete Maravich collected 48 points and career-high 16 rebounds in his LSU varsity debut (97-81 win against Tampa in 1967). . . . Northern Arizona's Cory Schwab (43 points at Cal Poly in overtime in 2000) and Wisconsin's Christian Steinmetz (50 at Sparta's Company C in 1904) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Dean Smith made his North Carolina head coaching debut in 1961 with an 80-46 decision over Virginia en route to a school-record 879 victories. . . . Norm Stewart made his Missouri head coaching debut in 1967 with a 74-58 success at Arkansas en route to a school-record 634 victories with the Tigers. . . . Don Haskins made his Texas Western head coaching debut in 1961 with a 66-59 triumph at Iowa State en route to a school-record 719 victories. . . . Terry Holland made his Virginia coaching debut in 1974 with a 77-69 victory against Washington & Lee VA en route to a school-record 326 victories. . . . Phil Martelli made his Saint Joseph's debut in 1995 with a 64-56 success at Delaware en route to becoming the Hawks' all-time winningest coach and national COY in 2004.
3 - Wisconsin-Milwaukee's Von McDade (50 points at Illinois in double overtime in 1990) set school single-game scoring record. . . . DeWayne Russell (42 vs. Louisville in 2016) set Grand Canyon's DI single-game scoring record. . . . Lew Alcindor collected 56 points and 21 rebounds vs. Southern California in his varsity debut with UCLA in 1966. . . . John Wooden made his UCLA head coaching debut in 1948 with a 43-37 decision over UC Santa Barbara en route to a school-record 620 victories with the Bruins. . . . Lefty Driesell made his Davidson head coaching debut in 1960 with a 65-59 decision over Wake Forest en route to 786 victories with four schools. . . . Everett Case made his North Carolina State coaching debut in 1946 with a 63-28 decision over the Cherry Point Marines en route to a school-record 377 victories with the Wolfpack. . . . Arizona State's Mark Landsberger (27 vs. San Diego State in 1976), Jacksonville's Artis Gilmore (34 vs. St. Peter's in 1970) and UMKC's Tony Berg (23 vs. Baylor in 1996) set school single-game rebounding records.
4 - Mississippi State's Bailey Howell (47 points vs. Union TN in 1958) and Northwestern State's Billy Reynolds (42 at Lamar in 1976) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Brown's Ed Tooley shot an NCAA-record 36 free throws in a single game in 1954. . . . Long Beach State's school-record 75-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by San Francisco (94-84 in overtime in 1974). . . . Lou Carnesecca made his St. John's coaching debut in 1965 with a 64-62 triumph at Georgetown in overtime en route to a school-record 526 victories. . . . Bob Knight made his Army head coaching debut in 1965 with a 70-49 setback at Princeton before becoming Indiana's all-time winningest coach, capturing three NCAA championships with the Hoosiers in a 12-year span and compiling 899 victories. . . . UCLA's season-opening defeat by 27 points (110-83 at Illinois in 1964) was worst-ever for a team going on to capture an NCAA championship. . . . Marv Branstrom (28 vs. Arizona State in 1958) set San Jose State's single-game rebounding record.
5 - Kansas' Wilt Chamberlain (52 points vs. Northwestern in 1956), North Carolina State's David Thompson (57 vs. Buffalo State in 1974), Rider's Ron Simpson (48 at St. Francis NY in double overtime in 1987) and Washington State's Brian Quinnett (45 vs. Loyola Marymount in 1986 Amana Hawkeye Classic at Iowa City) set school Division I single-game scoring records. Chamberlain also grabbed 31 rebounds in his varsity debut, establishing an NCAA standard for most boards in first career game. . . . Charlotte's school-record 60-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Appalachian State (71-64 in 1977). . . . Dale Brown made his LSU head coaching debut in 1972 with a 94-81 triumph against Memphis State en route to a school-record 448 victories. . . . Harry Combes made his Illinois coaching debut in 1947 with a 67-27 success against Coe College IA before directing the Illini to three Final Fours in a four-year span from 1949 through 1952. . . . Shelby Metcalf made his Texas A&M head coaching debut in 1963 with a 61-58 triumph against Houston en route to a school-record 438 victories. . . . Gene Estes (24 vs. Texas Western in 1960) set Tulsa's single-game rebounding record against a major-college opponent.
6 - American's Russell "Boo" Bowers (45 points at Harvard in 1980), Nebraska-Omaha's Devin Patterson (41 at Montana State in 2015), Old Dominion's Alex Loughton (45 vs. Charlotte in double overtime in 2003), Rice's Doug McKendrick (47 vs. Georgia Tech in 1965) and Texas-San Antonio's Roderic Hall (52 vs. Maine in consolation game of 1997 Southwest Missouri Tournament at Springfield, Mo.) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Kent State's Doug Grayson set an NCAA single-game record by hitting 16 consecutive field-goal attempts vs. North Carolina in 1967. . . . Indiana's school-record 35-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Kentucky (66-51 in 1976). . . . Bob Presley (27 vs. St. Mary's in 1967) set California's single-game rebounding record.
7 - Niagara's Calvin Murphy (68 points vs. Syracuse in 1968) and St. Mary's Jim Moore (43 vs. Sacramento State in 1964) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Forest Arnold (46 points vs. Hardin-Simmons in 1955) set Memphis State's single-game scoring record against a major-college opponent. . . . Cincinnati's school-record 86-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Kansas (51-47 in 1963), Jacksonville's school-record 35-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Florida State (90-83 in 1971) and Tulsa's school-record 36-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Oklahoma State (93-75 in 1982). . . . Benny Becton (29 vs. Maine in 1962) set Vermont's single-game rebounding record.
8 - Davidson's Fred Hetzel (53 points vs. Furman in 1964), Morgan State's James McCoy (38 vs. Georgia State in semifinals of 1989 Godfather's Pizza Classic at Chattanooga, Tenn.), Rutgers' Bob Lloyd (51 at Delaware in 1965) and Wright State's Bill Edwards (45 vs. Morehead State in 1992) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Arizona's school-record 81-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Kansas State (76-57 in 1951) and Missouri's school-record 34-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Arkansas (95-82 in 1990). . . . Colgate's Jack Nichols (26 vs. Cornell in 1956) and Missouri State's Lee Campbell (20 vs. Southern Utah State in 1989) set school single-game rebounding records against DI opponents.
9 - Tony Bolds (41 points vs. Alcorn State in opening round of 1983 Great Busch Shootout at Southern Illinois) set Mercer's Division I single-game scoring record. . . . Utah's school-record 54-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Weber State (79-77 in 2000). . . . Butler's Jeff Blue (23 vs. Michigan in 1961), College of Charleston's Thaddeous Delaney (21 vs. Charleston Southern in 1995), Dayton's Garry Roggenburk (32 vs. Miami Ohio in 1959), Iowa State's Bill Cain (26 vs. Minnesota in 1969), Lafayette's Ron Moyer (33 vs. Gettysburg PA in 1970) and Towson's Junior Hairston (21 vs. Niagara in 2007) set school single-game rebounding records against Division I opponents.
10 - Duke's Danny Ferry (58 points at Miami FL in 1988) and Long Beach State's Ed Ratleff (45 vs. St. Mary's in 1970) set school single-game scoring records. . . . Troy State (28 of 74) and George Mason (16 of 34) combined to set NCAA single-game three-point field-goal records in 1994 for shots made and attempted beyond the arc with Troy State's figures establishing marks for one team. . . . Tulane's school-record 42-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Arkansas (42-41 in 1949). . . . Bucknell's Hal Danzig (29 vs. Lehigh in 1958), Colorado State's Mike Childress (26 vs. Rice in 1970), George Washington's Clyde Burwell (33 vs. Mount St. Mary's in 1973), Kentucky's Bob Burrow (34 vs. Temple in 1955) and Louisville's Charlie Tyra (38 vs. Canisius in 1955) set school single-game rebounding records.
11 - North Carolina A&T's Joe Binion (41 points vs. Livingstone NC in final of 1982 Miller Aggie Classic) and Virginia's Barry Parkhill (51 vs. Baldwin-Wallace OH in 1971) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Louisville's Clifford Rozier set an NCAA single-game record by hitting all 15 of his field-goal attempts against Eastern Kentucky in 1993. . . . Ohio State's school-record 50-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Davidson (95-73 in 1963). . . . Marvin Barnes (28 vs. Fairfield in 1972) set Providence's single-game rebounding record against a DI opponent.
12 - Alabama's Mike Nordholz (50 points vs. Southern Mississippi at 1966 Birmingham Classic), North Dakota State's Ben Woodside (60 vs. Stephen F. Austin in 2008), Radford's Doug Day (43 at Central Connecticut State in 1990), Southern's Tim Roberts (56 vs. Faith Baptist LA in 1994) and Texas Christian's Lee Nailon (53 vs. Mississippi Valley State in first round of 1997 TCU Tournament) set school single-game scoring records. Woodside tied an NCAA mark by converting free throws against SFA. . . . Oklahoma's Mookie Blaylock set an NCAA single-game record with 13 steals vs. Centenary in 1987. . . . Henry "Hank" Iba made his Oklahoma A&M head coaching debut in 1934 with a 24-17 decision over Wichita en route to a school-record 655 victories with the Cowboys. . . . Kent State's Leroy Thompson (31 vs. Case Western OH in 1948) and Weber State's Willie Sojourner (25 vs. West Texas State in 1969) set school single-game rebounding records.
13 - Evansville's inaugural year at the NCAA Division I level ended in tragedy in 1977 when coach Bobby Watson and 13 members of his Purple Aces squad perished in a plane crash shortly after taking off en route to their fifth game of the season. . . . Southern Mississippi's Jerome Arnold (41 points vs. Missouri-Kansas City in 1978), Toledo's Clarke "Pinky" Pittenger (49 at Bluffton OH in 1918) and Tulsa's Willie Biles (48 vs. St. Cloud State MN in 1973) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Phog Allen made his Kansas head coaching debut in 1907 with a 66-22 decision over Ottawa KS en route to a school-record 590 victories with the Jayhawks. . . . Bradley's Barney Cable (28 vs. Canisius in 1955), Eastern Kentucky's Garfield Smith (33 vs. Marshall in 1967) and UALR's Rashad Jones-Jennings (30 vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff in 2005) set school single-game rebounding records against a DI opponent.
14 - Marshall's Keith Veney set an NCAA single-game record for three-pointers (making 15-of-25 shots from beyond arc vs. Morehead State in 1996).
15 - UC Irvine's Kevin Magee (46 points vs. Loyola Marymount in 1981) and Providence's Marvin Barnes (52 vs. Austin Peay in 1973) set school single-game scoring records. . . . In 1973, Tennessee topped Temple, 11-6, in the lowest-scoring game since introduction of national postseason competition in 1938. . . . La Salle's Michael Brooks set the East Coast Conference single-game scoring record with 51 points at Brigham Young in 1979. . . . Jack Friel made his Washington State debut in 1928 with a 62-18 decision over Lewis-Clark State ID en route to becoming the Cougars' all-time winningest coach. . . . Cal State Fullerton's Kerry Davis (27 vs. Central Michigan in 1975), Colgate's Dick Osborn (26 vs. Yale in 1951), Texas A&M's Vernon Smith and Rynn Wright (21 vs. UNLV in 1978) and Utah State's Wayne Estes (28 vs. Regis CO in 1962) set school single-game rebounding records against DI opponents.
16 - Cal State Fullerton's Bobby Brown (47 points vs. Bethune-Cookman in 2006), Creighton's Bob Portman (51 vs. Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1967), Murray State's Marcus Brown (45 vs. Washington MO in 1995) and North Carolina's Bob Lewis (49 vs. Florida State in 1965) set school single-game scoring records. . . . In 2000, Illinois guard Cory Bradford set an NCAA record by hitting a three-point field goal in his 74th of 88 consecutive games. . . . St. Joseph's school-record 34-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Fairfield (82-68 in 1966) and Texas-El Paso's school-record 31-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Indiana (69-66 in 1989). . . . Florida State's Dave Cowens (31 vs. LSU in 1967), Mercer's Scott Farley (22 vs. Alabama in 1995), SMU's Ira Terrell (26 vs. New Mexico State in 1975) and UTEP's Jim Barnes (27 vs. Centenary in 1963) set school single-game rebounding records against a major-college opponent.
17 - Furman senior swingman Darrell Floyd set a Southern Conference single-game record with 62 points vs. The Citadel in 1955. . . . Oklahoma's Mookie Blaylock tied his NCAA single-game record with 13 steals vs. Loyola Marymount in 1988. . . . Cincinnati's LaZelle Durden set the Great Midwest Conference single-game scoring record with 45 points at Wyoming in 1994. . . . Illinois ended visiting San Francisco's school-record 60-game winning streak (62-33 in 1957). . . . Denver's Dick Brott (29 vs. Southern California in 1956) and Furman's Bob Thomas (35 vs. The Citadel in 1955) set school single-game rebounding records against a major-college opponent.
18 - Warren Isaac (50 points vs. Bates ME in 1964) set Iona's Division I single-game scoring record. . . . Penn's school-record 34-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Temple (57-52 in 1971). . . . Adolph Rupp made his Kentucky head coaching debut in 1930 with a 67-19 decision over Georgetown College KY en route to a school-record 876 victories. . . . Hec Edmundson made his Washington debut in 1920 with a 30-14 decision over Varsity/Alumni en route to becoming the Huskies' all-time winningest coach. . . . Alabama's Harry Hammonds (28 vs. Massachusetts in 1966), Brigham Young's Scott Warner (27 vs. Texas Tech in 1969), Cleveland State's Dave Kyle (24 vs. Ohio University in 1976), Hofstra's John Irving (28 vs. Long Island in 1975) and Northwestern State's Eric Kubel (26 vs. Southeastern Louisiana in 1993) set school single-game rebounding records against a major-college opponent.
19 - Iowa State's Lafester Rhodes (54 points vs. Iowa in overtime in 1987), Norfolk State's Tony Murphy (43 vs. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi at UNLV in 2006) and UNC Asheville's Ricky Chatman (41 vs. James Madison in overtime in 1987) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Kevin Thomas (46 vs. Tennessee in 1955 Carousel Invitational at Charlotte) set Boston University's single-game scoring record against a DI opponent. . . . Oklahoma freshman Trae Young tied NCAA single-game assists record (22 vs. Northwestern State in 2017). . . . Auburn's Rex Frederick (27 vs. SMU in 1957), Lehigh's Greg Falkenbach (25 vs. Drexel in 1970) and New Mexico State's Sam Lacey (27 vs. Hardin-Simmons TX in 1969) set school single-game rebounding records against a major-college opponent.
20 - Fresno State's Charles Bailey (45 points at North Texas State in double overtime in 1973), Georgia's Ronnie Hogue (46 vs. Louisiana State in 1971) and Maryland's Ernest Graham (44 vs. North Carolina State in 1978) set school single-game scoring records. . . . John Connors (23 vs. Iona in 1956) set St. Bonaventure's single-game rebounding record against a major-college opponent.
21 - Idaho's Orlando Lightfoot (50 points at Gonzaga in 1993), Ohio's Dave Jamerson (60 vs. Charleston WV in 1989), Pacific's Bill Stricker (44 vs. Portland in 1968) and Pittsburgh's Don Hennon (45 vs. Duke in double overtime in 1957) set school single-game scoring records. . . . Visiting Cincinnati outlasted Bradley in seven overtimes in 1981 in the longest game in NCAA history. . . . Texas Christian hit an NCAA-record 56 free throws in 70 attempts in 1999 against Eastern Michigan. . . . West Virginia ended North Carolina's school-record 37-game winning streak (75-64 in 1957 at Kentucky), Houston's school-record 59-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Illinois (97-84 in 1968) and Oklahoma State's school-record 49-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Southern California (28-25 in 1940). . . . Memphis State center John Gunn, who averaged 11 points and 9 rebounds per game the previous two years for national postseason tournament teams, died in 1976 due to complications of a rare disease (Stevens-Johnson Syndrome).
22 - Central Michigan's Tommie Johnson (53 points at Wright State in 1987), Georgia Tech's Kenny Anderson (50 vs. Loyola Marymount in 1990), Jackson State's Trey Johnson (49 at Texas-El Paso in 2006) and San Jose State's Adrian Oliver (42 vs. Puget Sound WA in 2010) set school Division I single-game scoring records. . . . Centenary's Robert Parish (50 at Lamar in 1972), Colorado State's Mike Childress (26 vs. San Jose State in 1969) and Seton Hall's Nick Galis (48 vs. Santa Clara in 1978 Cable Car Classic at San Francisco) set school single-game scoring records against a Division I opponent. . . . Louisiana State All-American Pete Maravich set an NCAA single-game record for most successful free throws by converting 30 foul shots at Oregon State in 1969. . . . Oklahoma's school-record 51-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by Duke (90-85 in 1990). . . . Rich Kelley (27 vs. Kentucky in 1973) set Stanford's single-game rebounding record. . . . Oklahoma set an NCAA record for most consecutive points against a DI opponent with a 39-point run in the first half against Weber State in 2014.
23 - Scott Fisher (39 points at Montana State in 1985) set UC Santa Barbara's school single-game scoring record. . . . Bob Portman (46 vs. Weber State in 1968) set Creighton's single-game scoring record against a major-college opponent. . . . Top-ranked Virginia and national player of the year Ralph Sampson lost in Hawaii at tiny NAIA school (Chaminade) in 1982 in perhaps the biggest upset in college basketball history.
27 - Gene Harris (46 points vs. Holy Cross in 1961 Quaker City Classic at Philadelphia) set Penn State's single-game scoring record.
28 - Oklahoma's Wayman Tisdale (61 points vs. Texas-San Antonio in All-College Tournament at Oklahoma City in 1983) and Texas A&M's Bennie Lenox (53 vs. Wyoming in 1963 All-College Tournament at Oklahoma City) set school single-game scoring records. . . . NCAA champion-to-be Michigan lost on a neutral court at Salt Lake City to non-Division I opponent Alaska-Anchorage in 1988. . . . Providence's school-record 55-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by St. John's (91-79 in 1974). . . . Detroit's Bill Ebben (38 vs. Brigham Young in 1955), Gonzaga's Paul Cathey (28 vs. UNLV in 1977), Illinois' Skip Thoren (24 vs. UCLA in 1963), Michigan State's Horace Walker (29 vs. Butler in 1959), Niagara's Alex Ellis (31 vs. Villanova in 1956), UAB's Cameron Moore (24 vs. George Washington in 2011) and Washington State's Jim McKean (27 vs. West Virginia in 1966) set school single-game rebounding records against a major-college opponent.
29 - Chattanooga's Vincent Robinson (20 vs. Tennessee State in 1989), Colorado's Burdette Haldorson (31 vs. Oklahoma in 1952), Louisiana-Monroe's Calvin Natt (31 vs. Georgia Southern in 1976), Ohio State's Frank Howard (32 vs. Brigham Young in 1956), San Diego State's Michael Cage (26 vs. La Salle in 1980), Texas A&M's Steve Niles (21 vs. Furman in 1969) and Utah's Billy McGill (24 vs. UCLA in 1961) set school single-game rebounding records against a major-college opponent.
30 - Austin Peay's James "Fly" Williams (51 points vs. Georgia Southern in final of 1972 Claxton Fruitcake Classic), Florida International's Carlos Arroyo (39 at North Texas in overtime in 2000), Fordham's Charlie Yelverton (46 vs. Rochester NY in 1970), Hawaii's Trevor Ruffin (42 vs. Louisville in 1993), Penn's Ernie Beck (47 vs. Duke in 1952 Dixie Classic at Raleigh, N.C.), St. Joseph's Tony Costner (47 vs. Alaska-Anchorage in 1983 Cable Car Classic at San Francisco) and Utah State's Wayne Estes (52 vs. Boston College in overtime at 1964 Rainbow Classic in Hawaii) set school single-game scoring records. . . . Duke overcame a 29-point halftime deficit to defeat Tulane in consolation game of 1950 Dixie Classic at Raleigh. . . . Stanford ended Long Island's school-record 43-game winning streak (45-31 in 1936). . . . Hawaii's Bob Nash (30 vs. Arizona State in 1971), Idaho State's Ed Wilson (26 vs. Arkansas in 1967), La Salle's Tom Gola (31 vs. Brigham Young in 1953), Michigan State's Johnny Green (29 vs. Washington in 1957), St. John's LeRoy Ellis Sr. (30 vs. NYU in 1961), South Alabama's Leon Williams (28 vs. Texas-Arlington in 1972) and Western Kentucky's Tom Marshall (29 vs. Louisville in 1953) set school single-game rebounding records against a major-college opponent.
31 - Loyola of Chicago's school-record 41-game homecourt winning streak was snapped by St. Louis (90-57 in 1964).

Memorable Moments in November College Basketball History

On This NFL Date: Former College Hoopers Ready For December Football

Long before kneeling knuckleheads such as GQ poster boy #ColonKrapernick, the NCAA Tournament commenced in 1939, which was one year after the NIT triggered national postseason competition. An overlooked "versatile athlete" feat occurring in 1938 likely never to be duplicated took place at Arkansas, where the quarterback for the football squad (Jack Robbins) repeated as an All-SWC first-team basketball selection, leading the Razorbacks (19-3) to the league title. After the season, Robbins became an NFL first-round draft choice by the Chicago Cardinals (5th pick overall) and senior football/basketball teammates Jim Benton (11th pick by Cleveland Rams) and Ray Hamilton (41st pick by Rams) went on to become wide receivers for at least six years in the NFL. Yes, they created a kneeling-in-admiration shatterproof achievement - three members of a league championship basketball squad who promptly were among the top 41 selections in same NFL draft.

Two years later, All-SWC first-team hoop selection Howard "Red" Hickey was instrumental in Arkansas reaching the 1941 Final Four before becoming an end for the Cleveland Rams' 1945 NFL titlist. Two-sport college teammate and fellow end O'Neal Adams scored five touchdowns for the New York Giants the first half of the 1940s. Another two-sport Hog who played for the Giants in the mid-1940s was Harry Wynne. An earlier versatile Razorback was Jim Lee Howell, who was an All-SWC first five hoop selection in 1935-36 before becoming a starting end for the Giants' 1938 NFL titlist and Pro Bowl participant the next year. Adams, Benton, Hamilton, Hickey and Howell combined for 77 touchdowns in an 11-year span from 1938 through 1948 when at least one of the ex-Razorback hoopers scored a TD in each of those seasons.

Hickey and ex-Hog All-SWC second-team hooper in 1929-30/NFL end Milan Creighton each coached NFL franchises. Many other ex-college hoopers also displayed their wares on the gridiron. Following is exhaustive research you can tackle regarding former college basketball players who made a name for themselves in December football at the professional level:

DECEMBER
1: B Len Barnum (West Virginia Wesleyan hooper) accounted for the New York Giants' lone score with a 17-yard touchdown pass to Jim Lee Howell (All-SWC first-five hoops selection as Arkansas senior in 1935-36) in 14-6 setback against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1940. . . . Los Angeles Rams E Jim Benton (forward was Arkansas' third-leading scorer in SWC play as senior in 1937-38) caught two touchdown passes from Bob Waterfield in a 31-21 win against the New York Giants in 1946. . . . Cleveland Browns FB Jim Brown (#2-scorer with 14 ppg for Syracuse as sophomore in 1954-55 before averaging 11.3 as junior) rushed for 179 yards on 29 carries in a 24-10 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1963. . . . B Olie Cordill (Rice hoops letterman in 1938) caught a third-quarter touchdown pass to help the Cleveland Rams secure 13-13 tie against the Green Bay Packers in 1940. . . . Green Bay Packers FB Ted Fritsch Sr. (Wisconsin-Stevens Point hoops letterman in 1940-41 and 1941-42) had three of his league-high nine rushing touchdowns in a 20-7 win against the Washington Redskins in 1946. . . . Los Angeles Dons rookie E Dale Gentry (averaged 5.3 ppg for Washington State's 1941 NCAA Tournament runner-up) caught two touchdown passes in a 62-14 win against the Buffalo Bisons in 1946. . . . Dallas Cowboys CB Cornell Green (Utah State's all-time leading scorer and rebounder when career ended in 1961-62) had two interceptions in a 34-27 setback against the New York Giants in 1963. . . . TE Todd Heap (grabbed 14 rebounds in 11 games for Arizona State in 1999-00) caught a touchdown pass midway through the fourth quarter to give the Baltimore Ravens the lead in a 27-23 win against the Cincinnati Bengals in 2002. . . . Minnesota Vikings QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) threw four touchdown passes in a 41-17 win against the Arizona Cardinals in 1996. . . . Chicago Cardinals rookie E Mal Kutner (two-year Texas hoops letterman in early 1940s) caught two touchdown passes from Paul Christman in a 35-28 win against the Chicago Bears in 1946. . . . Los Angeles Rams TE James McDonald (four-year Southern California letterman in early 1980s averaged 8.2 ppg and 4.8 rpg as senior forward) had a 35-yard pass reception in 29-3 setback against the New Orleans Saints in 1985. . . . Brooklyn Dodgers TB Ace Parker (Duke hoops letterman in 1936) threw two touchdown passes in a 14-6 win against the New York Giants in 1940. One of the TD receptions was caught by rookie HB Banks McFadden (led Clemson in scoring each of his three seasons en route to becoming school's first All-American in 1939). . . . Chicago Bears K Mac Percival (three-year hoops letterman was part of squad winning Texas Tech's first SWC championship in major sport in 1960-61) kicked three of his league-high 25 field goals in a 23-17 win against the New Orleans Saints in 1968. . . . New York Giants B Kink Richards (Simpson IA hoops letterman) had a decisive 31-yard rushing touchdown in the fourth quarter of 21-14 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1935. . . . Atlanta Falcons WR Andre Rison (backup hoops guard for Michigan State in 1987-88) had eight pass receptions for 124 yards - including two fourth-quarter touchdowns - in a 35-31 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1991. . . . Washington Redskins QB Norm Snead (averaged 7.8 ppg in four Wake Forest games as senior in 1960-61) passed for 332 yards in a 36-20 setback against the Baltimore Colts in 1963. . . . Cincinnati Bengals QB John Stofa (averaged 5.8 ppg and 5.4 rpg for Buffalo in 1961-62) threw two second-half touchdown passes in a 33-14 setback against the Boston Patriots in 1968. . . . San Diego Chargers WR Kitrick Taylor (Washington State hooper in 1984-85 and 1986-87) had six pass receptions for 60 yards in a 9-7 setback against the Oakland Raiders in 1991.

2: Washington Redskins B Steve Bagarus (Notre Dame hooper in early 1940s) caught two touchdown passes (70 and 29 yards) from QB Sammy Baugh (TCU three-year hoops letterman was All-SWC honorable mention selection as senior in 1936-37) in a 24-0 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1945. Baugh finished with three TD passes. . . . Philadelphia Eagles WR Harold Carmichael (starter two seasons for Southern LA averaged 9.8 ppg and 10.6 rpg in 1969-70) caught two second-quarter touchdown passes from Ron Jaworski in a 44-7 win against the Detroit Lions in 1979. . . . Dallas Cowboys TE Jean Fugett (leading scorer and rebounder for Amherst MA as junior in 1970-71) caught two touchdown passes in a 22-10 win against the Denver Broncos in 1973. . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught 10 passes for 140 yards in a 24-10 setback against the San Diego Chargers in 2007. . . . Cleveland Browns QB Otto Graham (Big Ten Conference runner-up in scoring as Northwestern sophomore in 1941-42 and junior in 1942-43) threw four first-half touchdown passes in a 49-28 win against the Chicago Cardinals in 1951. . . . New York Giants TB Hinkey Haines (Lebanon Valley PA transfer earned hoops letter for Penn State in 1920 and 1921) rushed for two fourth-quarter touchdowns in a 19-13 setback against the New York Yankees in 1928. . . . Los Angeles Rams E Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch (starting center for Michigan in 1944) had a 91-yard touchdown reception from Bob Waterfield in 42-17 win against the Chicago Bears in 1951. . . . Detroit Lions QB Bobby Layne (Texas hooper in 1944-45) threw two second-half touchdown passes in a 42-10 win against the Chicago Bears in 1956. . . . Chicago Bears QB Johnny Lujack (averaged 3.4 ppg as starting guard for Notre Dame in 1943-44) rushed for two first-quarter touchdowns in a 42-17 setback against the Los Angeles Rams in 1951. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers E Elbie Nickel (Cincinnati's second-leading scorer in 1942 also earned hoops letter in 1947) caught two touchdown passes in a 30-13 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1956. . . . Buffalo Bills TE Tom Rychlec (collected four points and six rebounds in one hoops game for American International MA in 1954-55) opened the game's scoring with a touchdown reception from Jack Kemp in 23-14 win against the Dallas Texans in 1962. . . . New York Giants DB Otto Schnellbacher (averaged 11 ppg in four-year Kansas career, earning All-Big Six/Seven Conference honors each season) returned an interception 46 yards for touchdown in 14-0 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1951. . . . Washington Redskins QB Norm Snead (averaged 7.8 ppg in four Wake Forest games as senior in 1960-61) threw two first-half touchdown passes in a 37-14 setback against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1962. . . . Dallas Cowboys QB Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) threw three touchdown passes in a 28-7 win against the New York Giants in 1979. . . . San Francisco 49ers E Billy Wilson (averaged 3.3 ppg as senior letterman for San Jose State in 1950-51) caught two touchdown passes from Y.A. Tittle (one for 77 yards) in a 20-17 win against the Baltimore Colts in 1956. . . . Boston Redskins B Doug Wycoff (Georgia Tech hoops letterman in 1926) opened the game's scoring with a 45-yard touchdown pass to Cliff Battles (four seasons of varsity hoops for West Virginia Wesleyan) in 13-3 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1934.

3: Kansas City Chiefs LB Bobby Bell (first African-American hooper for Minnesota in 1960-61) returned an interception 61 yards for touchdown in 24-21 win against the Denver Broncos in 1972. . . . Philadelphia Eagles WR Harold Carmichael (starter two seasons for Southern LA averaged 9.8 ppg and 10.6 rpg in 1969-70) caught two first-half touchdown passes (56 and 21 yards) from Ron Jaworski in a 28-27 setback against the Minnesota Vikings in 1978. . . . Miami Dolphins WR Chris Chambers (played hoops briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) caught eight passes for 121 yards in a 24-10 setback against the Jacksonville Jaguars in 2006. . . . Los Angeles Rams rookie RB Glenn Davis (Army hooper in 1944-45 and 1945-46) scored two second-quarter touchdowns (one rushing/one receiving) in a 51-14 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1950. . . . Miami Dolphins DE Vern Den Herder (finished Central College IA career in 1970-71 as school's all-time leading scorer and rebounder) returned an interception 24 yards in 37-21 win against the New England Patriots in 1972. . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught nine passes - including two touchdowns - in a 31-28 setback against the Cleveland Browns in 2006. . . . Washington Redskins DB Dale Hackbart (averaged 4 ppg and 3.5 rpg in 10 contests for Wisconsin in 1958-59) had two interceptions in a 38-24 setback against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1961. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB King Hill (Rice hoops letterman in 1955-56 and 1956-57) punted nine times for 432 yards (48.0 average) in a 35-24 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1961. . . . Minnesota Vikings QB Joe Kapp (backup forward averaged 1.8 ppg and 1.2 rpg for California's PCC champions in 1957 and 1958) threw two second-half touchdown passes in a 30-27 setback against the Green Bay Packers in 1967. . . . Detroit Lions QB Bobby Layne (Texas hooper in 1944-45) threw three touchdown passes (82, 67 and 32 yards) in a 45-21 win against the Baltimore Colts in 1950. Lions E Cloyce Box (combined with twin brother Boyce to help West Texas win Border Conference hoop championship in 1943) had four touchdowns among his 12 pass receptions for 302 yards. In 1961 with the Pittsburgh Steelers, Layne threw three TD passes in a 35-24 setback against the Philadelphia Eagles. . . . Cleveland Rams rookie B Bill Lazetich (three-year Montana hoops letterman in late 1930s) opened the game's scoring with a five-yard touchdown catch in 35-13 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1939. . . . Cleveland Browns WR Dave Logan (three-time scoring runner-up averaged 14.1 ppg and 6.3 rpg for Colorado in mid-1970s) caught two touchdown passes from Brian Sipe in a 47-24 setback against the Seattle Seahawks in 1978. . . . Philadelphia Eagles B Fran Murray (All-EIL first-team guard for Penn in 1935-36 and 1936-37) caught a 45-yard touchdown pass from Dave O'Brien in 35-13 setback against the Cleveland Rams in 1939. . . . Oakland Raiders WR Art Powell (averaged 10.5 ppg and 8.2 rpg for San Jose State in 1956-57) caught two touchdown passes from Tom Flores (32 and 31 yards) in a 28-28 tie against the New York Jets in 1966. . . . Minnesota Vikings WR Jerry Reichow (Iowa hooper in 1954-55) caught two touchdown passes from Fran Tarkenton - including one of them for 51 yards - in a 42-21 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1961. . . . Chicago Bears QB Gene Ronzani (among Marquette's top four scorers in 1931-32 and 1932-33) threw three touchdown passes in a 49-7 win against the Chicago Cardinals in 1944. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Norm Snead (averaged 7.8 ppg in four Wake Forest games as senior in 1960-61) threw four touchdown passes in a 35-35 tie against the Washington Redskins in 1967. Six years earlier with the Washington Redskins, Snead threw a 60-yard TD pass to WR Tom Osborne (scored 1,291 points for Hastings NE during last half of 1950s) in a 38-24 setback against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1961. . . . Dallas Cowboys QB Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) threw two second-half touchdown passes in a 17-10 win against the New England Patriots in 1978. . . . Rookie WR Dave Stief (hoop teammate of Portland State All-American Freeman Williams in 1977-78) caught 53-yard touchdown pass from Jim Hart in the fourth quarter to give the St. Louis Cardinals a 21-14 win against the Detroit Lions in 1978. . . . Miami Dolphins DE Jason Taylor (averaged 8 ppg and 5.4 rpg for Akron in 1994-95) had three sacks in a 33-6 win against the Buffalo Bills in 2000. . . . Detroit Lions rookie HB Doak Walker (SMU hoops letterman as freshman in 1945-46) rushed for two touchdowns in a 45-21 win against the Baltimore Colts in 1950.

4: Chicago Bears TE Martellus Bennett (averaged 1.9 ppg and 1.5 rpg as Texas A&M freshman in 2005-06 before playing briefly next season under coach Billy Gillispie) had a career-high 12 pass receptions in 41-28 setback against the Dallas Cowboys in 2014. . . . Cleveland Browns FB Jim Brown (#2-scorer with 14 ppg for Syracuse as sophomore in 1954-55 before averaging 11.3 as junior) rushed for 135 yards on 15 carries and caught two passes for 64 yards in a 27-16 win against the Washington Redskins in 1960. . . . Miami Dolphins WR Chris Chambers (played hoops briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) caught 15 passes for 238 yards in a 24-23 win against the Buffalo Bills in 2005. . . . Portsmouth Spartans TB Dutch Clark (four-time All-Rocky Mountain Conference hoops choice for Colorado College) rushed for two touchdowns in a 19-0 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1932. . . . Chicago Bears LB George Connor (Holy Cross hoops letterman in 1943 and 1944 before averaging 2.5 ppg as Notre Dame center in 1946-47) recovered a fumble and returned it 48 yards for touchdown in 21-20 win against the Detroit Lions in 1955. . . . Buffalo Bills LB London Fletcher (started two games for St. Francis PA as freshman in 1993-94 before transferring to John Carroll OH) had two sacks in a 24-23 setback against the Miami Dolphins in 2005. . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught 11 passes for 147 yards in a 30-24 setback against the New England Patriots in 2000. . . . Cleveland Browns QB Otto Graham (Big Ten Conference runner-up in scoring as Northwestern sophomore in 1941-42 and junior in 1942-43) threw two touchdown passes (51 and 49 yards) in a 31-21 playoff win against the Buffalo Bills in 1949. . . . New York Giants TB Hinkey Haines (Lebanon Valley PA transfer earned hoops letter for Penn State in 1920 and 1921) returned a kickoff 75 yards for touchdown in 14-0 win against the New York Yankees in 1927. . . . Oakland Raiders rookie WR Charlie Hardy (played in nine hoops games for San Jose State in 1954-55) caught four passes for 123 yards in a 41-17 setback against the Los Angeles Chargers in 1960. It was the first of three consecutive contests during the month where Hardy had a touchdown reception. . . . Green Bay Packers RB Paul Hornung (averaged 6.1 ppg in 10 contests for Notre Dame in 1954-55) scored two second-half touchdowns in a 41-13 win against the Chicago Bears in 1960. . . . San Diego Chargers WR Vincent Jackson (Northern Colorado's scoring leader with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg) caught five passes for 148 yards in a 34-7 win against the Oakland Raiders in 2008. . . . Chicago Bears E Luke Johnsos (Northwestern hoops letterman in 1927 and 1928) accounted for the game's only score with a 29-yard touchdown pass from Keith Molesworth (three-year hoops letterman for Monmouth IL in late 1920s) in a 6-0 win against the New York Giants in 1932. . . . Atlanta Falcons CB Rolland Lawrence (captain of Tabor KS hoops squad as senior in 1972-73) had an interception and returned punt 23 yards in 16-10 setback against the New England Patriots in 1977. . . . New York Bulldogs QB Bobby Layne (Texas hooper in 1944-45) threw three touchdown passes in a 28-27 setback against the Detroit Lions in 1949. . . . New York Giants DE George Martin (Oregon hoops teammate of freshman sensation Ron Lee in 1972-73) had three sacks in a 44-7 win against the Phoenix Cardinals in 1988. . . . Buffalo Bills HB Chet Mutryn (Xavier hoops letterman in 1943) caught two touchdown passes from George Ratterman (third-leading scorer with 11.7 ppg for Notre Dame in 1944-45) in a 31-21 setback against the Cleveland Browns in 1949 AAFC playoff game. Ratterman finished with three TD passes. . . . Washington Redskins rookie WR Tom Osborne (scored 1,291 points for Hastings NE during last half of 1950s) had a career-high six pass receptions in 27-16 setback against the Cleveland Browns in 1960. . . . New York Yankees E Barney Poole (Ole Miss hoops letterman in 1943) had a 15-yard pass reception in 17-7 playoff setback against the San Francisco 49ers in 1949. Yankees DB Otto Schnellbacher (averaged 11 ppg in four-year Kansas career, earning All-Big Six/Seven Conference honors each season) returned three punts for 34 yards. . . . New York Titans WR Art Powell (averaged 10.5 ppg and 8.2 rpg for San Jose State in 1956-57) had three touchdown catches in a 30-27 win against the Denver Broncos in 1960. Broncos S Al Romine (four-year hoops letterman from 1951-52 through 1954-55 for Florence State AL) returned an interception 13 yards and SE Lionel Taylor (led New Mexico Highlands in scoring average with 13.6 ppg in 1955-56 and 20.3 in 1956-57) had 11 pass receptions - including two second-half TDs from Frank Tripucka. . . . Dallas Cowboys QB Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) threw three touchdown passes in a 52-10 win against the New York Jets in 1971. . . . In 1960, New York Giants HB Ed Sutton (seven hoop games for North Carolina as sophomore in 1954-55) rushed for 62 yards on seven carries in a 31-31 tie against the Dallas Cowboys after rushing for 57 yards on five carries in 31-23 setback against the Philadelphia Eagles the previous week.

5: Washington Redskins RB Cliff Battles (four seasons of varsity hoops for West Virginia Wesleyan) rushed for two first-quarter touchdowns in a 49-14 win against the New York Giants in 1937. Giants TB Ed Danowski (Fordham hoops letterman in 1932-33) threw two touchdown passes. . . . Philadelphia Eagles E Tony Bova (St. Francis PA hoops letterman in 1942) caught two touchdown passes (48 and 13 yards en route to leading league with 24.6-yd average) in a 38-28 setback against the Green Bay Packers in 1943. . . . In 1937, Chicago Bears QB Ray Buivid (Marquette hoops letterman in 1935-36) became the first rookie to throw five touchdown passes in a single NFL game (42-28 nod over Chicago Cardinals). . . . Oakland Raiders WR Ronald Curry (averaged 4.2 ppg, 2.5 rpg and 3 apg for North Carolina in 1998-99 and 2000-01) caught nine passes for 141 yards - including two touchdowns from Kerry Collins - in a 34-27 setback against the Kansas City Chiefs in 2004. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers TB Ray Evans (two-time All-American was four-year letterman and second-leading scorer for Kansas in 1942 NCAA Tournament) opened the game's scoring with a nine-yard rushing touchdown in 38-28 win against the New York Giants in 1948. . . . Los Angeles Dons rookie WR Len Ford (center for Morgan State's CIAA hoops titlist in 1944) caught two touchdown passes from Glenn Dobbs in a 38-21 setback against the San Francisco 49ers in 1948. . . . New York Giants' Dave Jennings (forward averaged 5.9 ppg for St. Lawrence NY in 1972-73 and 1973-74) punted four times for 55.3-yard average in 17-14 win against the Houston Oilers in 1982. Giants DE George Martin (Oregon hoops teammate of freshman sensation Ron Lee in 1972-73) had three sacks. . . . Washington Redskins QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) threw three touchdown passes in a 37-16 win against the New York Jets in 1976. . . . Chicago Cardinals E Mal Kutner (two-year Texas hoops letterman in early 1940s) had two of his league-high 14 pass reception touchdowns in a 42-7 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1948. . . . Philadelphia Eagles rookie QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw two second-quarter touchdown passes in a 21-17 setback against the Arizona Cardinals in 1999. Five years later, McNabb completed 32-of-43 passes - including five TDs - in a 47-17 win against the Green Bay Packers in 2004. WR Terrell Owens (UTC hooper from 1993-94 through 1995-96 started five games) had eight of McNabb's 32 pass completions for 161 yards. Five years earlier with the San Francisco 49ers, Owens caught nine passes for 145 yards in a 44-30 setback against the Cincinnati Bengals in 1999. . . . Philadelphia Eagles B Dom Moselle (leading hoops scorer for Wisconsin-Superior in 1947-48 and 1948-49) had a career-high 46 rushing yards in 13-13 tie against the Detroit Lions in 1954. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Norm Snead (averaged 7.8 ppg in four Wake Forest games as senior in 1960-61) passed for 320 yards in a 21-19 setback against the Dallas Cowboys in 1965. . . . Denver Broncos SE Lionel Taylor (led New Mexico Highlands in scoring average with 13.6 ppg in 1955-56 and 20.3 in 1956-57) had eight pass receptions for 164 yards in a 24-13 setback against the Oakland Raiders in 1965. . . . New York Giants LB Brad Van Pelt (averaged 4.5 ppg and 2.9 rpg while shooting 61.7% from floor as Michigan State sophomore in 1970-71) had two interceptions in a 24-10 win against the Detroit Lions in 1976. . . . Cincinnati Bengals DE Alfred Williams (Colorado hooper in 1989-90) supplied a safety by tackling Steve Young in the end zone in 21-8 setback against the San Francisco 49ers in 1993.

6: San Francisco 49ers RB Joe Arenas (averaged 6.2 ppg in 1949-50 and 1950-51 for Nebraska-Omaha) rushed for two touchdowns against the Green Bay Packers to finish the 1953 campaign with seven TDs. . . . Boston Braves RB Cliff Battles (four seasons of varsity hoops for West Virginia Wesleyan) scored a touchdown on 74-yard punt return in 14-0 win against the New York Giants in 1936. . . . Cleveland Browns E Pete Brewster (forward-center was Purdue's fourth-leading scorer as junior and senior) caught three first-half touchdown passes (22, 23 and 36 yards) in a 62-14 win against the New York Giants in 1953. Browns QB George Ratterman (third-leading scorer with 11.7 ppg for Notre Dame in 1944-45) threw three TD passes. . . . FB Rick Casares (Florida's scoring and rebounding leader both seasons as All-SEC second-team selection in 1951-52 and 1952-53) rushed for all four of the Chicago Bears' touchdowns in a 27-21 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1959. . . . Indianapolis Colts DE Sam Clancy (two-time Eastern 8 first-team selection ended career in 1981 as Pittsburgh's all-time leading rebounder) had 2 1/2 sacks in a 6-0 win against the New England Patriots in 1992. . . . San Diego Chargers TE Antonio Gates (second-team All-MAC selection in 2002 when Kent State finished runner-up in South Regional) caught eight passes for 167 yards in a 30-23 win against the Cleveland Browns in 2009. . . . Green Bay Packers RB Paul Hornung (averaged 6.1 ppg in 10 contests for Notre Dame in 1954-55) threw two first-half touchdown passes to Boyd Dowler (26 and 30 yards) in a 38-20 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1959. . . . St. Louis Cardinals QB Charley Johnson (transferred from Schreiner J.C. to New Mexico State to play hoops before concentrating on football) threw two second-quarter touchdown passes and contributed a pair of one-yard plunges for TDs in a 28-19 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1964. . . . San Francisco 49ers DB Ronnie Lott (USC hooper as junior in 1979-80) had two interceptions in a 23-12 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1987. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers QB Bill Mackrides (Nevada-Reno hoops letterman in 1944) passed for one fourth-quarter touchdown to Elbie Nickel (Cincinnati's second-leading scorer in 1942 also earned hoops letter in 1947) and rushed for another TD in a 21-17 win against the Chicago Cardinals in 1953. . . . Cleveland Browns WR Evan Moore (Stanford hooper in 2003-04 and 2004-05) had a career-high six pass receptions in his pro debut, a 30-23 setback against the San Diego Chargers in 2009. . . . A fourth-quarter touchdown catch by WR Art Powell (averaged 10.5 ppg and 8.2 rpg for San Jose State in 1956-57) gave the Oakland Raiders a 16-13 win against the Buffalo Bills in 1964. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers rookie WR Dave Smith (averaged 15.6 ppg and 11.6 rpg while shooting 51.1% from floor for Indiana PA in 1968-69 and 1969-70) caught an 87-yard touchdown pass from Terry Bradshaw in 20-12 setback against the Green Bay Packers in 1970. . . . Denver Broncos WR Rod Smith (swingman was Missouri Southern State hoops letterman as sophomore in 1990-91) caught eight passes for 165 yards in a 35-31 win against the Kansas City Chiefs in 1998. . . . Kansas City Chiefs WR Otis Taylor (backup small forward for Prairie View A&M) scored two touchdowns (46-yard pass reception and 25-yard rush) in a 26-17 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 1971. . . . Providence Steam Roller rookie TB Cy Wentworth (New Hampshire hoops letterman in 1922 and 1923) opened the game's scoring with a 20-yard rushing touchdown in 13-10 setback against the Green Bay Packers in 1925.

7: St. Louis Cardinals DE Bubba Baker (averaged 4.1 ppg and 3.5 rpg as forward-center for Colorado State from 1974-75 through 1977-78) posted 2 1/2 sacks against the Philadelphia Eagles in a 10-10 tie in 1986. . . . Washington Redskins QB Sammy Baugh (TCU three-year hoops letterman was All-SWC honorable mention selection as senior in 1936-37) threw three touchdown passes in a 20-14 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1941. . . . Detroit Lions WR Marlin Briscoe (averaged 9.5 ppg and 3.6 rpg for Nebraska-Omaha in 1964-65) caught two second-half touchdown passes in a 25-21 setback against the Chicago Bears in 1975. Briscoe finished the game with five catches for 119 yards. . . . New York Giants rookie E Ed Crawford (Ole Miss hoops letterman averaged 2.8 ppg and 5.3 rpg in eight games in 1954-55) had a 27-yard pass reception in 21-10 setback against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1957. . . . Washington Redskins LB London Fletcher (started two games for St. Francis PA as freshman in 1993-94 before transferring to John Carroll OH) had at least 10 tackles for the second consecutive contest in 2008. . . . Cleveland Browns QB Otto Graham (Big Ten Conference runner-up in scoring as Northwestern sophomore in 1941-42 and junior in 1942-43) threw three touchdown passes in a 42-0 win against the Baltimore Colts in 1947. . . . Philadelphia Eagles E Bud Grant (third-leading scorer for Minnesota in 1948-49 after named team MVP previous season over first-team All-American Jim McIntyre) caught two touchdown passes in a 38-21 win against the Dallas Texans in 1952. . . . Dallas Cowboys SS Cornell Green (Utah State's all-time leading scorer and rebounder when career ended in 1961-62) had two interceptions in a 41-17 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1974. . . . E Red Hickey (three-time All-SWC selection and member of Arkansas' 1941 Final Four team) caught a 20-yard touchdown pass from Bob Waterfield in the fourth quarter to give the Los Angeles Rams a 17-14 win against the Chicago Bears in 1947. . . . Tampa Bay Buccaneers WR Vincent Jackson (Northern Colorado's scoring leader with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg) caught 10 passes for 159 yards in a 34-17 setback against the Detroit Lions in 2014. . . . Chicago Cardinals FB Bert Johnson (played one game in 1934-35 under legendary Kentucky coach Adolph Rupp) had a 26-yard touchdown reception in 34-24 setback against the Chicago Bears in 1941. . . . Tampa Bay Buccaneers QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) threw two second-quarter touchdown passes in a 14-7 win against the New Orleans Saints in 2003. . . . Chicago Bears E Luke Johnsos (Northwestern hoops letterman in 1927 and 1928) caught two touchdown passes from Red Grange (21 and 30 yards) in a 21-0 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1930. . . . Washington Redskins QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) passed for 320 yards and three touchdowns in a 30-27 win against the Atlanta Falcons in 1975. . . . Chicago Cardinals E-DB Mal Kutner (two-year Texas hoops letterman in early 1940s) scored two fourth-quarter touchdowns - including 56-yard interception return - in a 45-21 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1947. . . . Washington Redskins DB Joe Lavender (averaged 13.4 ppg and 6.6 rpg for San Diego State in 1969-70 and 1970-71) had three interceptions - returning one 51 yards for touchdown - in a 40-17 win against the San Diego Chargers in 1980. . . . Detroit Lions QB Bobby Layne (Texas hooper in 1944-45) threw four touchdown passes in a 45-21 win against the Chicago Bears in 1952. Three of league-high 15 TD receptions for Lions E Cloyce Box (combined with twin brother Boyce to help West Texas win Border Conference hoop championship in 1943) each was at least 25 yards in the first half. Six years later with the Pittsburgh Steelers, Layne threw two second-half TD passes - including a 28-yarder to E Cy McClairen (two-time all-league selection scored 36 points for Bethune-Cookman in 1953 SIAC Tournament championship game) - in a 14-14 tie against the Washington Redskins in 1958. . . . Cleveland Rams HB Bill Lund (hooper for Case Western Reserve OH) scored two second-half touchdowns - including a 63-yard run from scrimmage - in a 42-0 win against the Baltimore Colts in 1947. . . . New York Giants WR Bob McChesney (Hardin-Simmons TX hoops letterman in 1945-46) caught a career-long 72-yard touchdown pass from Kyle Rote in 27-17 setback against the Washington Redskins in 1952. Redskins E Hugh Taylor (OCU leading scorer with 11.4 ppg as senior in 1947) caught three touchdown passes from Eddie LeBaron. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw three touchdown passes in a 36-10 win against the Dallas Cowboys in 2003. . . . Houston Oilers CB Zeke Moore (Lincoln MO hoops letterman in mid-1960s) returned an interception 74 yards in a 27-13 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 1975. It was Moore's first of three INTs in as many games to close the season. . . . San Francisco 49ers WR Terrell Owens (UTC hooper from 1993-94 through 1995-96 started five games) caught two first-half touchdown passes from Jeff Garcia in a 50-14 win against the Arizona Cardinals in 2003. . . . Dallas Cowboys RB Preston Pearson (swingman averaged 8.7 ppg and 6 rpg as Illinois senior in 1966-67) had eight pass receptions in a 31-17 setback against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1975. . . . Cleveland Browns RB Greg Pruitt (Oklahoma frosh hooper in 1969-70) had 10 pass receptions - including go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter - in a 17-14 win against the New York Jets in 1980. . . . Chicago Rockets B Ray Ramsey (Bradley's top scorer in 1941-42 and 1942-43) had an 80-yard touchdown reception in 34-14 setback against the Los Angeles Dons in 1947. . . . Buffalo Bills rookie QB George Ratterman (third-leading scorer with 11.7 ppg for Notre Dame in 1944-45) threw three touchdown passes in a 21-21 tie against the San Francisco 49ers in 1947. . . . Denver Broncos WR Rod Smith (swingman was Missouri Southern State hoops letterman as sophomore in 1990-91) caught two first-half touchdown passes from John Elway (37 and 25 yards) in a 35-24 setback against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1997. . . . Dallas Cowboys QB Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) threw three touchdown passes in a 41-17 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1974. . . . San Francisco 49ers E Billy Wilson (averaged 3.3 ppg as senior letterman for San Jose State in 1950-51) caught two first-quarter touchdown passes from Y.A. Tittle (44 and 22 yards) in a 48-21 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1958.

8: Cleveland Browns DB Erich Barnes (played hoops briefly for Purdue as sophomore in 1955-56) returned an interception 40 yards for touchdown in 24-21 win against the Washington Redskins in 1968. . . . Kansas City Chiefs LB Bobby Bell (first African-American hooper for Minnesota in 1960-61) had two interceptions in a 40-3 win against the San Diego Chargers in 1968. . . . Cleveland Browns TE Jordan Cameron (redshirt freshman forward for BYU in 2006-07 before playing briefly for Southern California in 2008-09 under coach Tim Floyd) had nine pass receptions for 121 yards in a 27-26 setback against the New England Patriots in 2013. . . . Kansas City Chiefs QB Len Dawson (Purdue hooper in 1956-57) threw three first-half touchdown passes - including a 68-yarder to Frank Pitts - in a 40-3 win against the San Diego Chargers in 1968. . . . New Orleans Saints TE Jimmy Graham (part-time starter for Miami FL averaged 4.2 ppg and 4.2 rpg from 2005-06 through 2008-09) caught two of his NFL-high 16 touchdown passes from Drew Brees in a 31-13 win against the Carolina Panthers in 2013. . . . Denver Broncos DB Charlie Greer (played seven basketball games for Colorado in 1965-66 as sophomore) had two interceptions in a 33-27 setback against the Oakland Raiders in 1968. . . . Miami Dolphins QB Bob Griese (sophomore guard for Purdue in 1964-65) threw two second-quarter touchdown passes in a 38-7 win against the Boston Patriots in 1968. . . . Los Angeles Rams E Red Hickey (three-time All-SWC selection and member of Arkansas' 1941 Final Four team) caught two second-half touchdown passes from Bob Waterfield in a 38-17 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1946. . . . Los Angeles Rams E Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch (starting center for Michigan hoops in 1944) had two touchdown catches in a 42-17 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1957. . . . Minnesota Vikings QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) threw three touchdown passes in a 24-22 win against the Detroit Lions in 1996. Six years later with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Johnson threw four TD passes in a 34-10 win against the Atlanta Falcons in 2002. . . . St. Louis Cardinals QB Charley Johnson (transferred from Schreiner J.C. to New Mexico State to play hoops before concentrating on football) passed for 315 yards - including four touchdowns (three for more than 40 yards) - in a 38-14 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1963. . . . Phoenix Cardinals RB Johnny Johnson (averaged 11.2 ppg, 6.5 rpg and 3.2 apg in 1988-89 after majority of hoop team members walked off San Jose State squad) rushed for two second-quarter touchdowns in a 20-14 setback against the Washington Redskins in 1991. . . . Baltimore Ravens WR Jacoby Jones (part-time starter averaged 3.4 ppg and 3.7 rpg for Lane TN in 2004-05 and 2005-06) returned a kickoff 77 yards for touchdown in 29-26 win against the Minnesota Vikings in 2013. . . . Minnesota Vikings QB Joe Kapp (backup forward averaged 1.8 ppg and 1.2 rpg for California's PCC champions in 1957 and 1958) rushed for two touchdowns in a 30-20 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 1968. . . . Frankford Yellow Jackets E Chuck Kassel (Illinois hoops letterman in 1925 and 1926) contributed the game's lone touchdown with a 10-yard pass reception in 7-0 win against the New York Giants in 1928. . . . Cleveland Rams rookie HB Bill Lund (hooper for Case Western Reserve OH) opened the game's scoring with a 22-yard touchdown reception in 66-14 win against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1946. . . . Baltimore Colts rookie TE John Mackey (Syracuse hooper in 1960-61) caught two touchdown passes from Johnny Unitas (61 and 27 yards) in a 41-10 win against the Minnesota Vikings in 1963. . . . Rookie E Eggs Manske (point guard led Northwestern to share of 1933 Big Ten Conference crown) supplied the Philadelphia Eagles' only score with a pass reception touchdown in 13-6 setback against the Green Bay Packers in 1935. . . . Buffalo Bills TE Keith McKeller (starting center for Jacksonville State's 1985 NCAA Division II championship team led Gulf South Conference in rebounding each of his first three seasons and finished second as senior) had 10 pass receptions in a 30-27 win against the Oakland Raiders in 1991. . . . B Keith Molesworth (three-year hoops letterman for Monmouth IL in late 1920s) rushed for both of the game's touchdowns to power the Chicago Bears to a 13-0 win against the Chicago Cardinals in 1935. . . . San Francisco 49ers WR Terrell Owens (UTC hooper from 1993-94 through 1995-96 started five games) had 12 pass receptions - including two fourth-quarter touchdowns from Jeff Garcia (including game winner with 12 seconds remaining) in a 31-27 win against the Dallas Cowboys in 2002. . . . Oakland Raiders WR Art Powell (averaged 10.5 ppg and 8.2 rpg for San Jose State in 1956-57) had three touchdown catches in a 41-27 win against the San Diego Chargers in 1963. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers rookie WR Antwaan Randle El (member of Indiana's 1999 NCAA Tournament team) had a career-high eight pass receptions in a 24-6 setback against the Houston Texans in 2002. . . . Washington Redskins QB Norm Snead (averaged 7.8 ppg in four Wake Forest games as senior in 1960-61) passed for 350 yards - including three touchdowns - in a 34-21 setback against the Baltimore Colts in 1962. Six years later with the Philadelphia Eagles, Snead threw three TD passes in a 29-17 win against the New Orleans Saints in 1968. . . . Los Angeles Rams rookie HB Jack Wilson (Baylor hoops letterman in 1942) caught a 13-yard touchdown pass from Bob Waterfield in 38-17 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1946. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Roy Zimmerman (San Jose State hoops letterman as center in 1938 and 1939) threw three touchdown passes in a 40-14 win against the Boston Yanks in 1946. Six years earlier with the Washington Redskins as a rookie, Zimmerman returned a kickoff 37 yards and had a 61-yard punt in a 73-0 setback against the Chicago Bears in the 1940 NFL championship game. Bears B Ray Nolting (Cincinnati hoops letterman in 1936) had a 23-yard rushing TD in the title tilt. Ray Flaherty (four-sport Gonzaga athlete including hoops) coached the Redskins.

9: Minnesota Vikings WR Tom Adams (two-time All-MIAC honoree set Minnesota-Duluth single-season mark for rebounds with 367 as senior in 1961-62) caught two passes from Fran Tarkenton for 45 yards in a 37-23 setback against the Detroit Lions in 1962. . . . San Francisco 49ers rookie RB Joe Arenas (averaged 6.2 ppg in 1949-50 and 1950-51 for Nebraska-Omaha) rushed for two touchdowns against the Green Bay Packers in 1951. . . . Minnesota Vikings LB Matt Blair (played in 1970 NJCAA Tournament for Northeastern Oklahoma A&M hoops team finishing in seventh place) intercepted two passes in a 10-3 win against the Buffalo Bills in 1979. . . . Minnesota Vikings rookie QB Todd Bouman (South Dakota State transfer averaged 7.1 ppg and 3.3 rpg for St. Cloud State MN from 1993-94 through 1995-96) passed for 348 yards and four touchdowns in a 42-24 win against the Tennessee Titans in 2001. . . . Philadelphia Eagles WR Harold Carmichael (starter two seasons for Southern LA averaged 9.8 ppg and 10.6 rpg in 1969-70) had five of his NFL-high 67 pass receptions for 146 of his NFL-high 1,116 yards in a 24-23 win against the New York Jets in 1973. . . . Philadelphia Eagles CB Jimmy Carr (three-year hoops letterman for Morris Harvey WV appeared in NAIA Tournament in 1953 and 1954) had an interception in his second straight game in 1962. . . . New York Giants rookie TB Ed Danowski (Fordham hoops letterman in 1932-33) had a game-high 83 passing yards and chipped in with 59 rushing yards (including fourth-quarter touchdown) in 30-13 win against the Chicago Bears in the 1934 NFL championship contest. Giants E Ray Flaherty (four-sport Gonzaga athlete including hoops) had two pass receptions for 28 yards in his second straight NFL title tilt. Bears B Keith Molesworth (three-year hoops letterman for Monmouth IL in late 1920s) completed 4-of-9 passes, returned four punts for 67 yards and punted nine times for 40.7-yard average. Bears B Gene Ronzani (among Marquette's top four scorers in 1931-32 and 1932-33) caught one pass for 23 yards and returned an interception 16 yards. . . . Chicago Bears TE Mike Ditka (averaged 2.8 ppg and 2.6 rpg for Pittsburgh in 1958-59 and 1959-60) caught six passes for 155 yards in a 30-14 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1962. . . . Miami Dolphins QB Bob Griese (sophomore guard for Purdue in 1964-65) threw two first-quarter touchdown passes in a 28-10 win against the Detroit Lions in 1979. . . . Tampa Bay Buccaneers WR Vincent Jackson (Northern Colorado's scoring leader with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg) caught six passes for 131 yards in a 23-21 setback against the Philadelphia Eagles in 2012. . . . Tampa Bay Buccaneers QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) passed for 305 yards in a 15-12 win against the Detroit Lions in 2001. . . . St. Louis Cardinals QB Charley Johnson (transferred from Schreiner J.C. to New Mexico State to play hoops before concentrating on football) passed for 302 yards and five touchdowns (two for more than 70 yards) in a 52-20 win against the Dallas Cowboys in 1962. . . . Washington Redskins QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) threw three second-half touchdown passes in a 34-24 setback against the Dallas Cowboys in 1972. Two years later, Kilmer threw three second-quarter TD passes in a 23-17 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1974. . . . Chicago Bears QB Johnny Lujack (averaged 3.4 ppg as starting guard for Notre Dame in 1943-44) rushed for three touchdowns in a 45-21 win against the New York Yanks in 1951. . . . Houston Oilers TE Bob McLeod (all-time leading rebounder for Abilene Christian TX with 1,237 from 1957-58 through 1960-61 also ranks among school's top 10 career scorers) caught five passes for 114 yards - including a career-long 55-yard touchdown from George Blanda - in a 32-17 victory against the Oakland Raiders in 1962. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw two first-half touchdown passes in a 24-14 win against the San Diego Chargers in 2001.

10: New York Giants B Len Barnum (West Virginia Wesleyan hooper) had an interception in 27-0 setback against the Green Bay Packers in 1939 NFL championship game. . . . Miami Dolphins rookie WR Chris Chambers (played hoops briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) caught two touchdown passes in a 41-6 win against the Indianapolis Colts in 2001. . . . New York Giants QB Randy Dean (played in two hoop games in 1973-74 under Northwestern coach Tex Winter) threw his lone NFL touchdown pass in a 17-0 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1978. . . . San Diego Chargers TE Antonio Gates (second-team All-MAC selection in 2002 when Kent State finished runner-up in South Regional) caught two first-half touchdown passes from Philip Rivers in a 48-20 win against the Denver Broncos in 2006. . . . Cleveland Browns QB Otto Graham (Big Ten Conference runner-up in scoring as Northwestern sophomore in 1941-42 and junior in 1942-43) threw four touchdown passes in a 45-21 win against the Washington Redskins in 1950. . . . Cleveland Rams WR Ray Hamilton (Arkansas letterman for two SWC hoop champions from 1936 through 1938) caught a 70-yard touchdown pass in 26-13 setback against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1944. . . . Houston Texans WR DeAndre Hopkins (played in seven hoop games for Clemson in 2010-11) had 11 pass receptions - including two for touchdowns - in a 26-16 setback against the San Francisco 49ers in 2017. . . . Jacksonville Jaguars rookie WR Willie Jackson (started five hoops games for Florida in 1989-90) caught two fourth-quarter touchdown passes from Mark Brunell in a 41-31 setback against the Indianapolis Colts in 1995. . . . Denver Broncos QB Charley Johnson (transferred from Schreiner J.C. to New Mexico State to play hoops before concentrating on football) threw two first-half touchdown passes in a 30-23 win against the Oakland Raiders in 1972. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers QB Bobby Layne (Texas hooper in 1944-45) threw four touchdown passes in a 30-14 win against the Washington Redskins in 1961. . . . Chicago Cardinals rookie B Ike Mahoney (Creighton hooper in early 1920s) caught a 35-yard touchdown pass from Red Dunn (four-time Marquette hoops letterman first half of 1920s) in 59-0 win against the Milwaukee Badgers in 1925. . . . Rookie WR Bob McChesney (Hardin-Simmons TX hoops letterman in 1945-46) scored the New York Giants' only touchdown by catching a pass from Charlie Conerly in 9-7 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1950. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) completed 23-of-36 passes for 390 yards and four touchdowns in a 35-24 win against the Cleveland Browns in 2000. . . . New York Giants rookie B Kink Richards (Simpson IA hoops letterman) scored two second-half touchdowns in a 20-14 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1933. . . . Indianapolis Colts rookie WR Andre Rison (backup hoops guard for Michigan State in 1987-88) had five pass receptions for 135 yards in a 23-17 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1989. . . . Rookie B Gene Ronzani (among Marquette's top four scorers in 1931-32 and 1932-33) scored the Chicago Bears' lone touchdown with a 42-yard pass reception from Keith Molesworth (three-year hoops letterman for Monmouth IL in late 1920s) in 7-6 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1933. . . . New England Patriots WR Reggie Rucker (averaged 6.8 ppg and 3.8 rpg for Boston University in 1966-67) caught two second-quarter touchdown passes from Jim Plunkett in a 17-10 win against the New Orleans Saints in 1972. . . . New York Giants WR Del Shofner (Baylor hoops letterman in 1956) had three touchdown receptions in a 28-24 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1961. . . . Denver Broncos SE Lionel Taylor (led New Mexico Highlands in scoring average with 13.6 ppg in 1955-56 and 20.3 in 1956-57) had nine pass receptions for 171 yards in a 41-33 setback against the Los Angeles Chargers in 1960. . . . Chicago Bears WR Kendall Wright (Baylor hooper as freshman in 2008-09) had 10 pass receptions in a 33-7 win against the Cincinnati Bengals in 2017.

11: Philadelphia Eagles E Neill Armstrong (played one game under legendary Oklahoma A&M coach Hank Iba in 1944) caught a touchdown pass in his fourth consecutive contest in 1949. . . . Washington Redskins QB Sammy Baugh (TCU three-year hoops letterman was All-SWC honorable mention selection as senior in 1936-37) threw three touchdown passes in a 53-27 setback against the Los Angeles Rams in 1949. Rams E Bob Shaw (Ohio State hoops starter in 1942 and 1943) had four TD pass receptions. . . . New York Giants B Len Barnum (West Virginia Wesleyan hoper) had a nine-yard run from scrimmage and 20-yard pass reception in 23-17 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1938 NFL championship game. Packers E Wayland Becker (Marquette hoops letterman in mid-1930s) had a game-high 78 receiving yards. Giants TB Ed Danowski (Fordham hoops letterman in 1932-33) threw two touchdown passes, including a 21-yarder to rookie E Hap Barnard (four-year hoops letterman for Central Oklahoma played in 1938 NAIA Tournament as senior). C-LB Mel Hein (Washington State hoops letterman in 1930), the only offensive lineman earning NFL MVP award, recovered a fumble near midfield to help set up a Giants TD. Giants E Jim Lee Howell (All-SWC first-five selection as Arkansas senior in 1935-36) had two pass receptions. Giants TB Tuffy Leemans (three-year hoops letterman for George Washington in mid-1930s) had a six-yard rushing TD. . . . Philadelphia Eagles CB Jimmy Carr (three-year hoops letterman for Morris Harvey WV appeared in NAIA Tournament in 1953 and 1954) had an interception in his second consecutive contest in 1960. Pittsburgh Steelers RB John Henry Johnson (made 5-of-8 FGAs in five games for Saint Mary's in 1950-51) scored two first-half touchdowns - including an 87-yard run from scrimmage - in 27-21 win against the Eagles. . . . Miami Dolphins WR Chris Chambers (played briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) caught two third-quarter touchdown passes in a 23-21 win against the San Diego Chargers in 2005. Chargers TE Antonio Gates (second-team All-MAC selection in 2002 when Kent State finished runner-up in South Regional) caught 13 passes for 123 yards. Six years later, Gates caught two TD passes from Philip Rivers in a 37-10 win against the Buffalo Bills in 2011. . . . New Orleans Saints rookie WR Eugene Goodlow (scored 38 points in 19 games for Kansas State in 1977-78 and 1978-79) caught a career-high seven passes in a 20-17 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1983. . . . Cleveland Browns QB Otto Graham (Big Ten Conference runner-up in scoring as Northwestern sophomore in 1941-42 and junior in 1942-43) threw three touchdown passes in a 35-24 win against the Chicago Cardinals in 1955. . . . In his lone professional game, Oakland Raiders QB Charlie Green (averaged 3.7 ppg and 2 rpg for Wittenberg OH runner-up in 1963 NCAA Division II Tournament) completed both pass attempts for a total of 17 yards in a 28-10 win against the Denver Broncos in 1966. . . . New York Giants TB Hinkey Haines (Lebanon Valley PA transfer earned hoops letter for Penn State in 1920 and 1921) rushed for a 60-yard touchdown in a 13-0 win against the New York Yankees in 1927. . . . Dallas Cowboys DB Manny Hendrix (All-WAC second-team selection for Utah as senior in 1985-86 averaged 12.1 ppg and team-high 5.1 apg as sophomore) had an interception in a 24-17 win against the Washington Redskins in 1988. . . . New York Jets RB Johnny Johnson (averaged 11.2 ppg, 6.5 rpg and 3.2 apg in 1988-89 after majority of hoop team members walked off San Jose State squad) rushed for 155 yards in a 3-0 win against the Washington Redskins in 1993. . . . San Francisco 49ers DB Ronnie Lott (USC hooper as junior in 1979-80) had two interceptions in a 23-10 win against the Buffalo Bills in 1983. . . . Chicago Bears QB Johnny Lujack (averaged 3.4 ppg as starting guard for Notre Dame in 1943-44) threw six of his league-high 23 touchdown passes in a 52-21 win against the Chicago Cardinals in 1949. . . . New York Titans WR Art Powell (averaged 10.5 ppg and 8.2 rpg for San Jose State in 1956-57) had 10 catches for 179 yards - including two touchdowns (one for 72 yards) - in a 31-28 win against the Oakland Raiders in 1960. Six years later with the Raiders, Powell caught two TD passes from Tom Flores (46 and 45 yards) in a 28-10 win against the Denver Broncos in 1966. . . . Atlanta Falcons WR Andre Rison (backup hoops guard for Michigan State in 1987-88) had two of his league-high 15 touchdown receptions in a 27-24 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 1993. . . . Atlanta Falcons LB Marion Rushing (Southern Illinois hooper from 1954-55 through 1956-57) had an interception in 16-10 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1966. . . . New York Giants LB Tom Scott (hoops letterman as Virginia forward in 1951) returned an interception 14 yards for touchdown in 17-3 win against the Washington Redskins in 1960.

12: Washington Redskins RB Cliff Battles (four seasons of varsity hoops for West Virginia Wesleyan) opened the game's scoring with a seven-yard rushing touchdown and LB Eddie Kawal (Illinois hoops letterman in 1930) returned an interception 19 yards in 28-21 win against the Chicago Bears in the 1937 NFL Championship. Ray Flaherty (four-sport Gonzaga athlete including hoops) coached the Redskins. Bears E Eggs Manske (point guard led Northwestern to share of 1933 Big Ten Conference crown) had a four-yard pass reception touchdown plus 51-yard catch, Bears B Ray Nolting (Cincinnati hoops letterman in 1936) rushed for 31 yards on 10 carries, Bears B Gene Ronzani (among Marquette's top four scorers in 1931-32 and 1932-33) returned an interception 16 yards and Bears B Keith Molesworth (three-year hoops letterman for Monmouth IL in late 1920s) completed a pass for 35 yards to rookie E Dick Plasman (Vanderbilt two-year starting center named to 1936 All-SEC Tournament second five). Plasman also had two sacks. . . . Washington Redskins QB Sammy Baugh (TCU three-year letterman was All-SWC honorable mention selection as senior in 1936-37) threw three touchdown passes in a 28-21 win against the New York Giants in 1948. Redskins E Hugh Taylor (OCU leading scorer with 11.4 ppg as senior in 1947) caught two second-half TD passes from Baugh. Six years later, Taylor had three first-half TD receptions in a 37-20 win against the Chicago Cardinals in 1954. . . . . . . Kansas City Chiefs QB Len Dawson (Purdue hooper in 1956-57) completed 23-of-37 passes for 355 yards in a 34-25 setback against the Buffalo Bills in 1965. . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Al Dixon (Iowa State hooper in 1975-76 and 1976-77) had a career-high 102 receiving yards (on six catches) in 21-16 setback against the Los Angeles Raiders in 1982. . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught two first-half touchdown passes in a 31-28 win against the Minnesota Vikings in 1999. . . . Baltimore Ravens TE Todd Heap (grabbed 14 rebounds in 11 games for Arizona State in 1999-00) caught two touchdown passes in a 37-14 win against the New York Giants in 2004. . . . Los Angeles Rams E Red Hickey (three-time All-SWC selection and member of Arkansas' 1941 Final Four team) opened a game's scoring with a touchdown reception of more than 20 yards for the third time in less than a month in 1948. . . . Green Bay Packers RB Paul Hornung (averaged 6.1 ppg in 10 contests for Notre Dame in 1954-55) scored five touchdowns - including two via pass receptions (50 and 65 yards from Bart Starr) - in a 42-27 win against the Baltimore Colts in 1965. . . . Washington Redskins QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) threw two second-quarter touchdown passes in a 28-3 win against the Arizona Cardinals in 1999. . . . Phoenix Cardinals RB Johnny Johnson (averaged 11.2 ppg, 6.5 rpg and 3.2 apg in 1988-89 after majority of hoop team members walked off San Jose State squad) rushed for 156 yards and two touchdowns in a 19-0 win against the New York Giants in 1992. . . . Chicago Bears rookie QB Johnny Lujack (averaged 3.4 ppg as starting guard for Notre Dame in 1943-44) threw two first-half touchdown passes in a 24-21 setback against the Chicago Cardinals in 1948. . . . Dallas Cowboys RB Preston Pearson (swingman averaged 8.7 ppg and 6 rpg as Illinois senior in 1966-67) scored two touchdowns in a 42-35 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 1977. Cowboys QB Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) completed 14-of-19 passes for three TDs. Six years earlier, Staubach threw three first-half TD passes in a 42-14 win against the New York Giants in 1971. . . . Buffalo Bills QB George Ratterman (third-leading scorer with 11.7 ppg for Notre Dame in 1944-45) threw three touchdown passes in a 28-17 win against the Baltimore Colts in the 1948 AAFC playoffs. . . . Cincinnati Bengals rookie WR Patrick Robinson (starting guard for Tennessee State in 1990-91 when averaging 6.7 ppg and 2.9 apg) had a career-high three pass receptions in a 7-2 setback against the New England Patriots in 1993. . . . Philadelphia Eagles LB George Tarasovic (led NLU forerunner Northeast Junior College LA with 21 ppg in 1950-51) returned an interception 40 yards for a touchdown in a 47-13 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1965. . . . New York Giants E Will Walls (starting forward with TCU for three years from 1935 through 1937) caught a 33-yard touchdown pass in regular-season ending 31-7 win against the Washington Redskins in 1943. . . . Philadelphia Eagles DE Norm Willey (Marshall hoops center in late 1940s) opened the game's scoring by recovering a fumble for touchdown in 29-14 win against the New York Giants in 1954.

13: New York Giants TE Kevin Boss (averaged 3 ppg and 2.7 rpg while shooting 51.9% from floor for Western Oregon in 2004-05 and 2005-06) had a career-high seven pass receptions in 45-38 setback against the Philadelphia Eagles in 2009. . . . Detroit Lions E Cloyce Box (combined with twin brother Boyce to help West Texas win Border Conference hoop championship in 1943) closed out 1952 campaign with his third consecutive contest contributing three pass receptions for touchdowns (including 77-yarder). . . . Kansas City Chiefs QB Len Dawson (Purdue hooper in 1956-57) threw four touchdown passes in a 49-6 win against the San Diego Chargers in 1964. . . . Chicago Bears rookie WR George Farmer (teammate of UCLA legend Lew Alcindor in 1968-69) caught a career-high nine passes for 142 yards in 35-17 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1970. . . . Ray Flaherty (four-sport Gonzaga athlete including hoops) coached the Washington Redskins in 1942 when they registered a 14-6 win against the Chicago Bears in the NFL championship game. Bears B Ray Nolting (Cincinnati hoops letterman in 1936) rushed for 25 yards on eight carries, caught one pass for 11 yards, had one interception and returned a kickoff for 23 yards. . . . Chicago Cardinals QB King Hill (Rice letterman in 1955-56 and 1956-57) threw two second-half touchdown passes in a 35-20 setback against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1959. . . . Green Bay Packers RB Paul Hornung (averaged 6.1 ppg in 10 contests for Notre Dame in 1954-55) rushed for three touchdowns in a 36-14 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 1959. . . . St. Louis Cardinals QB Charley Johnson (transferred from Schreiner J.C. to New Mexico State to play hoops before concentrating on football) passed for 371 of a league-high 3,045 yards - including two third-quarter touchdowns - in a 36-34 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1964. . . . New Orleans Saints QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) threw three touchdown passes in a 38-27 setback against the San Francisco 49ers in 1970. The next year with the Washington Redskins, Kilmer threw three TD passes in a 38-24 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1971. . . . Detroit Lions QB Bobby Layne (Texas hooper in 1944-45) threw two second-quarter touchdown passes in a 41-6 win against the Dallas Texans in 1952. The next year, Layne threw two first-half TD passes in a 27-16 win against the New York Giants in 1953. In 1959 with the Pittsburgh Steelers, Layne threw four TD passes in a 35-20 win against the Chicago Cardinals. . . . New York Giants DE George Martin (Oregon hoops teammate of freshman sensation Ron Lee in 1972-73) returned a fumble recovery 20 yards for touchdown in 20-10 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1981. . . . Los Angeles Rams rookie WR Bucky Pope (two-time All-Carolinas Conference pick for Catawba NC averaged 19.4 ppg from 1961-62 through 1963-64) opened the game's scoring by catching a 95-yard touchdown pass from Bill Munson in 24-24 tie against the Green Bay Packers in 1964. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Norm Snead (averaged 7.8 ppg in four Wake Forest games as senior in 1960-61) passed for 301 yards - including three second-quarter touchdowns - in a 36-34 setback against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1964. . . . Dallas Cowboys P Ron Widby (three-time All-SEC selection for Tennessee from 1964-65 through 1966-67 averaged 14.5 ppg and 8.3 rpg as sophomore, 17.3 ppg and 8 rpg as junior and 22.1 ppg and 8.7 rpg as senior) punted seven times for 324 yards (46.3 average) in a 27-10 win against the Baltimore Colts in 1969. . . . San Francisco 49ers E Billy Wilson (averaged 3.3 ppg as senior letterman for San Jose State in 1950-51) caught a touchdown pass in last four games to finish with a league-high 10 TD catches in 1953.

14: Washington Redskins QB Sammy Baugh (TCU three-year hoops letterman was All-SWC honorable mention selection as senior in 1936-37) threw three touchdown passes in a 40-13 win against the Boston Yanks in 1947. Redskins B Dick Poillon (Canisius hooper in early 1940s) scored two TDs. . . . Green Bay Packers LB Fred Carr (played for defending NCAA champion Texas Western in 1967 playoffs) had two interceptions in a 22-5 setback against the Los Angeles Rams in 1975. . . . Kansas City Chiefs QB Len Dawson (Purdue hooper in 1956-57) had a 43-yard rushing touchdown in 35-3 win against the Boston Patriots in 1963. . . . In 1930, the Green Bay Packers' lone score in a 6-6 tie against the Portsmouth Spartans was a 15-yard pass from Red Dunn (four-year Marquette letterman first half of 1920s) to rookie Weert Engelmann (All-NCC selection for South Dakota State). . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught two touchdown passes in a 45-17 win against the Detroit Lions in 2003. . . . Cleveland Browns QB Otto Graham (Big Ten Conference runner-up in scoring as Northwestern sophomore in 1941-42 and junior in 1942-43) threw two second-half touchdown passes in a 37-34 setback against the New York Giants in 1952. . . . San Francisco 49ers RB Terry Kirby (averaged 3.4 ppg as Virginia freshman in 1989-90 and 2.1 as sophomore in 1990-91) rushed for two touchdowns in a 35-13 win against the Detroit Lions in 1998. . . . Cleveland Browns RB Greg Pruitt (Oklahoma frosh hooper in 1969-70) rushed for 214 yards on 26 carries - including three touchdowns - in a 40-14 win against the Kansas City Chiefs in 1975. Browns WR Reggie Rucker (averaged 6.8 ppg and 3.8 rpg for Boston University in 1966-67) had six pass receptions for 130 yards.

15: Miami Dolphins LB Larry Ball (played eight hoop games for Louisville as sophomore in 1968-69 before persuaded by coach Lee Corso to concentrate on football) had an interception in a 34-7 win against the Detroit Lions in 1973. . . . Miami Dolphins WR Chris Chambers (played briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) caught seven passes for 138 yards in a 23-17 win against the Oakland Raiders in 2002. . . . Detroit Lions TB Dutch Clark (four-time All-Rocky Mountain Conference hoops choice for Colorado College) rushed seven times for a game-high 80 yards - including 40-yard touchdown - in 26-7 win against the New York Giants in 1935 NFL championship contest. TB Ed Danowski (Fordham hoops letterman in 1932-33) threw a 42-yard pass for the Giants' lone touchdown. Giants rookie E Tod Goodwin (West Virginia hoops letterman in 1933) had two pass receptions for 26 yards. Giants B Kink Richards (Simpson IA hoops letterman) rushed for 31 yards on 10 carries and returned one kickoff for 30 yards. . . . Cincinnati Bengals LB James Francis (averaged 3 ppg and 3.6 rpg for Baylor in 1986-87 and 1987-88) had two interceptions - returning one 42 yards for a touchdown - in a 21-13 win against the Houston Texans in 1996. . . . A fourth-quarter touchdown reception by rookie E Dale Gentry (averaged 5.3 ppg for Washington State's 1941 NCAA Tournament runner-up) propelled the Los Angeles Dons to 17-17 tie against the Chicago Rockets in 1946. . . . New Orleans Saints WR Eugene Goodlow (scored 38 points in 19 games for Kansas State in 1977-78 and 1978-79) caught five passes for 135 yards - including 76-yard touchdown from Bobby Hebert - in a 31-19 setback against the San Francisco 49ers in 1985. . . . Miami Dolphins QB Bob Griese (sophomore guard for Purdue in 1964-65) threw four touchdown passes to Paul Warfield in a 34-7 win against the Detroit Lions in 1973. . . . Dallas Cowboys DB Manny Hendrix (All-WAC second-team selection for Utah as senior in 1985-86 averaged 12.1 ppg and team-high 5.1 apg as sophomore) recorded a safety in a 25-13 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1991. . . . Los Angeles Rams E Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch (starting center for Michigan hoops in 1944) caught two touchdown passes from Norm Van Brocklin in a 37-21 win against the Baltimore Colts in 1957. . . . St. Louis Cardinals QB Charley Johnson (transferred from Schreiner J.C. to New Mexico State to play hoops before concentrating on football) passed for 299 yards - including two second-quarter touchdowns - in a 28-24 setback against the Dallas Cowboys in 1963. . . . New Orleans Saints QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) threw two first-half touchdown passes in a 24-14 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1968. . . . Frankfort Yellow Jackets B Ken Mercer (three-year letterman as Simpson IA forward) rushed for three touchdowns in a 19-0 win against the Chicago Bears in 1928. . . . Baltimore Colts RB Preston Pearson (swingman averaged 8.7 ppg and 6 rpg as Illinois senior in 1966-67) had two pass reception touchdowns - including 61-yarder from Earl Morrall - in a 28-24 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1968. . . . New York Giants E Buster Poole (three-year Arkansas letterman was senior captain in 1936-37) caught four passes for 40 yards in a 24-14 setback against the Chicago Bears in the 1946 NFL championship game. . . . Oakland Raiders WR Art Powell (averaged 10.5 ppg and 8.2 rpg for San Jose State in 1956-57) caught two of his AFL-high 16 touchdown passes in a 35-31 win against the Denver Broncos in 1963. Broncos TE Gene Prebola (Boston University hooper in 1957-58) had four pass receptions for 106 yards. Broncos SE Lionel Taylor (led New Mexico Highlands in scoring average with 13.6 ppg in 1955-56 and 20.3 in 1956-57) had 10 of his AFL-leading 78 pass receptions. . . . New England Patriots TE-LB John Tanner (JC recruit averaged 3.5 ppg and 3.4 rpg for Tennessee Tech in 1968-69) played on offense, defense and special teams in a 34-27 setback against the Miami Dolphins in 1974 finale. . . . Miami Dolphins DE Jason Taylor (averaged 8 ppg and 5.4 rpg for Akron in 1994-95) had three sacks in a 23-17 win against the Oakland Raiders in 2002. . . . Washington Redskins rookie QB Harry Theofiledes (averaged 9.3 ppg and 5 rpg for Waynesburg PA in 1964-65 and 1965-66) threw a 39-yard touchdown pass in 14-3 win against the Detroit Lions in 1968 season finale. . . . Tennessee Titans WR Kendall Wright (Baylor hooper as freshman in 2008-09) caught 12 passes for 150 yards in a 37-34 setback against the Arizona Cardinals in 2013.

16: Cincinnati Bengals QB Ken Anderson (swingman finished Augustana IL career in early 1970s as fifth-leading scorer in school history with 1,044 points) threw three touchdown passes for the third time in last four games of 1973 campaign. . . . San Francisco 49ers RB Joe Arenas (averaged 6.2 ppg in 1949-50 and 1950-51 for Nebraska-Omaha) scored the go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter with a 67-yard punt return against the Baltimore Colts in 1956. . . . Washington Redskins B Steve Bagarus (Notre Dame hooper in early 1940s) had a 38-yard pass reception for the game's first touchdown in a 15-14 setback against the Cleveland Rams in 1945 NFL championship contest. E Jim Benton (forward was Arkansas' third-leading scorer in SWC play as senior in 1937-38) scored the Rams' first TD with a 37-yard pass reception from Bob Waterfield en route to game highs of nine catches and 125 receiving yards. Rams E Steve Pritko (Villanova two-year hoops letterman) caught two passes for 17 yards. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers DB Tony Dungy (roommate of Flip Saunders averaged 2.6 ppg for Minnesota in 1973-74 under coach Bill Musselman) intercepted a pass in second consecutive contest in 1978. . . . Carolina Panthers DE Greg Hardy (Ole Miss backup forward as freshman in 2006-07) had two sacks and five tackles in a 31-7 victory against the San Diego Chargers in 2012. . . . Los Angeles Rams E Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch (starting hoops center for Michigan hoops in 1944) had three of his league-high 17 touchdown receptions in a 42-14 win against the Green Bay Packers in 1951. . . . San Diego Chargers WR Vincent Jackson (Northern Colorado's scoring leader with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg) caught three touchdown passes from Philip Rivers in a 34-7 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 2010. . . . St. Louis Cardinals QB Charley Johnson (transferred from Schreiner J.C. to New Mexico State to play hoops before concentrating on football) passed for 386 yards - including two first-half touchdowns (one of them 77 yards to Sonny Randle) - in a 45-35 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1962. . . . Washington Redskins QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) threw four touchdown passes - three to Larry Brown - in a 38-20 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1973. . . . Green Bay Packers E Ron Kramer (three-time All-Big Ten Conference selection was Michigan's MVP each season and All-American as senior in 1956-57) opened the game's scoring with a 45-yard touchdown catch in 20-17 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1962. . . . San Francisco 49ers E R.C. Owens (led small colleges with 27.1 rpg in 1953-54 while also averaging 23.5 ppg for College of Idaho) caught two touchdown passes from John Brodie in a 27-24 setback against the Baltimore Colts in 1961. . . . Dallas Cowboys WR Terrell Owens (UTC hooper from 1993-94 through 1995-96 started five games) caught two first-half touchdown passes from Tony Romo in a 38-28 win against the Atlanta Falcons in 2006. . . . Dallas Cowboys RB Preston Pearson (swingman averaged 8.7 ppg and 6 rpg as Illinois senior in 1966-67) had five pass receptions for 108 yards in a 35-34 win against the Washington Redskins in 1979. Cowboys QB Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) passed for 336 yards and three TDs. Six years earlier, Staubach completed 14-of-19 passes - including three touchdowns - in a 30-3 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1973. . . . New York Giants DB Emlen Tunnell (forward was top reserve for Toledo team compiling 22-4 record and finishing second in 1943 NIT) returned a punt 74 yards for touchdown in 27-17 win against the New York Yanks in 1951.

17: New York Giants E Red Badgro (first-five All-Pacific Coast Conference pick as forward in 1926-27 when named USC's MVP) had a 29-yard pass reception for a touchdown in a 23-21 setback against the Chicago Bears in the 1933 NFL championship game. Giants B Dale Burnett (two-time all-conference hooper for Emporia State KS) had game highs with five catches for 94 receiving yards. Bears B Keith Molesworth (three-year hoops letterman for Monmouth IL in late 1920s) completed 2-of-5 passes for 24 yards, rushed once for five yards, returned three punts for 33 yards and punted 10 times for a 39.8-yard average. Giants rookie B Kink Richards (Simpson IA hoops letterman) had a team-high 40 rushing yards and returned one kickoff 36 yards. Bears rookie B Gene Ronzani (among Marquette's top four scorers in 1931-32 and 1932-33) rushed for a game-high 73 yards. . . . Kansas City Chiefs QB Len Dawson (Purdue hooper in 1956-57) threw three first-half touchdown passes to Otis Taylor (backup small forward for Prairie View A&M) in a 38-24 win against the Denver Broncos in 1967. . . . Chicago Bears rookie TE Mike Ditka (averaged 2.8 ppg and 2.6 rpg for Pittsburgh in 1958-59 and 1959-60) caught eight passes for 102 yards - including two touchdowns - in a 52-35 win against the Minnesota Vikings in 1961. Vikings DB Dick Pesonen (two-year Minnesota-Duluth hoops letterman was starting guard in 1959-60) returned five kickoffs for 133 yards. Vikings WR Jerry Reichow (Iowa hooper in 1954-55) caught three TD passes from Fran Tarkenton. Reichow had a total of seven TD pass receptions in the last five games of season. . . . Denver Broncos TE Wesley Duke (averaged 9.8 ppg and 5.9 rpg for Mercer from 2001-02 through 2004-05) caught a touchdown pass from Jake Plummer in 28-17 win against the Buffalo Bills in 2005. Broncos WR Rod Smith (swingman was Missouri Southern State hoops letterman as sophomore in 1990-91) caught 11 passes for 137 yards. . . . Green Bay Packers FB Ted Fritsch Sr. (Wisconsin-Stevens Point hoops letterman in 1940-41 and 1941-42) scored two second-quarter touchdowns - one rushing and one receiving - in a 14-7 win against the New York Giants in 1944 NFL championship contest. Giants LB Mel Hein (Washington State hoops letterman in 1930) had an interception. . . . Miami Dolphins rookie QB Bob Griese (sophomore guard for Purdue in 1964-65) threw three first-half touchdown passes in a 41-32 win against the Boston Patriots in 1967. . . . Houston Oilers WR Bill Groman (led Heidelberg OH in scoring average as sophomore and junior while averaging 14.6 ppg and 4.8 rpg from 1954-55 through 1957-58) caught two touchdown passes from George Blanda in a 47-16 win against the Oakland Raiders in 1961. . . . New Orleans Saints WR Willie Jackson (started five hoops games for Florida in 1989-90) had eight pass receptions for 156 yards in a 34-21 setback against the St. Louis Rams in 2001. . . . Denver Broncos QB Charley Johnson (transferred from Schreiner J.C. to New Mexico State to play hoops before concentrating on football) threw three touchdown passes in a 45-21 win against the New England Patriots in 1972. . . . New Orleans Saints QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) opened the game's scoring with an 80-yard touchdown pass to Danny Abramowicz in a 30-14 win against the Washington Redskins in 1967. Ten years later with the Washington Redskins, Kilmer threw two first-quarter TD passes in a 17-14 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1977. . . . Chicago Bears QB Johnny Lujack (averaged 3.4 ppg as starting guard for Notre Dame in 1943-44) completed 15-of-29 passes but threw three interceptions in a 24-14 playoff setback against the Los Angeles Rams in 1950. . . . New York Giants rookie WR Bob McChesney (Hardin-Simmons TX hoops letterman in 1945-46) had a pass reception for 19 yards in 8-3 setback against the Cleveland Browns in 1950 playoff game. Browns rookie B Dom Moselle (leading hoops scorer for Wisconsin-Superior in 1947-48 and 1948-49) returned two kickoffs for 55 yards. Giants DB Otto Schnellbacher (averaged 11 ppg in four-year Kansas career, earning All-Big Six/Seven Conference honors each season) had an interception. . . . San Francisco 49ers WR Terrell Owens (UTC hooper from 1993-94 through 1995-96 started five games) caught 20 passes for 283 yards in a 17-0 win against the Chicago Bears in 2000. . . . Chicago Bears rookie K Mac Percival (three-year hoops letterman was part of squad winning Texas Tech's first SWC championship in major sport in 1960-61) kicked three field goals in a 23-14 win against the Atlanta Falcons in 1967. . . . Cleveland Browns RB Greg Pruitt (Oklahoma frosh hooper in 1969-70) rushed for 182 yards on 22 carries in a 48-16 setback against the Cincinnati Bengals in 1978. Pruitt closed out the campaign with at least 113 yards rushing in his last three contests. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Norm Snead (averaged 7.8 ppg in four Wake Forest games as senior in 1960-61) threw three touchdown passes in a 28-24 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1967. Five years later with the New York Giants, Snead threw two second-quarter TD passes in a 23-3 win against the Dallas Cowboys in 1972. . . . St. Louis Cardinals rookie WR Dave Stief (hoop teammate of Portland State All-American Freeman Williams in 1977-78) had career highs of nine pass receptions for 183 yards in a 42-21 win against the Atlanta Falcons in 1978.

18: St. Louis Cardinals DE Bubba Baker (averaged 4.1 ppg and 3.5 rpg as forward-center for Colorado State from 1974-75 through 1977-78) posted three sacks against the Philadelphia Eagles in a 1983 game. . . . Washington Redskins TE Jean Fugett (leading scorer and rebounder for Amherst MA as junior in 1970-71) had four pass receptions for 61 yards in a 35-20 setback against the Minnesota Vikings in 1976 playoff game. . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught two first-half touchdown passes in a 35-19 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1999. . . . Washington Redskins QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) passed for 298 yards - including two fourth-quarter touchdowns - in a 35-20 playoff setback against the Minnesota Vikings in 1976. . . . Boston Patriots rookie SE Oscar Lofton (collected 31 points and 30 rebounds in 12 games for Southeastern Louisiana in 1958-59) caught two third-quarter touchdown passes (37 and 39 yards) in a 37-21 setback against the Houston Oilers in 1960. . . . Carolina Panthers DE Julius Peppers (averaged 5.7 ppg and 3.7 rpg while shooting 60.7% from floor for North Carolina in 1999-00 and 2000-01) returned a fumble recovery 60 yards for a touchdown in a 34-31 setback against the Atlanta Falcons in 2004. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers WR Antwaan Randle El (member of Indiana's 1999 NCAA Tournament team) had five pass receptions for 149 yards in a 33-30 win against the New York Giants in 2004. . . . Green Bay Packers CB Quinten Rollins (led Miami OH in steals all four seasons from 2010-11 through 2013-14 including MAC as senior) had a career-high eight tackles in 30-27 win against the Chicago Bears in 2016. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers LB Bill Saul (averaged 6.1 ppg for Penn State in 1959-60) returned an interception eight yards in a 57-33 win against the Atlanta Falcons in 1966. . . . Miami Dolphins rookie QB John Stofa (averaged 5.8 ppg and 5.4 rpg for Buffalo in 1961-62) passed for 307 yards and four touchdowns in a 29-28 win against the Houston Oilers in 1966. . . . Indianapolis Colts TE Erik Swoope (averaged 2.6 ppg and 1.7 rpg for Miami FL from 2010-11 through 2013-14) caught a 27-yard touchdown pass from Andrew Luck in 34-6 win against the Minnesota Vikings in 2016. . . . Miami Dolphins DE Jason Taylor (averaged 8 ppg and 5.4 rpg for Akron in 1994-95) had three sacks in a 24-20 win against the New York Jets in 2005.

19: Kansas City Chiefs LB Bobby Bell (first African-American hooper for Minnesota in 1960-61) returned an interception 26 yards for a touchdown in a 22-9 win against the Buffalo Bills in 1971. . . . E Billy Dewell (three-time All-SWC first-team pick for SMU in late 1930s) and E Mal Kutner (two-year Texas hoops letterman in early 1940s) each had one of the Chicago Cardinals' three pass receptions in a 7-0 setback against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1948 NFL championship game. . . . New Orleans Saints rookie TE Jimmy Graham (part-time starter for Miami FL averaged 4.2 ppg and 4.2 rpg from 2005-06 through 2008-09) caught two first-half touchdown passes from Drew Brees in a 30-24 setback against the Baltimore Ravens in 2010. . . . Baltimore Ravens TE Todd Heap (grabbed 14 rebounds in 11 games for Arizona State in 1999-00) caught nine passes - including two touchdowns - in a 48-3 win against the Green Bay Packers in 2005. . . . Oakland Raiders TE Teyo Johnson (part-time starting forward for Stanford averaged 4.9 ppg and 3 rpg in 2000-01 and 2001-02) opened the game's scoring with an 18-yard touchdown pass from Kerry Collins in 40-35 win against the Tennessee Titans in 2004. . . . Houston Texans WR Jacoby Jones (part-time starter averaged 3.4 ppg and 3.7 rpg for Lane TN in 2004-05 and 2005-06) had a career-high seven pass receptions in 31-17 setback against the Tennessee Titans in 2010. . . . Miami Dolphins rookie RB Terry Kirby (averaged 3.4 ppg as Virginia freshman in 1989-90 and 2.1 as sophomore in 1990-91) had nine pass receptions for 148 yards in a 47-34 setback against the Buffalo Bills in 1993. . . . Detroit Lions QB Bobby Layne (Texas hooper in 1944-45) threw two second-half touchdown passes in a 14-10 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1954. . . . Green Bay Packers TE Rich McGeorge (all-league hooper for Elon averaged 13.7 ppg and 9.1 rpg while making 59% of his field-goal attempts) had a career-high five pass receptions in 27-6 setback against the Miami Dolphins in 1971. . . . Cleveland Browns rookie HB Ara Parseghian (Miami of Ohio hooper in 1946-47 and 1947-48) rushed for 14 yards on four carries in a 49-7 win against the Buffalo Bills in 1948 AAFC championship game. . . . Dallas Cowboys RB Preston Pearson (swingman averaged 8.7 ppg and 6 rpg as Illinois senior in 1966-67) rushed 13 times for 43 yards and caught six passes for 41 yards in a 14-12 playoff setback against the Los Angeles Rams in 1976. . . . Washington Redskins CB Lonnie Sanders (averaged 10.9 ppg and 5.7 rpg as Michigan State forward in 1961-62) closed out the 1965 campaign with an interception in his second straight game. . . . New York Jets DE Jason Taylor (averaged 8 ppg and 5.4 rpg for Akron in 1994-95) recorded a safety in a 22-17 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2010. . . . Kansas City Chiefs FL Otis Taylor (backup small forward for Prairie View A&M) caught a touchdown pass in each of last three games of his rookie season in 1965. . . . E Will Walls (starting forward with TCU for three years from 1935 through 1937) had one of the New York Giants' four pass receptions in a 28-0 setback against the Washington Redskins in 1943 NFL championship game. . . . San Diego Chargers DB Bud Whitehead (averaged 2.8 ppg and 2.5 rpg in 15 games for Florida State in 1959-60) had two interceptions in a 24-14 win against the Oakland Raiders in 1965.

20: Carolina Panthers rookie TE Luther Broughton (forward scored five points in five games for Furman in 1994-95) scored the go-ahead touchdown with a 68-yard reception in fourth quarter of 20-13 win against the St. Louis Rams in 1998. . . . QB Len Dawson (Purdue hooper in 1956-57) threw a 19-yard touchdown pass in the fourth quarter to give the Kansas City Chiefs a 13-6 playoff win against the New York Jets in 1969. . . . San Francisco 49ers WR Bruce Ellington (South Carolina's leading scorer as freshman point guard with 12.8 ppg in 2010-11 before averaging 11.1 ppg as sophomore) scored two touchdowns - one receiving/one rushing - in a 38-35 setback against the San Diego Chargers in 2014. . . . New York Giants DB Percy Ellsworth (appeared in all four of Virginia's NCAA tourney contests for 1995 Midwest Regional finalist) had two interceptions - including one for a 43-yard touchdown - in a 28-7 win against the Kansas City Chiefs in 1998. . . . Tennessee Titans WR Justin Gage (averaged 2.1 ppg and 2.9 rpg for Missouri from 1999-00 through 2001-02) caught two first-half touchdown passes from Vince Young in a 27-24 win against the Miami Dolphins in 2009. . . . San Diego Chargers TE Antonio Gates (second-team All-MAC selection in 2002 when Kent State finished runner-up in South Regional) caught two second-half touchdown passes from Philip Rivers in a 38-35 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 2014. . . . Minnesota Vikings TE Andrew Glover (All-SWAC second-team selection as senior in 1990-91 when leading Grambling with 16.2 ppg and 8.6 rpg while pacing league in field-goal shooting) caught two touchdown passes from Randall Cunningham in a 50-10 win against the Jacksonville Jaguars in 1998. . . . Baltimore Ravens TE Todd Heap (grabbed 14 rebounds in 11 games for Arizona State in 1999-00) caught two first-quarter touchdown passes from Joe Flacco in a 31-7 win against the Chicago Bears in 2009. . . . San Diego Chargers WR Vincent Jackson (Northern Colorado's scoring leader with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg) caught two touchdown passes from Philip Rivers in a 27-24 win against the Cincinnati Bengals in 2009. . . . Tampa Bay Buccaneers QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) passed for 346 yards and four touchdowns in a 30-28 setback against the Atlanta Falcons in 2003. . . . Phoenix Cardinals RB Johnny Johnson (averaged 11.2 ppg, 6.5 rpg and 3.2 apg in 1988-89 after majority of hoop team members walked off San Jose State squad) rushed for 146 yards in a 16-13 setback against the Indianapolis Colts in 1992. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) passed for 306 yards in a 27-13 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 2009. . . . Houston Oilers QB Gifford Nielsen (BYU swingman averaged 6.5 ppg and 2.7 rpg in 1973-74 and 1974-75) passed for a career-high 377 yards - including three touchdowns to Dave Casper - in a 21-20 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1981. . . . Kansas City Chiefs WR Stan Rome (All-ACC second-team choice as Clemson junior averaged from 10.4 to 15.3 ppg while hitting 53% of FGAs from 1974-75 through 1977-78) scored the game's lone touchdown with a 15-yard pass reception in a 10-6 win against the Minnesota Vikings in 1981. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Norm Snead (averaged 7.8 ppg in four Wake Forest games as senior in 1960-61) threw two first-half touchdown passes in a 30-20 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1970.

21: Cleveland Browns DB Erich Barnes (played hoops briefly for Purdue as sophomore in 1955-56) had an interception in a 31-20 playoff win against the Dallas Cowboys in 1968. . . . Chicago Bears QB Young Bussey (LSU hoops letterman in late 1930s) completed his lone pass in the 1941 NFL championship game for eight yards in a 37-9 win against the New York Giants. George Halas (starting guard for Illinois' Big Ten Conference titlist in 1916-17) coached the Bears. TB Tuffy Leemans (three-year hoops letterman for George Washington in mid-1930s) passed for 73 yards and chipped in with a Giants-high 52 rushing yards. Bears B Ray Nolting (Cincinnati hoops letterman in 1936) rushed for 13 yards on four carries. Bears E Dick Plasman (Vanderbilt two-year starting center named to 1936 All-SEC Tournament second five) had a game-high 48 receiving yards on two catches. . . . Los Angeles Rams rookie E Bob Carey (forward-center averaged 8.8 ppg in three-year Michigan State career in early 1950s) had three pass receptions for 30 yards in 31-21 setback against the Detroit Lions in 1952 playoff game. Rams S Norb Hecker (four-sport letterman including hoops with Baldwin-Wallace OH) returned an interception 20 yards. Lions HB Doak Walker (SMU hoops letterman as freshman in 1945-46) threw a 24-yard touchdown pass and had two receptions for 75 yards. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers TB Johnny Clement (SMU hoops letterman in 1940) had a team-high 59 rushing yards in a 21-0 playoff setback against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1947. Steelers E Elbie Nickel (Cincinnati's second-leading scorer in 1942 also earned hoop letter in 1947) had team-high 32 receiving yards. . . . San Diego Chargers TE Antonio Gates (second-team All-MAC selection in 2002 when Kent State finished runner-up in South Regional) caught two touchdown passes from Philip Rivers in a 41-24 win against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2008. . . . Chicago Bears rookie TE Greg Latta (two-year Morgan State letterman averaged 9.3 ppg and 5.4 rpg in 15 games in 1970-71) caught three touchdown passes in a 42-17 win against the New Orleans Saints in 1975. . . . Philadelphia Eagles DB Joe Lavender (averaged 13.4 ppg and 6.6 rpg for San Diego State in 1969-70 and 1970-71) returned an interception 36 yards for a touchdown in a 26-3 win against the Washington Redskins in 1975. Five years later as a member of the Redskins, Lavender had two interceptions in a 31-7 win against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1980. . . . Houston Oilers CB Zeke Moore (Lincoln MO hoops letterman in mid-1960s) had an interception in 56-7 playoff setback against the Oakland Raiders in 1969. . . . Minnesota Vikings rookie TE Joe Senser (two-time NCAA Division I leader in FG% averaged 11.4 ppg and 7.4 rpg while shooting 66.2% from floor in four-year career for West Chester State PA) caught two first-half touchdown passes from Tommy Kramer in a 20-16 setback against the Houston Oilers in 1980 season finale. . . . Denver Broncos WR Rod Smith (swingman was Missouri Southern State hoops letterman as sophomore in 1990-91) caught two second-quarter touchdown passes from John Elway in a 38-3 win against the San Diego Chargers in 1997. . . . Miami Dolphins DE Jason Taylor (averaged 8 ppg and 5.4 rpg for Akron in 1994-95) had three sacks in a 20-3 win against the Buffalo Bills in 2003. . . . Miami Dolphins WR Lamar Thomas (collected 16 points and 4 rebounds in four games for Miami FL in 1990-91) had six pass receptions for 136 yards - including three touchdowns from Dan Marino - in a 31-21 win against the Denver Broncos in 1998. Thomas had multiple catches in all but one of 15 regular-season games. . . . TE Bob Windsor (played two games for Kentucky in 1965-66 under coach Adolph Rupp) caught 22-yard touchdown pass from John Brodie in the fourth quarter to power the San Francisco 49ers to a 14-13 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1969.

22: Kansas City Chiefs QB Len Dawson (Purdue hooper in 1956-57) threw four touchdown passes -including 82-yarder to Frank Jackson - in a 48-0 win against the New York Jets in 1963. . . . Carolina Panthers DE Greg Hardy (Ole Miss backup forward as freshman in 2006-07) had three sacks in a 17-13 victory against the New Orleans Saints in 2013. . . . Minnesota Vikings QB Joe Kapp (backup forward averaged 1.8 ppg and 1.2 rpg for California's PCC champions in 1957 and 1958) threw two fourth-quarter touchdown passes in a 24-14 playoff setback against the Baltimore Colts in 1968. Vikings DT Gary Larsen (ex-Marine played multiple hoops seasons for Concordia MN in early 1960s) had a sack. Colts TE John Mackey (Syracuse hooper in 1960-61) caught three passes for 92 yards - including a 49-yard TD from Earl Morrall. . . . Pittsburgh Steelers E Cy McClairen (two-time all-league selection scored 36 points for Bethune-Cookman in 1953 SIAC Tournament championship game) opened the game's scoring with a 48-yard touchdown pass reception from Morrall in 27-2 win against the Chicago Cardinals in 1957. . . . San Francisco 49ers rookie E R.C. Owens (led small colleges with 27.1 rpg in 1953-54 while also averaging 23.5 ppg for College of Idaho) opened a playoff game's scoring by catching a 34-yard touchdown pass from Y.A. Tittle in a 31-27 setback against the Detroit Lions in 1957. 49ers E Billy Wilson (averaged 3.3 ppg as senior letterman for San Jose State in 1950-51) caught a 12-yard TD pass from Tittle. . . . New York Yankees TB Ace Parker (Duke hoops letterman in 1936) completed 8-of-18 passes in 14-9 setback against the Cleveland Browns in 1946 NFL championship game. . . . Oakland Raiders WR Art Powell (averaged 10.5 ppg and 8.2 rpg for San Jose State in 1956-57) caught 10 passes for 247 yards - including four touchdowns from Tom Flores - in a 52-49 win against the Houston Oilers in 1963. . . . Kansas City Chiefs FL Otis Taylor (backup small forward for Prairie View A&M) had four pass receptions for 117 yards in a 41-6 setback against the Oakland Raiders in 1968 AFL playoffs.

23: Neill Armstrong (played one game under legendary Oklahoma A&M coach Hank Iba in 1944) coached the Chicago Bears to a 27-17 wild-card game setback against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1979. Eagles WR Harold Carmichael (starter two seasons for Southern LA averaged 9.8 ppg and 10.6 rpg in 1969-70) caught two touchdown passes. . . . Oakland Raiders WR Ronald Curry (averaged 4.2 ppg, 2.5 rpg and 3 apg for North Carolina in 1998-99 and 2000-01) caught 11 passes in a 20-9 setback against the Kansas City Chiefs in 2006. It was Curry's third consecutive contest with at least eight receptions. . . . Washington Redskins LB London Fletcher (started two games for St. Francis PA as freshman in 1993-94 before transferring to John Carroll OH) had an interception for the third consecutive contest and chipped in with 10 tackles in a 27-20 win against the Philadelphia Eagles in 2012. . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught 10 passes for 137 yards in a 25-20 setback against the Detroit Lions in 2007. . . . Miami Dolphins QB Bob Griese (sophomore guard for Purdue in 1964-65) threw two touchdown passes in a 34-16 playoff win against the Cincinnati Bengals in 1973. . . . Los Angeles Rams rookie Norb Hecker (four-sport letterman including hoops with Baldwin-Wallace OH) had a game-saving tackle in a 24-17 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1951 NFL championship contest. Rams E Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch (starting center for Michigan hoops in 1944) caught four passes for 66 yards. . . . Dallas Cowboys DB Manny Hendrix (All-WAC second-team selection for Utah as senior in 1985-86 averaged 12.1 ppg and team-high 5.1 apg as sophomore) had an interception in a 17-3 setback against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1990. . . . Dallas Texans rookie DE Bill Hull (forward for Wake Forest squad finishing third in 1962 NCAA Tournament averaged 6.5 ppg and 7.3 rpg in two varsity seasons) returned an interception 23 yards to help set up the game-winning field goal in overtime in 20-17 win against the Houston Oilers in 1962 AFL championship game. . . . Tampa Bay Buccaneers QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) threw three touchdown passes in a 48-21 win against the New Orleans Saints in 2001. . . . Los Angeles Rams TE James McDonald (four-year Southern California letterman in early 1980s averaged 8.2 ppg and 4.8 rpg as senior forward) caught two passes for 18 yards in a 16-13 playoff setback against the New York Giants in 1984. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw three touchdown passes in a 38-23 win against the New Orleans Saints in 2007. . . . Chicago Bears DE Julius Peppers (averaged 5.7 ppg and 3.7 rpg while shooting 60.7% from floor for North Carolina in 1999-00 and 2000-01) had three sacks in a 28-13 win against the Arizona Cardinals in 2012. . . . Dallas Cowboys QB Roger Staubach (Navy varsity hooper in 1962-63) threw two fourth-quarter touchdown passes in a 30-28 playoff win against the San Francisco 49ers in 1972. The next year, Staubach threw two TD passes - including an 83-yarder to Drew Pearson - in a 27-16 playoff win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1973. . . . San Diego Chargers WR Kitrick Taylor (Washington State hooper in 1984-85 and 1986-87) returned a punt 55 yards for touchdown in 24-21 setback against the Kansas City Chiefs in 1990.

24: Miami Dolphins WR Chris Chambers (played briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) caught two second-quarter touchdown passes in a 24-10 win against the Tennessee Titans in 2005. . . . Los Angeles Rams rookie RB Glenn Davis (Army hooper in 1944-45 and 1945-46) opened the 1950 NFL championship game's scoring with an 82-yard touchdown pass from Bob Waterfield in 30-28 setback against the Cleveland Browns. Browns QB Otto Graham (Big Ten Conference runner-up in scoring as Northwestern sophomore in 1941-42 and junior in 1942-43) completed 22-of-33 passes for 298 yards and four TDs while chipping with 99 rushing yards. . . . Oakland Raiders TE Rickey Dudley (averaged 13.3 ppg and 7.5 rpg as senior in 1994-95 when leading Ohio State in rebounding and finishing third in scoring) caught two touchdown passes from Rich Gannon in a 52-9 win against the Carolina Panthers in 2000. . . . Dallas Cowboys CB Cornell Green (Utah State's all-time leading scorer and rebounder when career ended in 1961-62) returned an interception 60 yards for a touchdown in a 50-14 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1967 playoff game. . . . San Diego Chargers rookie WR Vincent Jackson (Northern Colorado's scoring leader with 13.6 ppg in 2003-04 while also contributing 5.6 rpg and 3.1 apg) caught two touchdown passes from Philip Rivers in a 20-7 win against the Seattle Seahawks in 2006. . . . Chicago Bears DB R.W. McQuarters (Oklahoma State hooper in 1995-96 and 1996-97 started two games) returned an interception 61 yards for a touchdown in 23-20 win against the Detroit Lions in 2000. . . . Seattle Seahawks TE Pete Metzelaars (averaged 19.2 ppg and 11.4 rpg for Wabash IN while setting NCAA Division III field-goal shooting records for single season as senior in 1981-82 and career) had a five-yard touchdown reception in a 31-7 playoff win against the Denver Broncos in 1983. . . . Carolina Panthers DE Julius Peppers (averaged 5.7 ppg and 3.7 rpg while shooting 60.7% from floor for North Carolina in 1999-00 and 2000-01) had three sacks in a 24-20 setback against the Dallas Cowboys in 2005. . . . Baltimore Colts WR Freddie Scott (averaged 5.3 ppg as sophomore forward for Amherst MA in 1971-72) had two pass receptions for 45 yards in a 37-31 setback against the Oakland Raiders in 1977 playoff game. . . . San Diego Chargers rookie DB Bud Whitehead (averaged 2.8 ppg and 2.5 rpg in 15 games for Florida State in 1959-60) had two interceptions in a 10-3 playoff setback against the Houston Oilers in 1961.

25: Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught 11 of his league-high 102 passes - including two second-quarter touchdowns - in a 31-30 win against the Oakland Raiders in 2004. . . . Minnesota Vikings QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) threw two first-half touchdown passes in a 30-23 setback against the Baltimore Colts in 2005.

26: Washington Redskins QB Sammy Baugh (TCU three-year hoops letterman was All-SWC honorable mention selection as senior in 1936-37) threw two second-half touchdown passes in a 41-21 playoff setback against the Chicago Bears in 1943. Bears E Jim Benton (forward was Arkansas' third-leading scorer in SWC play as senior in 1937-38) caught a 26-yard touchdown pass from Sid Luckman. Luke Johnsos (Northwestern hoops letterman in 1927 and 1928) co-coached the Bears. Bears B Ray Nolting (Cincinnati hoops letterman in 1936) rushed for 30 yards on seven carries and returned two punts for 17 yards. . . . Rookie FB Bill Bowman (fouled out with four points in only basketball game with William & Mary in 1953-54) scored the Detroit Lions' only touchdown (five-yard rush) in a 56-10 setback against the Cleveland Browns in 1954 NFL championship game. Bowman also had a 50-yard run from scrimmage in the contest. Browns DE Len Ford (center for Morgan State's CIAA hoops titlist in 1944) returned two interceptions a total of 45 yards. Browns E Pete Brewster (forward-center was Purdue's fourth-leading scorer as junior and senior) caught an eight-yard TD pass and 45-yard reception from Otto Graham (Big Ten Conference runner-up in scoring as Northwestern sophomore in 1941-42 and junior in 1942-43). Graham threw three first-half TD passes and rushed for three TDs. The next year, Graham threw two TD passes (50 and 35 yards) and rushed for two TDs while Ford had another INT in a 38-14 win against the Los Angeles Rams in 1955 NFL title tilt. . . . A fourth-quarter touchdown reception by TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) carried the Kansas City Chiefs to a 31-24 win against the Oakland Raiders in 1998. . . . RB Paul Hornung (averaged 6.1 ppg in 10 contests for Notre Dame in 1954-55) opened the Green Bay Packers' scoring with a rushing touchdown in a 13-10 playoff win against the Baltimore Colts in 1965. . . . QB Brad Johnson (part-time starting forward for Florida State as freshman in 1987-88 when averaging 5.9 ppg and shooting 89.1% from free-throw line) passed for 471 yards - including 33-yarder for touchdown in overtime - to give the Washington Redskins a 26-20 win against the San Francisco 49ers in 1999. . . . New York Jets RB Johnny Johnson (averaged 11.2 ppg, 6.5 rpg and 3.2 apg in 1988-89 after majority of hoop team members walked off San Jose State squad) totaled 175 yards in rushing (94 on 16 carries) and pass receiving (81 on eight catches) in a 16-14 setback against the Buffalo Bills in 1993. . . . Houston Texans WR Jacoby Jones (part-time starter averaged 3.4 ppg and 3.7 rpg for Lane TN in 2004-05 and 2005-06) had five pass receptions for 115 yards in a 24-23 setback against the Denver Broncos in 2010. . . . Washington Redskins QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) threw two touchdown passes in a 24-20 playoff setback against the San Francisco 49ers in 1971. . . . Cleveland Browns RB Terry Kirby (averaged 3.4 ppg as Virginia freshman in 1989-90 and 2.1 as sophomore in 1990-91) rushed for two touchdowns in a 29-28 setback against the Indianapolis Colts in 1999. . . . Chicago Bears TE Greg Latta (two-year Morgan State letterman averaged 9.3 ppg and 5.4 rpg in 15 games in 1970-71) had two pass receptions for 25 yards in a 37-7 playoff setback against the Dallas Cowboys in 1977. . . . San Francisco 49ers DB Ronnie Lott (USC hooper as junior in 1979-80) returned an interception 83 yards for fourth-quarter touchdown in 26-13 win against the Kansas City Chiefs in 1982. . . . Minnesota Vikings TE Joe Senser (two-time NCAA Division I leader in FG% averaged 11.4 ppg and 7.4 rpg while shooting 66.2% from floor in four-year career for West Chester State PA) caught 10 passes in a 42-14 setback against the New York Jets in 1982. . . . San Francisco 49ers TE Bob Windsor (played two games for Kentucky in 1965-66 under coach Adolph Rupp) caught a touchdown pass from John Brodie in 24-20 playoff win against the Washington Redskins in 1971.

27: Detroit Lions E Cloyce Box (combined with twin brother Boyce to help West Texas win Border Conference hoop championship in 1943) caught four passes for 54 yards in a 17-16 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1953 NFL championship contest. Lions QB Bobby Layne (Texas hooper in 1944-45) threw a 33-yard touchdown pass in the fourth quarter. Lions HB Doak Walker (SMU hoops letterman as freshman in 1945-46) opened the game's scoring with a rushing TD. . . . Cleveland Browns FB Jim Brown (#2-scorer with 14 ppg for Syracuse as sophomore in 1954-55 before averaging 11.3 as junior) rushed for 114 yards on 27 carries in 1964 NFL championship game (27-0 against Baltimore Colts). It was Brown's lone playoff win. . . . Weeb Ewbank (hoops letterman for Miami OH in 1926-27 and 1927-28) coached the Baltimore Colts to a 31-16 victory against the New York Giants in 1959 NFL championship game. Colts DB Johnny Sample (freshman hooper for UMES) had two interceptions - returning one 42 yards for a touchdown. . . . Miami Dolphins QB Bob Griese (sophomore guard for Purdue in 1964-65) threw two touchdown passes in a 21-14 playoff setback against the Oakland Raiders in 1970. . . . Baltimore Ravens TE Todd Heap (grabbed 14 rebounds in 11 games for Arizona State in 1999-00) caught two touchdown passes from Joe Flacco for the second straight week in 2009. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw three touchdown passes in a 31-7 win against the Washington Redskins in 2003. Six years later, McNabb passed for 322 yards and three TDs in a 30-27 win against the Denver Broncos in 2009. . . . San Francisco 49ers DB R.W. McQuarters (Oklahoma State hooper in 1995-96 and 1996-97 started two games) returned a punt 72 yards for touchdown in 38-19 win against the St. Louis Rams in 1998. . . . Denver Broncos WR Rod Smith (swingman was Missouri Southern State hoops letterman as sophomore in 1990-91) caught a 43-yard touchdown pass from John Elway in a 42-17 playoff win against the Jacksonville Jaguars in 1997. The next year, Smith had nine pass receptions for 158 yards in a 28-21 win against the Seattle Seahawks in 1998.

28: Cincinnati Bengals QB Ken Anderson (swingman finished Augustana IL career in early 1970s as fifth-leading scorer in school history with 1,044 points) threw two fourth-quarter touchdown passes in a 31-28 playoff setback against the Oakland Raiders in 1975. . . . Philadelphia Eagles E Neill Armstrong (played one game under legendary Oklahoma A&M coach Hank Iba in 1944) caught two passes for 16 yards in a 28-21 setback against the Chicago Cardinals in 1947 NFL championship game. Cardinals E Billy Dewell (three-time All-SWC first-team pick for SMU in late 1930s) caught a team-long 38-yard pass from Paul Christman. Eagles E Dick Humbert (three-year starter captained Richmond as senior in 1940-41 when averaging 7.4 ppg) caught two passes for 30 yards. . . . Cleveland Browns rookie E Pete Brewster (forward-center was Purdue's fourth-leading scorer as junior and senior) had a game-high 53 receiving yards in 17-7 setback against the Detroit Lions in 1952 NFL championship contest. Lions QB Bobby Layne (Texas hooper in 1944-45) opened the game's scoring with a two-yard rushing touchdown. Lions HB Doak Walker (SMU hoops letterman as freshman in 1945-46) had a team-high 97 rushing yards featuring 67-yard TD. . . . Miami Dolphins WR Chris Chambers (played briefly for Wisconsin under coach Dick Bennett in 1997-98) caught nine passes for 153 yards in a 23-21 win against the New York Jets in 2003. . . . Buffalo Bills FL Elbert Dubenion (solid rebounder and defensive player for Bluffton OH in late 1950s) caught a 93-yard touchdown pass from Daryle Lamonica in a 26-8 setback against the Boston Patriots in 1963 AFL playoff contest. . . . Weeb Ewbank (hoops letterman for Miami OH in 1926-27 and 1927-28) coached the Baltimore Colts to a 23-17 overtime victory against the New York Giants in 1958 NFL championship game. . . . Oakland Raiders DB Ronnie Lott (USC hooper as junior in 1979-80) returned an interception 35 yards in 10-6 playoff setback against the Kansas City Chiefs following 1991 season. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw two second-quarter touchdown passes in a 44-6 win against the Dallas Cowboys in 2008. . . . Miami Dolphins RB Jerris McPhail (starting point guard for Mount Olive NC with 11 ppg in early 1990s) had five pass receptions in a 17-3 setback against the New England Patriots in 1997 playoff game. . . . WR Andre Rison (backup hoops guard for Michigan State in 1987-88) got the Atlanta Falcons on the scoreboard with a 24-yard touchdown reception in 27-20 playoff win against the New Orleans Saints in 1991.

29: Baltimore Colts DE Ordell Braase (first-team All-NCC pick for South Dakota in 1952-53 and 1953-54) had three sacks in a 34-0 playoff win against the Cleveland Browns in 1968. . . . George Halas (starting guard for Illinois' Big Ten Conference hoops titlist in 1916-17) coached the Chicago Bears to a 14-10 win against the New York Giants in 1963 NFL championship contest. Giants starting SS Dick Pesonen (two-year Minnesota-Duluth hoops letterman was starting guard in 1959-60) recovered a fumble. . . . Carolina Panthers DE Greg Hardy (Ole Miss backup forward as freshman in 2006-07) had four sacks and five tackles in a 21-20 victory against the Atlanta Falcons in 2013. . . . Baltimore Ravens TE Todd Heap (grabbed 14 rebounds in 11 games for Arizona State in 1999-00) caught seven passes for 146 yards in a 34-31 setback against the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2002. . . . Detroit Lions RB John Henry Johnson (made 5-of-8 FGAs in five games for Saint Mary's in 1950-51) rushed for 34 yards on seven carries and caught one pass for 16 yards in a 59-14 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1957 NFL championship game. Lions QB Jerry Reichow (Iowa hooper in 1954-55) threw a 16-yard touchdown pass. . . . San Francisco 49ers DB Ronnie Lott (USC hooper as junior in 1979-80) returned an interception 38 yards in 21-10 playoff win against the New York Giants in 1984. . . . Houston Oilers QB Gifford Nielsen (BYU swingman averaged 6.5 ppg and 2.7 rpg in 1973-74 and 1974-75) threw a go-ahead 47-yard touchdown pass to Mike Renfro in 17-14 playoff win against the San Diego Chargers in 1979. . . . TE Marcus Pollard (JC transfer averaged 7.3 ppg and 5 rpg for Bradley in 1992-93 and 1993-94) caught an 11-yard touchdown pass from Peyton Manning with 2:26 remaining in the fourth quarter to give the Indianapolis Colts a 20-13 win against Jacksonville Jaguars in 2002.

30: FB Rick Casares (Florida's scoring and rebounding leader both seasons as All-SEC second-team selection in 1951-52 and 1952-53) contributed the Chicago Bears' lone touchdown with a nine-yard rush in a 47-7 setback against the New York Giants in 1956 NFL championship game. Bears E Harlon Hill (Florence State AL hoops letterman in 1951) had six catches for team-high 87 receiving yards. . . . Cincinnati Bengals LB James Francis (averaged 3 ppg and 3.6 rpg for Baylor in 1986-87 and 1987-88) returned an interception 17 yards for a touchdown in 21-14 win against the Cleveland Browns in 1990. . . . Kansas City Chiefs TE Tony Gonzalez (averaged 6.4 ppg and 4.3 rpg for California from 1994-95 through 1996-97) caught two touchdown passes in a 30-26 win against the Jacksonville Jaguars in 2001. . . . New Orleans Saints TE Jimmy Graham (part-time starter for Miami FL averaged 4.2 ppg and 4.2 rpg from 2005-06 through 2008-09) caught nine passes for 115 yards in a 44-38 setback against the Carolina Panthers in 2012. . . . New Orleans Saints WR Willie Jackson (started five hoops games for Florida in 1989-90) caught three second-half touchdown passes in a 31-28 playoff win against the St. Louis Rams in 2000. . . . Dallas Cowboys DE Too Tall Jones (backup center averaged 1.7 ppg and 2.6 rpg for Tennessee State in 1969-70 and 1970-71) had two sacks in a 27-20 win against the Atlanta Falcons in 1978 NFC divisional playoffs. Falcons CB Rolland Lawrence (captain of Tabor KS hoops squad as senior in 1972-73) had an interception. . . . Jacksonville Jaguars WR Matt Jones (started two of his 11 Arkansas games in 2001-02 when averaging 4.2 ppg and 2.3 rpg and 10 of 17 in 2003-04 when averaging 5 ppg and 4.5 rpg) caught eight passes for 138 yards in a 42-28 setback against the Houston Texans in 2007. . . . Minnesota Vikings DT Gary Larsen (ex-Marine played multiple hoops seasons for Concordia MN in early 1960s) had a sack in 27-10 win against the Dallas Cowboys in 1973 playoff contest. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw three touchdown passes in a 24-21 win against the New York Giants in 2001. Six years later, McNabb passed for 345 yards in a 17-9 win against the Buffalo Bills in 2007. . . . Jacksonville Jaguars WR Micah Ross (Jacksonville's leading scorer, rebounder and FG% shooter as senior in 1997-98) returned four kickoffs in a 30-26 setback against the Kansas City Chiefs in 2001. . . . New York Giants WR Del Shofner (Baylor hoops letterman in 1956) caught five passes for 69 yards in a 16-7 playoff setback against the Green Bay Packers in 1962.

31: Green Bay Packers RB Paul Hornung (averaged 6.1 ppg in 10 contests for Notre Dame in 1954-55) opened the game's scoring with a six-yard rushing touchdown in 37-0 playoff win against the New York Giants in 1961 NFL championship contest. Packers E Ron Kramer (three-time All-Big Ten Conference selection was Michigan's MVP each season and All-American as senior in 1956-57) had game highs of four pass receptions and 80 receiving yards - including two touchdowns from Bart Starr. Giants WR Del Shofner (Baylor hoops letterman in 1956) caught three passes for 41 yards. . . . Washington Redskins QB Billy Kilmer (UCLA hooper under legendary coach John Wooden in 1959-60) threw two touchdown passes in a 26-3 playoff win against the Dallas Cowboys in 1972. . . . Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb (averaged 2.3 points in 18 games for Syracuse in 1995-96 and 1996-97) threw two touchdown passes in a 21-3 playoff win against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2000.

Impact of former college hoopers on professional football in November
Impact of former college hoopers on professional football in October
Impact of former college hoopers on professional football in September

Science Fiction "V": What Should "V" Designate Amid ESPN's Annual Rerun?

Weekly, we get a weak effort from #MessMedia hacks telling the entire story as public respect for their vocation goes down quicker than NFL ratings running in parallel with National Anthem-loving GQ poster boy #ColonKrapernick taking a knee. During last year's messy presidential campaign, Wikileaks hacking confirmed what many believed about collusion between left-leaning politicians and a predictably pathetic press. If the lame-stream media did its job, there wouldn't be any need for paying attention to undisputed facts distributed by Wikileaks. At any rate, the best pre-Christmas present in decades for conservatives has been watching unhinged leftists whine and vomit in fetal position after biased bozos were Trumped. Seems as if majority of press puke are in the woods tracking down loser to console her and take a Shrillary selfie with flipping electors. Regrettably, the progressive mindset depicted by inauguration-nauseated Rockette(s), White House Christmas-party boycotting #CNNSucks and in lopsided editorial endorsements for POTUS also infects the toy department (sports).

According to Wikipedia, V was an American science fiction TV series running two seasons on ABC, chronicling the arrival on Earth of a technologically advanced alien species ostensibly coming in peace, but actually boasting sinister motives. This could be Webster's definition of the lame-stream media seeking therapy for post-election anxiety. But according to CollegeHoopedia.com, ABC also has an annual V rerun on vaunted ESPN while losing in excess of 10 million subscribers over four years. The intent isn't vile but, if an observer values the whole truth, there is vast soap-boxing fiction involved amid the "V" all day every day as the vindicated big man on ESPN's Jesus-free campus.

Veering off-course with velocity promoting gabby "V" - not baby "J" - as the reason for the season, the Nationwide Leader's culture violates the time-honored vow of telling the entire story in a veracious way. It's vexing as ESPN's parade of glorification pitchmen, including staffers and it-takes-a-village coaches, incessantly laud former commentator Jim Valvano by chapter and verse. If "V" sycophants could fly, the mess media highlighted by ESPN and most of the coaching community would be jets. A "Jimmy V Week" culminates with an early-season classic to enhance cancer research fundraising for a foundation named after an individual who joins John Calipari (UMass/Memphis) and Jerry Tarkanian (Long Beach State/UNLV) as the only repeat-offender coaches shackled with having multiple schools under their watch forced to vacate NCAA playoff participation. Too bad 100% of the donated plaudits don't go straight through a truth detector such as the "biased" New York Times, which detailed how ESPN received more than $250 million in state tax breaks and credits thus far this century.

Anyone with a visible pulse supports the vision of finding a cure for the vulnerable afflicted by cancer, but a classic lack-of-proper-perspective stemming from the cult-of-personality dynamic is ESPN's vivid hero worship of the vibrant Valvano. He wasn't a bloodthirsty vampire villain but there are a variety of vigorous reasons for not carrying ESPN's water supporting his canonization in the wake of vanquishing Houston to vault to the 1983 NCAA playoff title. How was his deceit that much different from another cancer celebrity such as Lance Armstrong? After Valvano ran afoul of NCAA investigators at Iona, a private attorney retained by North Carolina State volunteered he was convinced that the institution could successfully sue him for failing to ensure the academic progress of his NCSU players. While Duke overdoses on recruiting one-and-done exemptions with board scores nowhere close to average Cameron Crazy student, the biggest scholastic question in the ACC is which school - NCSU vs. UNC - wins the battle for most egregious academic scandal over the last three decades.

At the very least, virile Valvano should have verified that standout guard Sidney Lowe took a remedial tax preparation course to help him steer clear of vice squad by vandalizing the state or Child Rearing 101; especially if Lowe, twice voted All-ACC and a first-teamer with teammate Thurl Bailey in 1983, was going to become one of his head coaching successors with the Wolfpack. Additional suspect characters aligning with Valvano at NCSU included Kenny Drummond, Russell Pierre, Dinky Proctor, Charles Shackleford, Craig Tyson and Chris Washburn (of 470 SAT fame in a league where athletes previously had to reach 800 to be eligible). Did Jimmy V brag that stereo-stealer Washburn was going to "make our program"? Did V mean break rather than make? Awash in intellect, Shackleford, who admitted accepting $65,000 cash from outside influences during his final two years enrolled in college, is perhaps best known for the following quote: "Left hand, right hand, it doesn't matter. I'm amphibious." After a series of drug-related incidents, he was found dead in his apartment at the age of 50.

At the same time of holiday season King Herod-like ESPN vetoed a "venal" hospital ad a couple of years ago celebrating Jesus before relenting, it seemingly will "never give up" a vintage and valiant voyage portraying V as the most virtuous coach in history. The sanitized version is in the network's veins akin to trying to duplicate anchorman Ron Burgundy's humor in promotional ads. Voicing opposition to this mythical narrative leaves a cynic open to vilification as being venomous. Still, the network's doctored depiction of V is as honest as POTUS and his vultures telling citizens with a "period" about retaining their current physician (ESPN previously aired ObamaCare ad passing its rigid standards); authentic as the sign language interpreter at a Nelson Mandela memorial; genuinely patriotic as lip-syncing Beyonce; real as Ray "Dancin' On Their Graves" Lewis lecturing us about NFL violence and ball-deflation ethics; genuine as claiming no behind-the-scenes negotiations occurred naming Bruce Jenner's inner woman courageous nearly 40 years after he was a gold-medal winning Olympian, or as valid as fake girlfriend of former Notre Dame All-American linebacker Manti Te'o.

Irish idealist Dick Vitale spearheads promoting the V Foundation, impressively raising in the neighborhood of $200 million. Understandably, his visceral reaction probably is that any dissent makes Valvano the victim of a vicious vendetta. Anything but vapid, there is no doubt vivacious Vitale means well and has his heart in the proper place serving as Valvano's valet. But as verbose Vitale is wont to do, he is vulnerable to vehemently going overboard with his voluminous embellishment. Preying on emotions, a majority of vacuous media smugly fall in line seemingly signing off on one of those old phantom NCSU readmission agreements after flunking out where they made a commitment "pledging to work hard (at maintaining image) and keep a positive mental attitude." Does press know if Washburn signed worthless piece of paper in new vroom Datsun before vagabond ventured out to find victim's stereo while needing help from staff finding various classrooms?

In an affront to valuable numbers that never lie, there are fake-news times when ESPN sycophants operate in a vacuum shamelessly enhancing Valvano's credentials as a "survive-and-advance" tactician, perpetuating a falsehood he was a late-game strategical genius. You can't take a vacation from the veracity of cold hard facts having Valvano rank in the lower third of DI coaches among those with at least 150 close contests (decided by fewer than six points). Capitalizing on six opponents combining to shoot an anemic 56.8% from the free-throw line, the law of averages was with NCSU in 1983 when it became the only school to have as many as four NCAA playoff games decided by one or two points en route to a title. The Wolfpack trailed in the final minute of seven of its last nine triumphs.

People in power need to be held accountable even if a coach such as Duke's Mike Krzyzewski claims many of the "allegations were fabrications" against his ACC counterpart who entered the league together in 1980-81. "I can't breathe" holding opinion unless Coach K moonlighted as an investigator because there is no reason to be vague and treat big boys with velvet gloves. ESPN could virtually avoid any vanishing credibility in this instance by incorporating deceased Rick Majerus in the foundation equation. After all, the 24-year veteran college head coach was also a vocal ESPN analyst. Unless it detracts from the storyline, call it the V & M Foundation and add heart disease to the venture's research grants. Didn't Majerus exhibit as much, if not more, valor? Perhaps trend-setting broadcaster Stuart Scott and his battle with cancer should be included as a focal point.

A tearjerker ESPY speech notwithstanding, it's a cancer of priorities and ESPN simply sullies its reputation with insufferable verbal voodoo vouching Valvano was something he wasn't beyond a good coach who never had a season with fewer than four defeats in conference competition. Amid narcissism and extensive self-promotion, an "inspirational" story reeks of overkill because vermin among a complicit sports media are predictably unprincipled and offer the maximum tear-inducement reminiscent of a fairytale sans conveying the entire picture. Forget the vulgar academic progress of Valvano's players at N.C. State (735 average SAT score and excessive number of positive drug tests during the 1980s). No Extra Sensitive Pious Network should be an outside-the-lines enabler seemingly unaccountable while selling only a partial story. They have an obligation to visit the whole story; not vacillate and be on verge of failing their constituency in regard to vainly providing a viable role model.

As for venerable Majerus, there won't be a vicarious movie or "30 for 30" special made about his self-effacing humor, eating habits and fact none of his NCAA playoff teams with three different schools ever had to vacate NCAA play. In a stark scholastic contrast, his 1998 Utah squad provided the vanguard of Final Four achievements - only team ever to feature three Academic All-Americans among its versatile regulars. For the record, Majerus ranked among the top third of coaches in games decided by fewer than six points. But he simply doesn't fit into a contrived storyline. It would be a surprise if Utah players under Majerus took an "Understanding Music" class during Christmas vacation to help stay eligible like NCSU scholars did under Valvano.

Just keep everything in perspective. Alluding to allegations about a professor altering grades of Wolfpack players, the faculty senate chairman at the time asked SI: "If we're supposedly changing grades, how come we have so many people in academic difficulty?" Pulitzer Prize winner Claude Sitton, a doughty local editor/columnist for the Raleigh News & Observer during Valvano's tenure, was unapologetic about the paper's contemporaneous coverage of the NCSU scandal. "Looking back on it, Valvano just initiated academic rape as far as basketball players were concerned," Sitton said. "But Valvano only did what (Chancellor Bruce) Poulton wanted him to do, and that was win ball games no matter how."

In a scornful column, Sitton wrote: "College sports, in short, are corrupt. The rot reaches far beyond the campus - to the kid on the corner who thinks sports opens the glory road, the high school teacher who gives a player a free pass, the TV executive who manipulates universities for profit, sportswriters who see, hear and speak no evil, and all who know that higher education has been turned into a sideshow by the commercial sports conglomerate and do nothing to end it." Sitton's summary continued to ring true as the ACC summoned Louisville and Syracuse to its ranks in recent years as they each soon went on probationary status with their Hall of Shame coaches.

ESPN's abundant coverage seemed to revel in cancer frontman Lance Armstrong's arrogant stumblin' and bumblin' "one big lie" rather than taking his bike-ride fall in a valley as time for self-reflection. The view from this vantage point is that defend-the-brand revisionist history is a misguided echo chamber. Amid the distortion, a final verdict persists about a greater-good higher calling. As many folks as possible should make a vintage donation to the V Foundation. Just envision V as Victory (over cancer) or as Vitale (for his long-term heavy lifting in the project).

It wasn't long before name-dropping ESPN, via former Out House correspondent Andy Katz apparently getting as much beer-summit face time with trustworthy ex-POTUS as ex-HHS Secretary Kathleen "Get-In-Line" Sebelius, went viral giving a prominent "Audacity-of-Hype" venue for Oval Office NCAA bracket selections. But the West Wing(ing) verve must absorb so much dignified time for the selfie-taking hoopster-in-chief that a Sgt. Schultz "I-know-nothing" routine emerges while chronically pleading ignorance about various less vital matters such as the Benghazi terrorist attack, ShrillaryRotten's multiple email address changes as Secretary of Yoga, IRS targeting of conservatives, Fast and Furious gun-running, healthcare exchange ineptitude, NSA spying on allies, North Korea's cyber "vandalism," Justice Department snooping on national media, etc., and then failing to attend a church service at Christmas. Meanwhile, a void in thought-police treatment made more faith-influenced individuals nearly vomit when the network's "inn" didn't have room for the authentic Messiah's message vying for a little air time more important to many Americans than giving free political points.

As the #AudacityofHype, our departed fearless leader, might proclaim: "Cut it out!" Thus, it was no surprise sister network A&E emerged equally intolerant of deeply-held religious beliefs when "be(ing) original" by suspending/marginalizing the brassy "Duck Dynasty" patriarch for his version of "Vagina Monologues." Are you buyin' what ESPN's flock of quacks are sellin' verbatim - accepting the laughing/thinking/crying hook, line and sinker? Very odd this vociferous emphasis on V. Upon "ducking" and turning the other cheek again, it's time to say an old-fashioned: "Merry CHRISTmas, ESPN!" If this vernacular is objectionable to sensibilities of the politically-correct elite, then avoid a GQ bearded set-up with a patronizing "Happy Holidays!" As recent ESPN personnel layoffs reach into the hundreds again, we'll try for the 100th time to appeal for virtuous network specifically and hoop press generally to lay off attempting portrayal of "V" as someone he wasn't. At least boast the vinegar to go beyond the veneer and never give up attempting to tell the entire tale.

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